Posts Tagged 'Firewall'

October 14, 2013

Product Spotlight: Vyatta Network Gateway Appliance

In the wake of our recent Vyatta network gateway appliance product launch, I thought I'd address some of the most common questions customers have asked me about the new offering. With inquiries spanning the spectrum from broad and general to detailed and specific, I might not be able to cover everything in this blog post, but at the very least, it should give a little more context for our new network gateway offering.

To begin, let's explore the simplest question I've been asked: "What is a network gateway?" A network gateway provides tools to manage traffic into and out of one or more VLANs (Virtual Local Area Networks). The network gateway serves a customer-configurable routing device that sits in front of designated VLANs. The servers in those VLANs route through the network gateway appliance as their first hop instead of Front-end Customer Routers (FCR) or Back-end Customer Routers (BCR). From an infrastructure perspective, SoftLayer's network gateway offering consists of a single server, and in the future, the offering will be expanded to multi-server configurations to support high availability needs and larger clustered configurations.

The general function of a network gateway may seem a little abstract, so let's look at a couple real world use cases to see how you can put that functionality to work in your own cloud environment.

Example 1: Complex Traffic Management
You have a multi-server cloud environment and a complex set of firewall rules that allow certain types of traffic to certain servers from specific addresses. Without a network gateway, you would need to configure multiple hardware and software firewalls throughout your topology and maintain multiple rules sets, but with the network gateway appliance, you streamline your configuration into a single point of control on both the public and private networks.

After you order a gateway appliance in the SoftLayer portal and configure which VLANs route through the appliance, the process of configuring the device is simple: You define your production, development and QA environments with distinct traffic rules, and the network gateway handles the traffic segmentation. If you wanted to create your own VPN to connect your hosted environment to your office or in-house data center, that configuration is quick and easy as well. The high-touch challenge of managing several sets of network rules across multiple devices is simplified and streamlined.

Example 2: Creating a Static NAT
You want to create a static NAT (Network Address Translation) so that you can direct traffic through a public IP address to an internal IP address. With the IPv4 address pool dwindling and new allocations being harder to come by, this configuration is becoming extremely popular to accommodate users who can't yet reach IPv6 addresses. This challenge would normally require a significant level of effort of even the most seasoned systems administrator, but with the gateway appliance, it's a painless process.

In addition to the IPv4 address-saving benefits, your static NAT adds a layer of protection for your internal web servers from the public network, and as we discussed in the first example, your gateway device also serves as a single configuration point for both inbound and outbound firewall rules.

If you have complex network-related needs, and you want granular control of the traffic to and from your servers, a gateway appliance might be the perfect tool for you. You get the control you want and save yourself a significant amount of time and effort configuring and tweaking your environment on-the-fly. You can terminate IPSec VPN tunnels, execute your own network address translation, and run diagnostic commands such as traffic monitoring (tcpdump) on your global environment. And in addition to that, your gateway serves as a single point of contact to configure sophisticated firewall rules!

If you want to learn more about the gateway appliance, check out KnowledgeLayer or contact our friendly sales team directly with your questions: sales@softlayer.com

-Ben

August 14, 2013

Setting Up Your New Server

As a technical support specialist at SoftLayer, I work with new customers regularly, and after fielding a lot of the same kinds of questions about setting up a new server, I thought I'd put together a quick guide that could be a resource for other new customers who are interested in implementing a few best practices when it comes to setting up and securing a new server. This documentation is based on my personal server setup experience and on the experience I've had helping customers with their new servers, so it shouldn't be considered an exhaustive, authoritative guide ... just a helpful and informative one.

Protect Your Data

First and foremost, configure backups for your server. The server is worthless without your data. Data is your business. An old adage says, "It's better to have and not need, than to need and not have." Imagine what would happen to your business if you lost just some of your data. There's no excuse for neglecting backup when configuring your new server. SoftLayer does not backup your server, but SoftLayer offers several options for data protection and backup to fit any of your needs.

Control panels like cPanel and Plesk include backup functionality and can be configured to automatically backup regularly an FTP/NAS account. Configure backups now, before doing anything else. Before migrating or copying your data to the server. This first (nearly empty) backup will be quick. Test the backup by restoring the data. If your server has RAID, it important to remember that RAID is not backup!

For more tips about setting up and checking your backups, check out Risk Management: The Importance of Redundant Backups

Use Strong Passwords

I've seen some very week and vulnerable password on customers' servers. SoftLayer sets a random, complex password on every new server that is provisioned. Don't change it to a weak password using names, birthdays and other trivia that can be found or guessed easily. Remember, a strong password doesn't have to be a complicated one: xkcd: Password Strength

Write down your passwords: "If I write them down and then protect the piece of paper — or whatever it is I wrote them down on — there is nothing wrong with that. That allows us to remember more passwords and better passwords." "We're all good at securing small pieces of paper. I recommend that people write their passwords down on a small piece of paper, and keep it with their other valuable small pieces of paper: in their wallet." Just don't use any of these passwords.
I've gone electronic and use 1Password and discovered just how many passwords I deal with. With such strong, random passwords, you don't have to change your password frequently, but if you have to, you don't have to worry about remembering the new one or updating all of your notes. If passwords are too much of a hassle ...

Or Don't Use Passwords

One of the wonderful things of SSH/SFTP on Linux/FreeBSD is that SSH-keys obviate the problem of passwords. Mac and Linux/FreeBSD have an SSH-client installed by default! There are a lot of great SSH clients available for every medium you'll use to access your server. For Windows, I recommend PuTTY, and for iOS, Panic Prompt.

Firewall

Firewalls block network connections. Configuring a firewall manually can get very complicated, especially when involving protocols like FTP which opens random ports on either the client or the server. A quick way to deal with this is to use the system-config-securitylevel-tui tool. Or better, use a firewall front end such as APF or CSF. These tools also simplify blocking or unblocking IPs.

Firewall Allow Block Unblock
APF apf -a <IP> apf -d <IP> apf -u <IP>
CSF* csf -a <IP> csf -d <IP> csf -dr <IP>

*CSF has a handy search command: csf -g <IP>.

SoftLayer customers should be sure to allow SoftLayer IP ranges through the firewall so we can better support you when you have questions or need help. Beyond blocking and allowing IP addresses, it's also important to lock down the ports on your server. The only open ports on your system should be the ones you want to use. Here's a quick list of some of the most common ports:

cPanel ports

  • 2078 - webDisk
  • 2083 - cPanel control panel
  • 2087 - WHM control panel
  • 2096 - webmail

Other

  • 22 - SSH (secure shell - Linux)
  • 53 - DNS name servers
  • 3389 - RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol - Windows)
  • 8443 - Plesk control panel

Mail Ports

  • 25 - SMTP
  • 110 - POP3
  • 143 - IMAP
  • 465 - SMTPS
  • 993 - IMAPS
  • 995 - POP3S

Web Server Ports

  • 80 - HTTP
  • 443 - HTTPS

DNS

DNS is a naming system for computers and services on the Internet. Domain names like "softlayer.com" and "manage.softlayer.com" are easier to remember than IP address like 66.228.118.53 or even 2607:f0d0:1000:11:1::4 in IPv6. DNS looks up a domain's A record (AAAA record for IPv6), to retrieve its IP address. The opposite of an A record is a PTR record: PTR records resolve an IP address to a domain name.

