Posts Tagged 'Function'

September 26, 2012

Tips and Tricks - jQuery Lazy Load Plugin

In the late 90's, web pages presented their information in a relatively structured fashion, with little concern on how "pretty" the content looked. To a certain extent, that was a result of available technology and resources being a little more limited, but much of the reason was probably because we had no idea what was possible. We've come a long way, my friend. These days, it's tough to spend an hour online without coming across a gorgeous web site with huge animations, a pallet of every color possible, full-width backgrounds and high definition detail.

Those sites may be aesthetically pleasing, but they can be a big pain from a developer's perspective.

How much load does all of that stuff put on the server every time that web page is visited? As developers, it's our job to think about both what the visitor sees AND the visitor's experience in seeing it. Even the most beautiful sites will be ignored if a page takes too long to load. We spend hours optimizing every detail so users can fluidly browse without having to wait. It was in one of these optimization sessions that I discovered "lazy load."

To be honest, I wasn't too fond of the word "lazy" in the name, and I especially wasn't fond of having to explain to my boss that *I* wasn't being lazy ... The jQuery plugin is *named* "Lazy Load." Lazy Load effectively allows large pieces of content to stay in the backlog until they're needed. To give you an example of what that looks like, let's say you have a website with three humungous images, but they're all in different locations. Instead of pushing the entire load onto the user when they first land on your page, we can break them up and have them load only when the user goes to view them. We're not reducing the size of the web page; we're merely helping it work smarter.

Without Lazy Load, a normal web page loads each item when its page is visited. If a website has videos, music, images and some neat user interactivity applications, each of those items will load at the same time:

Lazy Load Illustration

If you take into consideration how large each of those items are, you can sense the problem. The user only has so much bandwidth to load these items, and something's gotta give. Usually, it means long loading times. We can't control how fast each user's ISP is, but we can reorder our items and let Lazy Load help us prioritize items and load the page more efficiently.

After we snag Lazy Load on Github (jquery.lazyload.js), we put our jQuery scripts in the <head> of our page:

<script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
<script src="jquery.lazyload.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

Now that the plugin is available to us, we need to determine what we want to load lazily. Images are probably one of the most bothersome page elements, so let's apply Lazy Load to the images we load in the belazy class. In the <head> of your page (or in the footer if you prefer your JavaScript entries there), you'll add:

<script type="text/javascript">$("img.belazy").lazyload();</script>

As a result of that function, all image tags with a class of belazy will have Lazy Load run on them. This helps us ensure that we're not loading ALL of our images lazily. Now we need to choose which images we want to apply Lazy Load to.

Let's say the image tag of the largest image on one of our page looks like this:

<img src="bighonkingimage.png"/>

To have the lazyload function apply to it, we just have to make a couple tweaks:

<img class="belazy" src="bighonkingimage.png" data-original="bighonkingimage.png"/>

We added class="belazy" to trigger the lazyload function, and we added data-original="bighonkingimage.png" to line up with the formatting required by the newest version of Lazy Load (it's simply a repeat of the source).

When a user visits our page, bighonkingimage.png will load only when it's needed!

Pretty neat, eh?

-Cassandra

September 6, 2012

Tips and Tricks - jQuery equalHeights Plugin

Last month, I posted a blog about dynamically resizing divs with jQuery, and we received a lot of positive feedback about it. My quest to avoid iframes proved to be helpful, so I thought I'd share a few more esoteric jQuery tips and tricks that may be of use to the developers and designers in the audience. As I thought back about other challenges I've faced as a coder, a great example came to mind: Making divs equal height, regardless of the amount of content inside.

I haven't seen many elegant div-based solutions for that relatively simple (and common) task, so I've noticed that many people struggle with it. Often, developers will turn back to the "Dark Side" of using tables to format the content since all columns would have the same height as the tallest column by default:

JQuery Tutorial

It was easy theme table columns and to achieve the coveted 100% height that many designers seek, but emulating that functionality with divs proves to be much more difficult. A div is like the Superman of HTML elements (faster-loading, more flexible, more dynamic, etc.), and while it has super powers, it also has its own Kryptonite-like weaknesses ... The one relevant to this blog post being that floating three div elements next to each other isn't going to give you the look of a table:

JQuery Tutorial

Each of the three divs has its own height, so if you're doing something as simple as applying background colors, you're going to wind up with an aesthetically unpleasing result: It's going to look funky.

You could get into some nifty HTML/CSS workarounds, but many frustrated theme creators and designers will tell you that if your parent elements don't have a height of a 100%, you're just wasting coding lines. Some complex solutions create the illusion of all three divs being the same height (which is arguably better than setting fixed heights), but that complexity can be difficult to scale and repeat if you need to perform similar tasks throughout your site or your application. The easiest way to get the functionality you want and the simplicity you need: The jQuery equalHeights plugin!

With a few class declarations in your existing HTML, you get the results you want, and with equalHeights, you can also specify the minimum and maximum parameters so it will create scrollable divs if the tallest element happens to be higher than your specified maximum.

How to Use jQuery equalHeights

First and foremost, include your JQuery lirbraries in the <HEAD> of your document:

<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.0/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript" src="jquery.equalheights.js"></script>

The equalHeights plugin is not a hosted library, so you have to host the file on your server (here's the link again).

With the required libraries called in our document, it's time to make the magic happen in your HTML.

Create Your Divs

<div class="divHeight">This DIV is medium sized, not too big and not too small, but just right.</div>
<div class="divHeight">This DIV has a lot of useful content and media that the user can interact with, thus it's very tall.</div>
<div class="divHeight">This DIV is tiny. Period.</div>

To have them line up next to each other, you'd have them float:left; in your CSS, and now you need to apply the equalHeights function.

Call the equalHeights Plugin
In order for the script to recognize the height of the tallest element, you'd need to call $(document).ready just before the </body> tag on your page. This will ensure that the page loads before the function runs.

The call looks like this:

<script type="text/javascript">$(document).ready(function() {
$(".divHeight").equalHeights();
});</script>

If you want to specify a minimum and maximum (i.e. The div should be at least this tall and should be no taller than [adds scrollbar if the div size exceeds] the maximum), just add the parameters:

<script type="text/javascript">$(document).ready(function() {
$(".divHeight").equalHeights(300, 600);
});</script>

The initial call does not change the appearance of the divs, but the time it takes to do the resizing is so miniscule that users will never notice. After that call is made and the height is returned, each div with the class of divHeight will inherit the the same height, and your divs will be nice and pretty:

JQuery Tutorial

This trick saved me a lot of headache and frustration, so hopefully it will do the same for you too!

-Cassandra

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