Hostname
A hostname is the human-readable label you assign of your server to help you differentiate it from your other devices. A hostname should resolve to its server's main IP address, and the IP should resolve back to the hostname via a PTR record. This configuration is extremely important for email ... assuming you don't want all of your emails rejected as spam.

Avoid using "www" at the beginning of a hostname because it may conflict with a website on your server. The hostnames you choose don't have to be dry or boring. I've seen some pretty awesome hostname naming conventions over the years (Simpsons characters, Greek gods, superheros), so if you aren't going to go with a traditional naming convention, you can get creative and have some fun with it. A server's hostname can be changed in the customer portal and in the server's control panel. In cPanel, the hostname can be easily set in "Networking Setup". In Plesk, the hostname is set in "Server Preferences". Without a control panel, you can update the hostname from your operating system (ex. RedHat, Debian)

A Records
If you buy your domain name from SoftLayer, it is automatically added to our nameservers, but if your domain was registered externally, you'll need to go through a few additional steps to ensure your domain resolves correctly on our servers. To include your externally-registered domain on our DNS, you should first point it at our nameservers (ns1.softlayer.com, ns2.softlayer.com). Next, Add a DNS Zone, then add an A record corresponding to the hostname you chose earlier.

PTR Records
Many ISPs configure their servers that receive email to lookup the IP address of the domain in a sender's email address (a reverse DNS check) to see that the domain name matches the email server's host name. You can look up the PTR record for your IP address. In Terminal.app (Mac) or Command Prompt (Windows), type "nslookup" command followed by the IP. If the PTR doesn't match up, you can change the PTR easily.

NSLookup

SSL Certificates

Getting an SSL certificate for your site is optional, but it has many benefits. The certificates will assure your customers that they are looking at your site securely. SSL encrypts passwords and data sent over the network. Any website using SSL Certificates should be assigned its own IP address. For more information, we have a great KnowledgeLayer article about planning ahead for an SSL, and there's plenty of documentation on how to manage SSL certificates in cPanel and Plesk.

Move In!

Now that you've prepared your server and protected your data, you are ready to migrate your content to its new home. Be proactive about monitoring and managing your server once it's in production. These tips aren't meant to be a one-size-fits-all, "set it and forget it" solution; they're simply important aspects to consider when you get started with a new server. You probably noticed that I alluded to control panels quite a few times in this post, and that's for good reason: If you don't feel comfortable with all of the ins and outs of server administration, control panels are extremely valuable resources that do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.

If you have any questions about setting up your new server or you need any help with your SoftLayer account, remember that we're only a phone call away!

-Lyndell

March 19, 2013

iptables Tips and Tricks: CSF Configuration

In our last "iptables Tips and Tricks" installment, we talked about Advanced Policy Firewall (APF) configuration, so it should come as no surprise that in this installment, we're turning our attention to ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF). Before we get started, you should probably run through the list of warnings I include at the top of the APF blog post and make sure you have your Band-Aid ready in case you need it.

To get the ball rolling, we need to download CSF and install it on our server. In this post, we're working with a CentOS 6.0 32-bit server, so our (root) terminal commands would look like this to download and install CSF:

$ wget http://www.configserver.com/free/csf.tgz #Download CSF using wget.
$ tar zxvf csf.tgz #Unpack it.
$ yum install perl-libwww-perl #Make sure perl modules are installed ...
$ yum install perl-Time-HiRes  #Otherwise it will generate an error.
$ cd csf
$ ./install.sh #Install CSF.
 
#MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR BAND-AID READY
 
$ /etc/init.d/csf start #Start CSF. (Note: You can also use '$ service csf start')

Once you start CSF, you can see a list of the default rules that load at startup. CSF defaults to a DROP policy:

$ iptables -nL | grep policy
Chain INPUT (policy DROP)
Chain FORWARD (policy DROP)
Chain OUTPUT (policy DROP)

Don't ever run "iptables -F" unless you want to lock yourself out. In fact, you might want to add "This server is running CSF - do not run 'iptables -F'" to your /etc/motd, just as a reminder/warning to others.

CSF loads on startup by default. This means that if you get locked out, a simple reboot probably won't fix the problem. Runlevels 2, 3, 4, and 5 are all on:

$ chkconfig --list | grep csf
csf             0:off   1:off   2:on    3:on    4:on    5:on    6:off

Some features of CSF will not work unless you have certain iptables modules installed. I believe they are installed by default in CentOS, but if you custom-built your iptables, they might not all be installed. Run this script to see if all modules are installed:

$ /etc/csf/csftest.pl
Testing ip_tables/iptable_filter...OK
Testing ipt_LOG...OK
Testing ipt_multiport/xt_multiport...OK
Testing ipt_REJECT...OK
Testing ipt_state/xt_state...OK
Testing ipt_limit/xt_limit...OK
Testing ipt_recent...OK
Testing xt_connlimit...OK
Testing ipt_owner/xt_owner...OK
Testing iptable_nat/ipt_REDIRECT...OK
Testing iptable_nat/ipt_DNAT...OK
 
RESULT: csf should function on this server

As I mentioned, this is the default iptables installation on a minimal CentOS 6.0 image, so chances are good that these modules are already installed on your system. It never hurts to check, though.

The CSF Configuration File

The primary CSF configuration is stored in the well-documented /etc/csf/csf.conf file. CSF is extremely configurable, so there are a lot of options to read over. Let's take a look over some of the more important features:

Testing

TESTING = "1"
TESTING_INTERVAL = "5"

This TESTING cron job runs every "5" minutes so you don't lock yourself out when you're testing your rules. When you are satisfied with your rules (and confident that you won't lock yourself out), you can set TESTING to "0".

Globally Allowed Ports

# Allow incoming TCP ports
TCP_IN = "20,21,22,25,53,80,110,143,443,465,587,993,995"
 
# Allow outgoing TCP ports
TCP_OUT = "20,21,22,25,53,80,110,113,443"
 
# Allow incoming UDP ports
UDP_IN = "20,21,53"
 
# Allow outgoing UDP ports
# To allow outgoing traceroute add 33434:33523 to this list
UDP_OUT = "20,21,53,113,123"

Incoming Ping Requests

# Allow incoming PING
ICMP_IN = "1"

Allowing ping is usually a good option for diagnostic purposes, so I don't recommend turning it off. Disallowing ping is an example of "security through obscurity," and it will not typically dissuade your attackers.

Ethernet Device

ETH_DEVICE = ""
ETH6_DEVICE = ""

Here, you can configure iptables to ONLY use one Ethernet adapter. You might want to only guard your public network adapter in some situations.

IP Limit in Permanent "Deny" File

DENY_IP_LIMIT = "200"

A higher number here will obviously screen out more IP addresses in csf.deny, but higher numbers also may cause slowdowns.

IP Limit in Temporary "Deny" File

DENY_TEMP_IP_LIMIT = "100"

Similar to DENY_IP_LIMIT, the DENY_TEMP_IP_LIMIT represents the maximum number of IPs that can be stored in the temporary ban list.

SMTP Blocking

SMTP_BLOCK = "0"

When set to "1", SMTP_BLOCK does not completely block outbound SMTP, but it does block it for most users. This will prevent malicious scripts and compromised users from making outbound connections from unauthorized mail clients on the server. SMTP_BLOCK doesn't stop those scripts from running, but it does stop them from functioning. Mail sent through the proper channels will still be delivered normally.

Allowing SMTP on localhost

SMTP_ALLOWLOCAL = "1"

Custom Mail Port Designation

SMTP_PORTS = "25,465,587"

Allowing SMTP Access to Users/Groups

SMTP_ALLOWUSER = ""
SMTP_ALLOWGROUP = "mail,mailman"

SYN Flood Protection

SYNFLOOD = "0"
SYNFLOOD_RATE = "100/s"
SYNFLOOD_BURST = "150"

Per the documentation, you should only enable SYN flood protection (SYNFLOOD= "1") if you are currently under a SYN flood attack.

Concurrent Connections Limit

CONNLIMIT = "22;5,80;20"
PORTFLOOD = "22;tcp;5;300,80;tcp;20;5

These options allow you to add customized DoS protection. CONNLIMIT handles the number of concurrent connections, and in this example, we're limiting port 22 to 5 connections and port 80 to 20 connections.

PORTFLOOD watches the number of connections per a given number of seconds. In this example, we're limiting the TCP connection on port 22 to 5 connections/second with a quiet period of 300 seconds before the connection is unblocked. Additonally, we're limiting the TCP connection on port 80 to 20 connections/second with a quiet period of 5 seconds before the connection is unblocked.

Check the readme.txt file for more information about the syntax.

Logging to Syslog

SYSLOG = "0"

When enabled, this option logs lfd (Login Failure Daemon) messages to syslog as well as to /var/log/lfd.log.

Dropping v. Rejecting Packets

DROP = "DROP"

This configuration allows you to either DROP or REJECT packets. REJECT tells the sender that the packet has been blocked by the firewall. DROP just drops the packet and does not send a response. I like DROP better for regular use, but REJECT might be more helpful if you need to diagnose a connectivity issue.

Logging Dropped Connections

DROP_LOGGING = "1"

This option logs dropped connections to syslog. I don't see any reason to turn this off unless your hard drive is getting full.

Port Exceptions When Logging Dropped Connections

DROP_NOLOG = "67,68,111,113,135:139,445,500,513,520"

These ports are specifically blocked from being logged either to conserve hard drive space or make the log file easier to read.

"Watch Mode"

WATCH_MODE = "0"

If you are ever stuck trying to troubleshoot a large ruleset, you might consider turning this option on. You can use it to track the actions to watched IP addresses to see where they are getting blocked or accepted.

Login Failure Daemon Alert

LF_ALERT_TO = ""
LF_ALERT_FROM = ""
LF_ALERT_SMTP = ""

You can specify an email address to report errors from the Login Failure Daemon, which tracks and automatically blocks brute force login attempts.

Permanent Blocks and NetBlocks

LF_PERMBLOCK = "1"
LF_PERMBLOCK_INTERVAL = "86400"
LF_PERMBLOCK_COUNT = "4"
LF_PERMBLOCK_ALERT = "1"
LF_NETBLOCK = "0"
LF_NETBLOCK_INTERVAL = "86400"
LF_NETBLOCK_COUNT = "4"
LF_NETBLOCK_CLASS = "C"
LF_NETBLOCK_ALERT = "1"

These settings control the permanent block and netblock blocking. You probably don't need to touch these settings, but you might want some additional security or less security depending on your company needs. If something gets permablocked, it will require your intervention to clear it, which might create downtime for your clients. Likewise, if a legitimate IP address happens to be part of a netblock which has an attacking IP address on it, it will get blocked if you have that feature turned on. A class C network encompasses 256 IP addresses. You can set this to class B or A, but that could block thousands or millions of IP addresses, respectively. Unless you find yourself under constant attack, I would advise you to leave that LF_NETBLOCK off.

Additional Protection During Updates

# Safe Chain Update. If enabled, all dynamic update chains (GALLOW*, GDENY*,
# SPAMHAUS, DSHIELD, BOGON, CC_ALLOW, CC_DENY, ALLOWDYN*) will create a new
# chain when updating, and insert it into the relevant LOCALINPUT/LOCALOUTPUT
# chain, then flush and delete the old dynamic chain and rename the new chain.
#
# This prevents a small window of opportunity opening when an update occurs and
# the dynamic chain is flushed for the new rules.
SAFECHAINUPDATE = "0"

Activating this option will increase your system resource usage and will require more rules to be running at one time, but it provides an additional layer of protection during updates. Without this option turned on, your rules will be flushed for a short amount of time, leaving your server vulnerable.

Multi-Server Deployment Options

LF_GLOBAL = "0"
GLOBAL_ALLOW = ""
GLOBAL_DENY = ""
GLOBAL_IGNORE = ""

Like APF, you can configure global lists for multiple server deployments. You'll need to specify a URL of the text file with the IP addresses for the global lists.

SPAMHAUSE Blocklist

LF_SPAMHAUS = "0"

This option enables the SPAMHAUS blocklist. Specify the number of seconds between refreshes. Recommended setting is 86400 (1 day).

Blocking TOR Exit IP Addresses

LF_TOR = "0"

Enabling this option will block TOR exit IP addresses. If you are not familiar with TOR, it is a completely anonymous proxy network. This could block some legitimate users who are trying to protect their anonymity, so I would recommend only turning this on if you are already under attack from a TOR exit address.

Blocking Bogon Addresses

LF_BOGON = "0"
LF_BOGON_URL = "http://www.cymru.com/Documents/bogon-bn-agg.txt"
LF_BOGON_SKIP = ""

Blocking bogon addresses (addresses that should not be possible) is usually a good decision. To enable, set the number of seconds between refreshes. I recommend enabling this option and setting the refresh at 86400 (1 day). If you do so, be sure to add your private network adapters to the skip list.

Country-Specific Access to Your Server

CC_DENY = ""
CC_ALLOW = ""

With these options, you can block or allow entire countries from accessing your server. To do so, enter the country codes in a comma separated list. Even though this generates a lot of additional rules, it's valuable to some sysadmins.

CC_ALLOW_FILTER = ""

Alternatively, you can set your server to exclusively accept traffic from a list of country codes. All other countries not listed will have their traffic dropped. There are many other settings related to these options that I don't have time to cover in this blog.

Blocking Login Failures

LF_TRIGGER = "0"

This enables blocking of login failures (per service). There are a lot of great customization options in this section.

Scanning Directories for Malicious Files

LF_DIRWATCH = "300"

This feature scans /tmp and /dev/shm for potentially malicious files and alerts you to their presence based on the interval you designate. You can also have CSF automatically quarantine malicious files with this option:

LF_DIRWATCH_DISABLE = "0"

Distributed Attack Protection

LF_DISTATTACK = "0"

By enabling this option, you activate additional protection against distributed attacks.

Blocking Based on Abusive Email Usage

LT_POP3D = "0"
LT_IMAPD = "0"

If a user checks email too many times per hour (more than the non-zero value specified), the user's IP address is blocked.

Email Alert Following Block

LT_EMAIL_ALERT = "1"

This will send you email when something is blocked. I'd recommend leaving it on.

Blocking IP Addresses Based on Number of Connections

CT_LIMIT = "0"

This feature tracks connections and blocks the IP if the number of connections is too high. Use caution because if you enable this option and set this value too low, it will block legitimate traffic.

Application-Level Protection

PT_LIMIT = "60"

This feature provides application level protection against malicious scripts that take a long time to execute.

Blocking Port Scanners

PS_INTERVAL = "300"
PS_LIMIT = "10"

Enabling HTML User Interface for CSF

UI = "0"

CSF has a built-in HTML user interface. You can enable this by setting UI = "1". There are a list of prerequisites for this option in the readme.txt.

Notifying Blocked IP Addresses

MESSENGER = "0"

This option will notify blocked IP addresses when they have been blocked by the firewall.

Port Knocking

PORTKNOCKING = ""

CSF supports port knocking, which is a technique that provides an additional layer of security. See http://www.portknocking.org/ for details.

Allow and Deny Lists

As we walked through the CSF configuration file, you saw that I referenced the csf.deny file, so it should come as no surprise that CSF also includes csf.allow to customize "allow" rules as well. If you are familiar with APF, these files have a very similar syntax ... Each entry is made up of the same four components: protocol|flow|port|IP. The only real difference being that APF uses the colon as a delimiter while CSF uses the pipe:

#APF Version
tcp:in:d=48000_48020:s=10.0.0.0/8
 
#CSF Version
tcp|in|d=48000_48020|s=10.0.0.0/8

Fortunately, replacing your colon with a pipe is a minimally invasive procedure that can be automated with a tool like vi.

CSF Command Line Tool

The command line tool for CSF is much more robust than the one for APF:

$ csf --help
csf: v5.79 (cPanel)
 
ConfigServer Security &amp; Firewall
(c)2006-2013, Way to the Web Limited (http://www.configserver.com)
 
Usage: /usr/sbin/csf [option] [value]
 
Option              Meaning
-h, --help          Show this message
-l, --status        List/Show iptables configuration
-l6, --status6      List/Show ip6tables configuration
-s, --start         Start firewall rules
-f, --stop          Flush/Stop firewall rules (Note: lfd may restart csf)
-r, --restart       Restart firewall rules
-q, --startq        Quick restart (csf restarted by lfd)
-sf, --startf       Force CLI restart regardless of LF_QUICKSTART setting
-a, --add ip        Allow an IP and add to /etc/csf.allow
-ar, --addrm ip     Remove an IP from /etc/csf.allow and delete rule
-d, --deny ip       Deny an IP and add to /etc/csf.deny
-dr, --denyrm ip    Unblock an IP and remove from /etc/csf.deny
-df, --denyf        Remove and unblock all entries in /etc/csf.deny
-g, --grep ip       Search the iptables rules for an IP match (incl. CIDR)
-t, --temp          Displays the current list of temp IP entries and their TTL
-tr, --temprm ip    Remove an IPs from the temp IP ban and allow list
-td, --tempdeny ip ttl [-p port] [-d direction]
                    Add an IP to the temp IP ban list. ttl is how long to
                    blocks for (default:seconds, can use one suffix of h/m/d).
                    Optional port. Optional direction of block can be one of:
                    in, out or inout (default:in)
-ta, --tempallow ip ttl [-p port] [-d direction]
                    Add an IP to the temp IP allow list (default:inout)
-tf, --tempf        Flush all IPs from the temp IP entries
-cp, --cping        PING all members in an lfd Cluster
-cd, --cdeny ip     Deny an IP in a Cluster and add to /etc/csf.deny
-ca, --callow ip    Allow an IP in a Cluster and add to /etc/csf.allow
-cr, --crm ip       Unblock an IP in a Cluster and remove from /etc/csf.deny
-cc, --cconfig [name] [value]
                    Change configuration option [name] to [value] in a Cluster
-cf, --cfile [file] Send [file] in a Cluster to /etc/csf/
-crs, --crestart    Cluster restart csf and lfd
-w, --watch ip      Log SYN packets for an IP across iptables chains
-m, --mail [addr]   Display Server Check in HTML or email to [addr] if present
-lr, --logrun       Initiate Log Scanner report via lfd
-c, --check         Check for updates to csf but do not upgrade
-u, --update        Check for updates to csf and upgrade if available
-uf                 Force an update of csf
-x, --disable       Disable csf and lfd
-e, --enable        Enable csf and lfd if previously disabled
-v, --version       Show csf version

The command line tool will also tell you if the testing mode is enabled (which is a very useful feature). If TESTING were enabled, we'd see this line at the bottom of the output:

*WARNING* TESTING mode is enabled - do not forget to disable it in the configuration

Did you make it all the way through?! Great! I know it's a lot to take in, but it's not terribly complicated when we break it down and understand how each piece works. Next time, I'll be back with some tips on integrating CSF into cPanel.

-Mark

January 29, 2013

iptables Tips and Tricks: APF (Advanced Policy Firewall) Configuration

Let's talk about APF. APF — Advanced Policy Firewall — is a policy-based iptables firewall system that provides simple, powerful control over your day-to-day server security. It might seem intimidating to be faced with all of the features and configuration tools in APF, but this blog should put your fears to rest.

APF is an iptables wrapper that works alongside iptables and extends its functionality. I personally don't use iptables wrappers, but I have a lot of experience with them, and I've seen that they do offer some additional features that streamline policy management. For example, by employing APF, you'll get several simple on/off toggles (set via configuration files) that make some complex iptables configurations available without extensive coding requirements. The flip-side of a wrapper's simplicity is that you aren't directly in control of the iptables commands, so if something breaks it might take longer to diagnose and repair. Before you add a wrapper like APF, be sure that you know what you are getting into. Here are a few points to consider:

  • Make sure that what you're looking to use adds a feature you need but cannot easily incorporate with iptables on its own.
  • You need to know how to effectively enable and disable the iptables wrapper (the correct way ... read the manual!), and you should always have a trusted failsafe iptables ruleset handy in the unfortunate event that something goes horribly wrong and you need to disable the wrapper.
  • Learn about the basic configurations and rule changes you can apply via the command line. You'll need to understand the way your wrapper takes rules because it may differ from the way iptables handles rules.
  • You can't manually configure your iptables rules once you have your wrapper in place (or at least you shouldn't).
  • Be sure to know how to access your server via the IPMI management console so that if you completely lock yourself out beyond repair, you can get back in. You might even go so far as to have a script or set of instructions ready for tech support to run, in the event that you can't get in via the management console.

TL;DR: Have a Band-Aid ready!

APF Configuration

Now that you have been sufficiently advised about the potential challenges of using a wrapper (and you've got your Band-Aid ready), we can check out some of the useful APF rules that make iptables administration a lot easier. Most of the configuration for APF is in conf.apf. This file handles the default behavior, but not necessarily the specific blocking rules, and when we make any changes to the configuration, we'll need to restart the APF service for the changes to take effect.

Let's jump into conf.apf and break down what we see. The first code snippit is fairly self-explanatory. It's another way to make sure you don't lock yourself out of your server as you are making configuration changes and testing them:

# !!! Do not leave set to (1) !!!
# When set to enabled; 5 minute cronjob is set to stop the firewall. Set
# this off (0) when firewall is determined to be operating as desired.
DEVEL_MODE="1"

The next configuration options we'll look at are where you can make quick high-level changes if you find that legitimate traffic is being blocked and you want to make APF a little more lenient:

# This controls the amount of violation hits an address must have before it
# is blocked. It is a good idea to keep this very low to prevent evasive
# measures. The default is 0 or 1, meaning instant block on first violation.
RAB_HITCOUNT="1"
 
# This is the amount of time (in seconds) that an address gets blocked for if
# a violation is triggered, the default is 300s (5 minutes).
RAB_TIMER="300"
# This allows RAB to 'trip' the block timer back to 0 seconds if an address
# attempts ANY subsiquent communication while still on the inital block period.
RAB_TRIP="1"
 
# This controls if the firewall should log all violation hits from an address.
# The use of LOG_DROP variable set to 1 will override this to force logging.
RAB_LOG_HIT="1"
 
# This controls if the firewall should log all subsiqent traffic from an address
# that is already blocked for a violation hit, this can generate allot of logs.
# The use of LOG_DROP variable set to 1 will override this to force logging.
RAB_LOG_TRIP="0"

Next, we have an option to adjust ICMP flood protection. This protection should be useful against some forms of DoS attacks, and the associated rules show up in your INPUT chain:

# Set a reasonable packet/time ratio for ICMP packets, exceeding this flow
# will result in dropped ICMP packets. Supported values are in the form of:
# pkt/s (packets/seconds), pkt/m (packets/minutes)
# Set value to 0 for unlimited, anything above is enabled.
ICMP_LIM="30/s"

If you wanted to add more ports to block for p2p traffic (which will show up in the P2P chain), you'll update this code:

# A common set of known Peer-To-Peer (p2p) protocol ports that are often
# considered undesirable traffic on public Internet servers. These ports
# are also often abused on web hosting servers where clients upload p2p
# client agents for the purpose of distributing or downloading pirated media.
# Format is comma separated for single ports and an underscore separator for
# ranges (4660_4678).
BLK_P2P_PORTS="1214,2323,4660_4678,6257,6699,6346,6347,6881_6889,6346,7778"

The next few lines let you designate the ports that you want to have closed at all times. They will be blocked for INPUT and OUTPUT chains:

# These are common Internet service ports that are understood in the wild
# services you would not want logged under normal circumstances. All ports
# that are defined here will be implicitly dropped with no logging for
# TCP/UDP traffic inbound or outbound. Format is comma separated for single
# ports and an underscore separator for ranges (135_139).
BLK_PORTS="135_139,111,513,520,445,1433,1434,1234,1524,3127"

The next important section to look at deals with conntrack. If you get "conntrack full" errors, this is where you'd increase the allowed connections. It's not uncommon to need more connections than the default, so if you need to adjust that value, you'd do it here:

# This is the maximum number of "sessions" (connection tracking entries) that
# can be handled simultaneously by the firewall in kernel memory. Increasing
# this value too high will simply waste memory - setting it too low may result
# in some or all connections being refused, in particular during denial of
# service attacks.
SYSCTL_CONNTRACK="65536"

We've talked about the ports we want closed at all times, so it only makes sense that we'd specify which ports we want open for all interfaces:

# Common inbound (ingress) TCP ports
IG_TCP_CPORTS="22"
# Common inbound (ingress) UDP ports
IG_UDP_CPORTS=""
# Common outbound (egress) TCP ports
EG_TCP_CPORTS="21,25,80,443,43"
# Common outbound (egress) UDP ports
EG_UDP_CPORTS="20,21,53"

And when we want a special port allowance for specific users, we can declare it easily. For example, if we want port 22 open for user ID 0, we'd use this code:

# Allow outbound access to destination port 22 for uid 0
EG_TCP_UID="0:22"

The next few sections on Remote Rule Imports and Global Trust are a little more specialized, and I encourage you to read a little more about them (since there's so much to them and not enough space to cover them here on the blog). An important feature of APF is that it imports block lists from outside sources to keep you safe from some attackers, so the Remote Rule Imports can prove to be very useful. The Global Trust section is incredibly useful for multi-server deployments of APF. Here, you can set up your global allow/block lists and have them all pull from a central location so that you can make a single update to the source and have the update propogated to all servers in your configuration. These changes are synced to the glob_allow/deny.rules files, and they will be downloaded (and overwritten) on a regular basis from your specified source, so don't make any manual edits in glob_allow/deny.rules.

As you can see, apf.conf is no joke. It has a lot of stuff going on, but it's very straightforward and documented well. Once we've set up apf.conf with the configurations we need, it's time to look at the more focused allow_hosts.rules and deny_hosts.rules files. These .rules files are where where you put your typical firewall rules in place. If there's one piece of advice I can give you about these configurations, it would be to check if your traffic is already allowed or blocked. Having multiple rules that do the same thing (possibly in different places) is confusing and potentially dangerous.

The deny_hosts.rules configuration will look just like allow_hosts.rules, but it's performing the opposite function. Let's check out an allow_hosts.rules configuration that will allow the Nimsoft service to function:

tcp:in:d=48000_48020:s=10.0.0.0/8
tcp:out:d=48000_48020:d=10.0.0.0/8

The format is somewhat simplistic, but the file gives a little more context in the comments:

# The trust rules can be made in advanced format with 4 options
# (proto:flow:port:ip);
# 1) protocol: [packet protocol tcp/udp]
# 2) flow in/out: [packet direction, inbound or outbound]
# 3) s/d=port: [packet source or destination port]
# 4) s/d=ip(/xx) [packet source or destination address, masking supported]
# Syntax:
# proto:flow:[s/d]=port:[s/d]=ip(/mask)

APF also uses ds_hosts.rules to load the DShield.org blocklist, and I assume the ecnshame_hosts.rules does something similar (can't find much information about it), so you won't need to edit these files manually. Additionally, you probably don't need to make any changes to log.rules, unless you want to make changes to what exactly you log. As it stands, it logs certain dropped connections, which should be enough. Also, it might be worth noting that this file is a script, not a configuration file.

The last two configuration files are the preroute.rules and postroute.rules that (unsurprisingly) are used to make routing changes. If you have been following my articles, this corresponds to the iptables chains for PREROUTING and POSTROUTING where you would do things like port forwarding and other advanced configuration that you probably don't want to do in most cases.

APF Command Line Management

As I mentioned in the "points to consider" at the top of this post, it's important to learn the changes you can perform from the command line, and APF has some very useful command line tools:

[root@server]# apf --help
APF version 9.7 <apf@r-fx.org>
Copyright (C) 2002-2011, R-fx Networks <proj@r-fx.org>
Copyright (C) 2011, Ryan MacDonald <ryan@r-fx.org>
This program may be freely redistributed under the terms of the GNU GPL
 
usage /usr/local/sbin/apf [OPTION]
-s|--start ......................... load all firewall rules
-r|--restart ....................... stop (flush) &amp; reload firewall rules
-f|--stop........ .................. stop (flush) all firewall rules
-l|--list .......................... list all firewall rules
-t|--status ........................ output firewall status log
-e|--refresh ....................... refresh &amp; resolve dns names in trust rules
-a HOST CMT|--allow HOST COMMENT ... add host (IP/FQDN) to allow_hosts.rules and
                                     immediately load new rule into firewall
-d HOST CMT|--deny HOST COMMENT .... add host (IP/FQDN) to deny_hosts.rules and
                                     immediately load new rule into firewall
-u|--remove HOST ................... remove host from [glob]*_hosts.rules
                                     and immediately remove rule from firewall
-o|--ovars ......................... output all configuration options

You can use these command line tools to turn your firewall on and off, add allowed or blocked hosts and display troubleshooting information. These commands are very easy to use, but if you want more fine-tuned control, you'll need to edit the configuration files directly (as we looked at above).

I know it seems like a lot of information, but to a large extent, that's all you need to know to get started with APF. Take each section slowly and understand what each configuration file is doing, and you'll master APF in no time at all.

-Mark

March 5, 2012

iptables Tips and Tricks - Not Locking Yourself Out

The iptables tool is one of the simplest, most powerful tools you can use to protect your server. We've covered port redirection, rule processing and troubleshooting in previous installments to this "Tips and Tricks" series, but what happens when iptables turns against you and locks you out of your own system?

Getting locked out of a production server can cost both time and money, so it's worth your time to avoid this. If you follow the correct procedures, you can safeguard yourself from being firewalled off of your server. Here are seven helpful tips to help you keep your sanity and prevent you from locking yourself out.

Tip 1: Keep a safe ruleset handy.

If you are starting with a working ruleset, or even if you are trying to troubleshoot an existing ruleset, take a backup of your iptables configuration before you ever start working on it.

iptables-save > /root/iptables-safe

Then if you do something that prevents your website from working, you can quickly restore it.

iptables-restore

Tip 2: Create a cron script that will reload to your safe ruleset every minute during testing.

This was pointed out to my by a friend who swears by this method. Just write a quick bash script and set a cron entry that will reload it back to the safe set every minute. You'll have to test quickly, but it will keep you from getting locked out.

Tip 3: Have the IPMI KVM ready.

SoftLayer-pod servers* are equipped with some sort of remote access device. Most of them have a KVM console. You will want to have your VPN connection set up, connected and the KVM window up. You can't paste to and from the KVM, so SSH is typically easier to work with, but it will definitely cut down on the downtime if something does go wrong.

*This may not apply to servers that were originally provisioned under another company name.

Tip 4: Try to avoid generic rules.

The more criteria you specify in the rule, the less chance you will have of locking yourself out. I would liken this to a pie. A specific rule is a very thin slice of the pie.

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -s 10.0.0.0/8 -d 123.123.123.123 -j DROP

But if you block port 22 from any to any, it's a very large slice.

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j DROP

There are plenty of ways that you can be more specific. For example, using "-i eth0" will limit the processing to a single NIC in your server. This way, it will not apply the rule to eth1.

Tip 5: Whitelist your IP address at the top of your ruleset.

This may make testing more difficult unless you have a secondary offsite test server, but this is a very effective method of not getting locked out.

iptables -I INPUT -s <your IP> -j ACCEPT

You need to put this as the FIRST rule in order for it to work properly ("-I" inserts it as the first rule, whereas "-A" appends it to the end of the list).

Tip 6: Know and understand all of the rules in your current configuration.

Not making the mistake in the first place is half the battle. If you understand the inner workings behind your iptables ruleset, it will make your life easier. Draw a flow chart if you must.

Tip 7: Understand the way that iptables processes rules.

Remember, the rules start at the top of the chain and go down, unless specified otherwise. Crack open the iptables man page and learn about the options you are using.

-Mark

January 9, 2012

iptables Tips and Tricks – Troubleshooting Rulesets

One of the most time consuming tasks with iptables is troubleshooting a problematic ruleset. That will not change no matter how much experience you have with it. However, with the right mindset, this task becomes considerably easier.

If you missed my last installment about iptables rule processing, here's a crash course:

  1. The rules start at the top, and proceed down, one by one unless otherwise directed.
  2. A rule must match exactly.
  3. Once iptables has accepted, rejected, or dropped a packet, it will not process any further rules on it.

There are essentially two things that you will be troubleshooting with iptables ... Either it's not accepting traffic and it should be OR it's accepting traffic and it shouldn't be. If the server is intermittently blocking or accepting traffic, that may take some additional troubleshooting, and it may not even be related to iptables.

Keep in mind what you are looking for, and don't jump to any conclusions. Troubleshooting iptables takes patience and time, and there shouldn't be any guesswork involved. If you have a configuration of 800 rules, you should expect to need to look through every single rule until you find the rule that is causing your problems.

Before you begin troubleshooting, you first need to know some information about the traffic:

  1. What is the source IP address or range that is having difficulty connecting?
  2. What is the destination IP address or website IP?
  3. What is the port or port range affected, or what type of traffic is it (TCP, ICMP, etc.)?
  4. Is it supposed to be accepted or blocked?

Those bits of information should be all you need to begin troubleshooting a buggy ruleset, except in some rare cases that are outside the scope of this article.

Here are some things to keep in mind (especially if you did not program every rule by hand):

  • iptables has three built in chains. These are for INPUT – the traffic coming in to the server, OUTPUT – the traffic coming out of the server, and FORWARD – traffic that is not destined to or coming from the server (usually only used when iptable is acting as a firewall for other servers). You will start your troubleshooting at the top of one of these three chains, depending on the type of traffic.
  • The "target" is the action that is taken when the rule matches. This may be another custom chain, so if you see a rule with another chain as the target that matches exactly, be sure to step through every rule in that chain as well. In the following example, you will see the BLACKLIST2 sub-chain that applies to traffic on port 80. If traffic comes through on port 80, it will be diverted to this other chain.
  • The RETURN target indicates that you should return to the parent chain. If you see a rule that matches with a RETURN target, stop all your troubleshooting on the current chain, and return the rule directly after the rule that referenced the custom chain.
  • If there are no matching rules, the chain policy is applied.
  • There may be rules in the "nat," "mangle" or "raw" tables that are blocking or diverting your traffic. Typically, all the rules will be in the "filter" table, but you might run into situations where this is not the case. Try running this to check: iptables -t mangle -nL ; iptables -t nat -nL ; iptables -t raw -nL
  • Be cognisant of the policy. If the policy is ACCEPT, all traffic that does not match a rule will be accepted. Conversely, if the policy is DROP or REJECT, all traffic that does not match a rule will be blocked.
  • My goal with this article is to introduce you to the algorithm by which you can troubleshoot a more complex ruleset. It is intentionally left simple, but you should still follow through even when the answer may be obvious.

Here is an example ruleset that I will be using for an example:

Chain INPUT (policy DROP)
target prot opt source destination
BLACKLIST2 tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:80
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:50
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:53
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:22
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:1010

Chain BLACKLIST2 (1 references)
target prot opt source destination
REJECT * -- 123.123.123.123 0.0.0.0/0
REJECT * -- 45.34.234.234 0.0.0.0/0
ACCEPT * -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0

Here is the problem: Your server is accepting SSH traffic to anyone, and you wish to only allow SSH to your IP – 111.111.111.111. We know that this is inbound traffic, so this will affect the INPUT chain.

We are looking for:

source IP: any
destination IP: any
protocol: tcp
port: 22

Step 1: The first rule denotes any source IP and and destination IP on destination port 80. Since this is regarding port 22, this rule does not match, so we'll continue to the next rule. If the traffic here was on port 80, it would invoke the BLACKLIST2 sub chain.
Step 2: The second rule denotes any source IP and any destination IP on destination port 50. Since this is regarding port 22, this rule does not match, so let's continue on.
Step 3: The third rule denotes any source IP and any destination IP on destination port 53. Since this is regarding port 22, this rule does not match, so let's continue on.
Step 4: The fourth rule denotes any source IP and any destination IP on destination port 22. Since this is regarding port 22, this rule matches exactly. The target ACCEPT is applied to the traffic. We found the problem, and now we need to construct a solution. I will be showing you the Redhat method of doing this.

Do this to save the running ruleset as a file:

iptables-save > current-iptables-rules

Then edit the current-iptables-rules file in your favorite editor, and find the rule that looks like this:

-A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT

Then you can modify this to only apply to your IP address (the source, or "-s", IP address).

-A INPUT -p tcp -s 111.111.111.111 --dport 22 -j ACCEPT

Once you have this line, you will need to load the iptables configuration from this file for testing.

iptables-restore < current-iptables-rules

Don't directly edit the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file as this might lock you out of your server. It is good practice to test a configuration before saving to the system configuration files. This way, if you do get locked out, you can reboot your server and it will be working. The ruleset should look like this now:

Chain INPUT (policy DROP)
target prot opt source destination
BLACKLIST2 tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:80
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:50
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:53
ACCEPT tcp -- 111.111.111.111 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:22
ACCEPT tcp -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 tcp dpt:1010

Chain BLACKLIST2 (1 references)
target prot opt source destination
REJECT * -- 123.123.123.123 0.0.0.0/0
REJECT * -- 45.34.234.234 0.0.0.0/0
ACCEPT * -- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0

The policy of "DROP" will now block any other connection on port 22. Remember, the rule must match exactly, so the rule on port 22 now *ONLY* applies if the IP address is 111.111.111.111.

Once you have confirmed that the rule is behaving properly (be sure to test from another IP address to confirm that you are not able to connect), you can write the system configuration:

service iptables save

If this troubleshooting sounds boring and repetitive, you are right. However, this is the secret to solid iptables troubleshooting. As I said earlier, there is no guesswork involved. Just take it step by step, make sure the rule matches exactly, and follow it through till you find the rule that is causing the problem. This method may not be fast, but it's reliable. You'll look like an expert in no time.

-Mark

January 5, 2012

iptables Tips and Tricks - Rule Processing

As I mentioned in "iptables Tips and Tricks - Port Redirection," iptables is probably a complete mystery to a lot of users, and one the biggest hurdles is understanding the method by which it filters traffic ... Once you understand this, you'll be able to tame the beast.

When I think of iptables, the best analogy that comes to mind is a gravity coin sorting bank with four rules and one policy. If you're not familiar with a gravity coin sorting bank, each coin is starts at the same place and slides down an declined plane until it can fall into it's appropriate tube:

iptables Rule Sorter

As you can see, once a coin starts down the path, there are four rules – each one "filtering traffic" based on the width of the coin in millimeters (Quarter = 25mm, Nickel = 22mm, Penny = 20mm, Dime = 18mm). Due to possible inconsistencies in the coins, the tube widths are slightly larger than the official sizes of each coin to prevent jamming. At the end of the line, if a coin didn't fit in any of the tubes, it's dropped out of the sorter.

As we use this visualization to apply to iptables, there are three important things to remember:

  1. The rules start at the top, and proceed down, one by one unless otherwise directed.
  2. A rule must match exactly.
  3. Once iptables has accepted, rejected, or dropped a packet, it will not process any further rules on it.

Let's jump back to the coin sorter. What would happen if you introduced a 23mm coin (slightly larger than a nickel)? What would happen if you introduced a 17mm coin (smaller than a dime)? What would happen if you dropped in a $1 coin @ 26.5mm?

In the first scenario, the coin would enter into the rule processing by being dropped in at the top. It would first pass by the dime slot, which requires a diameter of less than 18mm. It passes by the pennies slot as well, which requires less than 20mm. It continues past the nickels slot, which requires 22mm or less. It will then be "accepted" into the quarters slot, and there will be no further "processing" on the coin.

The iptables rules might look something like this:

Chain INPUT (policy DROP)
target prot opt source destination
ACCEPT all --- 0.0.0.0/00.0.0.0/0width ACCEPT all --- 0.0.0.0/00.0.0.0/0width ACCEPT all --- 0.0.0.0/00.0.0.0/0width ACCEPT all --- 0.0.0.0/00.0.0.0/0width

It's important to remember that once iptables has accepted, rejected, or dropped a packet, it will not process any further rules on it. In the second scenario (17mm coin), the coin would only be processed through the first rule; the other 3 rules would not be used even though the coin would meet their rules as well. Just because a port or and IP address is allowed somewhere in a chain, if a matching rule has dropped the packet, no further rules will be processed.

The final scenario (26.5mm coin) outlines a situation where none of the rules match, and this indicates that the policy will be used. In the coin bank example, it would be physically dropped off the side of the bank. iptables keeps a tally of the number of packets dropped and the corresponding size of the data. You can view this data by using the "iptables -vnL" command.

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT 3418K packets, 380M bytes)

cPanel even uses this tally functionality to track bandwidth usage (You may have seen the "acctboth" chain - this is used for tracking usage per IP).

So there you have it: iptables is just like a gravity coin sorting bank!

-Mark

December 26, 2011

iptables Tips and Tricks - Port Redirection

One of the most challenging and rewarding aspects of Linux administration is the iptables firewall. To the unenlightened, this can be a confusing black box that breaks your web server and blocks your favorite visitors from viewing your content at the most inconvenient times. This blog is the first in a series aimed at clarifying this otherwise mysterious force at work in your server.

Nothing compares with the frustration of trying to make a program listen on a different port – like if you wanted to configure your mail client to listen on port 2525. Many times, configuring a program the hard way (some would say the "correct" way) using configuration files may not be worth your time and effort ... Especially if the server is running on a control panel that does not natively support this functionality.

Fortunately, iptables offers an elegant solution:

iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 2525 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 25

What this does:

  1. This specifies -t nat to indicate the nat table. Typically rules are added to the "filter" table (if you do not specify another table), and this is where the majority of the traffic is handled. In this case, however, we require the use of the nat table.
  2. This rules appends (-A), which means to add the rule at the bottom of the list.
  3. This rule is added to the PREROUTING chain.
  4. For the tcp protocol (-p tcp)
  5. The destination port (--dport) is 2525 - this is the port that the client is trying to access on your server.
  6. The traffic is jumped (-j) to the REDIRECT action. This is the action that is taken when the rule matches.
  7. The port is redirected to port 25 on the server.

As you can see, by changing the protocol to either tcp or udp or by adjusting the dport number and the to-ports number, you can redirect any port incoming to any listening port on the server. Just remember that the dport is the port the client machine is trying to connect to (the port they configure in the mail client, for example).

But check this out: Say for example you have a website (shocking, I know). You don't have a load balancer or a firewall set up, but you want to split off your email traffic to a second server to reduce strain on your web server. Essentially, you want to take incoming port 25 and redirect it ... to ANOTHER SERVER. With iptables, you can make this work:

iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp -d 123.123.123.123 --dport 25 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.10.10.10:25

What this does:

  1. It specifies a destination (-d) IP address. This is not needed, but if you want to limit the email redirection to a single address, this is how you can do it.
  2. It is jumped to DNAT, which stands for destination nat.
  3. The destination and port are specified as arguments on to-destination

As you can see, this forwards all traffic on port 25 to an internal IP address.

Now, say you want to redirect from a different incoming port to a port on another server:

iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 5001 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.10.10.10:25
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -p tcp --dport 25 -j MASQUERADE

In this example, the incoming port is different, so we need to change it back to the standard port on the way back out through the primary server.

If you would like further reading on this topic, I recommend this great tutorial:
http://www.karlrupp.net/en/computer/nat_tutorial

Remember, when you are modifying your running configuration of iptables, you will still need to save your changes in order for it to persist on reboot. Be sure to test your configuration before saving it with "service iptables save" so that you don't lock yourself out.

-Mark

September 27, 2011

The Challenges of Cloud Security Below 10,000 Feet

This guest blog was contributed by Wendy Nather, Research Director, Enterprise Security Practice at The 451 Group. Her post comes on the heels of the highly anticipated launch of StillSecure's Cloud SMS, and it provides some great context for the importance of security in the cloud. For more information about Cloud SMS, visit www.stillsecure.com and follow the latest updates on StillSecure's blog, The Security Samurai.

If you're a large enterprise, you're in pretty good shape for the cloud: you know what kind of security you want and need, you have security staff who can validate what you're getting from the provider, and you can hold up your end of the deal – since it takes both customer and provider working together to build a complete security program. Most of the security providers out there are building for you, because that's where the money is; and they're eager to work on scaling up to meet the requirements for your big business. If you want custom security clauses in a contract, chances are, you'll get them.

But at the other end of the scale there are the cloud customers I refer to as being "below the security poverty line." These are the small shops (like your doctor's medical practice) that may not have an IT staff at all. These small businesses tend to be very dependent on third party providers, and when it comes to security, they have no way to know what they need. Do they really need DLP, a web application firewall, single sign-on, log management, and all the premium security bells and whistles? Even if you gave them a free appliance or a dedicated firewall VM, they wouldn't know what to do with it or have anyone to run it.

And when a small business has only a couple of servers in a decommissioned restroom*, the provider may be able to move them to their cloud, but it may not be able to scale a security solution down far enough to make it simple to run and cost-effective for either side. This is the great challenge today: to make cloud security both effective and affordable, both above and below 10,000 feet, no matter whether you're flying a jumbo airliner or a Cessna.

-Wendy Nather, The 451 Group

*True story. I had to run some there.

August 5, 2010

Security Myths part 2

Security Myth #4: A hardware firewall will stop the evil hackers from the internet. They also stop viruses and spam emails.

The Facts: A hardware firewall will filter your traffic based on a set of rules. If properly configured, this will certainly harden your system from certain types of attacks. However, if you want to stop intrusion attempts on your server, you probably want to implement brute force protection or intrusion detection (IDS). Most operating systems nowadays include brute force protection in one form or another (although it may not be turned on by default). If you want an IDS, there are several options available. Here at SoftLayer, we offer McAfee Host Intrusion Protection System (or HIPS for short) for Windows systems. This will offer you some additional protection against intrusion attempts, but it is no substitute for a well patched system with strong passwords. This is especially important to know if you contract with an outside agency to configure your firewall for you. It’s easy to delude yourself into a “set it and forget it” attitude toward security. I can’t tell you how many administrators I’ve talked to that have asked “how did I get hacked? I had a firewall!”

The Side Effects:

  • Having a hardware firewall means an additional step to allow access to ports. Can be time consuming.
  • Having a hardware firewall can potentially mean an additional point of failure.
  • Too many rules can mean degraded performance.

Security Myth #5: I run a Unix/Linux based system, so I can’t get hacked.

The Facts: I have seen a fair share of Unix based systems get hacked, simply because the user is unfamiliar with the OS. Running everything from within a control panel is convenient, but make sure you or one of your administrators is familiar with command line access.

The Side Effects:

  • Running a control panel can cause more security holes

Security Myth #6: I have my Wordpress (or other web application) patched to the latest version, so I should be fine.

The Facts: WordPress is a piece of cake to install. You don’t even need to know how to code in HTML. This means you can install it and have it working properly, and still forget to correct your filesystem permissions. You need to make sure that you read the installation documentation and complete all steps. If you just stop reading once the application starts working, you could potentially forget to correct your permissions and someone could gain access as an administrative user. I ran into a situation one time where a user was utilizing a web interface to manage an online marketplace. I was shocked to find out that the link he sent me allowed me in without the use of a password! Make sure that your application doesn’t use the default password or a blank password.

The Side Effects:

  • Having the latest version is great, but make sure you take a 360 degree look around to make sure nothing is out of place

Security Myth #7: I am getting SPAM messages, but I have a firewall.

The Facts: A firewall does not filter SPAM messages. You might look into the free SpamAssassin software that will filter email for potential SPAM. http://spamassassin.apache.org/

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