Posts Tagged 'Gaming'

January 15, 2014

Keep Spending Most Our Lives Livin' in a Gamer's Paradise

With apologies to Coolio, I couldn't resist adapting a line from the chorus of "Gangsta's Paradise" to be the title of this blog post. While I could come up with a full, cringe-worthy cloud computing version of the song (and perform it), I'll save myself the embarrassment and instead focus on why "Gamer's Paradise" came to mind in the first place. We announced some amazing stats about two gaming customers that use SoftLayer's cloud infrastructure to power popular online games, and I thought I'd share an interesting observation about that news.

More than 130 million gamers rely on SoftLayer infrastructure. SoftLayer is virtually invisible to those gamers. And that's why gaming companies love us.

When would a gamer care where a game is hosted? Simple: When gameplay is unavailable, lagging, or otherwise underperforming. Because we deliver peak cloud performance consistently for our gaming customers, we'll continue to live in the shadows of gamers' collective consciousness (while taking center stage in the minds of game producers and developers).

It's easy to get caught up in discussing the technical merits of our cloud hosting platform. Speeds and feeds provide great metrics for explaining our infrastructure, but every now and then, it's worthwhile to step back and look at the forest for the trees. Instead of talking about how bare metal resources consistently outperform their virtual server equivalents, let's take a look at why our gaming customers need as much server horsepower as we can provide:

As you can see, the games we're hosting for our customers are a little more resource-intensive than Tic-tac-toe and Pong. By leveraging SoftLayer bare metal infrastructure, gaming companies such as KUULUU and Multiplay can seamlessly support high definition gameplay in massive online environments for gamers around the world. When KUULUU launched their wildly popular LP Recharge Facebook game, they trusted our platform all the way from beta testing through launch, daily play, and updates. When Multiplay needed to support 25,000 new users in Battlefield 4, they spun up dedicated SoftLayer resources in less than four hours. If gamers expect a flawless user experience, you can imagine how attentive to infrastructure needs gaming companies are.

As more and more users sign on to play games online with Multiplay, KUULUU, and other gaming customers on our platform, we'll celebrate crossing even bigger (and more astounding) milestones like the 130 million mark we're sharing today. In the meantime, I'm going to go "check on our customers' servers" with a few hours of gameplay ... You know, for the good of our customers.

-@khazard

More Info: Multiplay and KUULUU Launch Games with SoftLayer, an IBM Company - Gaming companies flock to SoftLayer’s cloud, adding to 130 million players worldwide

Categories: 
August 19, 2013

The 5 Mortal Sins of Launching a Social Game

Social network games have revolutionized the gaming industry and created an impressive footprint on the Web as a whole. 235 million people play games on Facebook every month, and some estimates say that by 2014, more than one third of Internet population will be playing social games. Given that market, it's no wonder that the vast majority of game studios, small or big, have prioritized games to be played on Facebook, Orkut, StudiVZ, VK and other social networks.

Developing and launching a game in general is not an easy task. It takes a lot of time, a lot of people, a lot of planning and a lot of assumptions. On top of those operational challenges, the social gaming market is a jungle where "survival of the fittest" is a very, VERY visible reality: One day everyone is growing tomatoes, the next they are bad guys taking over a city, and the next they are crushing candies. An army of genius developers with the most stunning designs and super-engaging game ideas can find it difficult to navigate the fickle social waters, but in the midst of all of that uncertainty, the most successful gaming studios have all avoided five of the most common mortal sins gaming companies commit when launching a social game.

SoftLayer isn't gaming studio, and we don't have any blockbuster games of our own, but we support some of the most creative and successful gaming companies in the world, so we have a ton of indirect experience and perspective on the market. In fact, leading up to GDC Europe, I was speaking with a few of the brilliant people from KUULUU — an interactive entertainment company that creates social games for leading artists, celebrities and communities — about a new Facebook game they've been working on called LINKIN PARK RECHARGE:

After learning a more about how Kuuluu streamlines the process of developing and launching a new title, I started thinking about the market in general and the common mistakes most game developers make when they release a social game. So without further ado...

The 5 Mortal Sins of Launching a Social Game

1. Infinite Focus

Treat focus as limited resource. If it helps, look at your team's cumulative capacity to focus as though it's a single cube. To dedicate focus to different parts of the game or application, you'll need to slice the cube. The more pieces you create, the thinner the slices will be, and you'll be devoting less focus to the most important pieces (which often results in worse quality). If you're diverting a significant amount of attention from building out the game's story line to perfecting the textures of a character's hair or the grass on the ground, you'll wind up with an aesthetically beautiful game that no one wants to play. Of course that example is an extreme, but it's not uncommon for game developers to fall into a less blatant trap like spending time building and managing hosting infrastructure that could better be spent tweaking and improving in-game performance.

2. Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe – Geographic Targeting

Don't underestimate the power of the Internet and its social and viral drivers. You might believe your game will take off in Germany, but when you're publishing to a global social network, you need to be able to respond if your game becomes hugely popular in Seoul. A few enthusiastic Tweets or wall post from the alpha-players in Korea might be the catalyst that takes your user base in the region from 1000 to 80,000 overnight to 2,000,000 in a week. With that boom in demand, you need to have the flexibility to supply that new market with the best quality service ... And having your entire infrastructure in a single facility in Europe won't make for the best user experience in Asia. Keep an eye on the traction your game has in various regions and geolocate your content closer to the markets where you're seeing the most success.

3. They Love Us, so They'll Forgive Us.

Often, a game's success can lure gaming companies into a false sense of security. Think about it in terms of the point above: 2,000,000 Koreans are trying to play your game a week after a great article is published about you, but you don't make any changes to serve that unexpected audience. What happens? Players time out, latency drags the performance of your game to a crawl, and 2,000,000 users are clicking away to play one of the other 10,000 games on Facebook or 160,000 games in a mobile appstore. Gamers are fickle, and they demand high performance. If they experience anything less than a seamless experience, they're likely to spend their time and money elsewhere. Obviously, there's a unique balance for every game: A handful of players will be understanding to the fact that you underestimated the amount of incoming requests, that you need time to add extra infrastructure or move it elsewhere to decrease latency, but even those players will get impatient when they experience lag and downtime.

KUULUU took on this challenge in an innovative, automated way. They monitor the performance of all of their games and immediately ramp up infrastructure resources to accommodate growth in demand in specific areas. When demand shifts from one of their games to another, they're able to balance their infrastructure accordingly to deliver the best end-user experience at all times.

4. We Will Be Thiiiiiiiiiiis Successful.

Don't count your chickens before the eggs hatch. You never really, REALLY know how a social game will perform when the viral factor influences a game's popularity so dramatically. Your finite plans and expectations wind up being a list of guestimations and wishes. It's great to be optimistic and have faith in your game, but you should never have to over-commit resources "just in case." If your game takes two months to get the significant traction you expect, the infrastructure you built to meet those expectations will be underutilized for two months. On the other hand, if your game attracts four times as many players as you expected, you risk overburdening your resources as you scramble to build out servers. This uncertainty is one of the biggest drivers to cloud computing, and it leads us to the last mortal sin of launching a social game ...

5. Public Cloud Is the Answer to Everything.

To all those bravados who feel they are the master of cloud and see it as an answer to all their problems please, for your fans sake, remember the cloud has more than one flavor. Virtual instances in a public cloud environment can be provisioned within minutes are awesome for your webservers, but they may not perform well for your databases or processor-intensive requirements. KUULUU chose to incorporate bare metal cloud into a hybrid environment where a combination of virtual and dedicated resources work together to provide incredible results:

LP RECHARGE

Avoiding these five mortal sins doesn't guarantee success for your social game, but at the very least, you'll sidestep a few common landmines. For more information on KUULUU's success with SoftLayer, check out this case study.

-Michalina

July 9, 2013

When to Consider Riak for Your Big Data Architecture

In my Breaking Down 'Big Data' – Database Models, I briefly covered the most common database models, their strengths, and how they handle the CAP theorem — how a distributed storage system balances demands of consistency and availability while maintaining partition tolerance. Here's what I said about Dynamo-inspired databases:

What They Do: Distributed key/value stores inspired by Amazon's Dynamo paper. A key written to a dynamo ring is persisted in several nodes at once before a successful write is reported. Riak also provides a native MapReduce implementation.
Horizontal Scaling: Dynamo-inspired databases usually provide for the best scale and extremely strong data durability.
CAP Balance: Prefer availability over consistency
When to Use: When the system must always be available for writes and effectively cannot lose data.
Example Products: Cassandra, Riak, BigCouch

This type of key/value store architecture is very unique from the document-oriented MongoDB solutions we launched at the end of last year, so we worked with Basho to prioritize development of high-performance Riak solutions on our global platform. Since you already know about MongoDB, let's take a few minutes to meet the new kid on the block.

Riak is a distributed database architected for availability, fault tolerance, operational simplicity and scalability. Riak is masterless, so each node in a Riak cluster is the same and contains a complete, independent copy of the Riak package. This design makes the Riak environment highly fault tolerant and scalable, and it also aids in replication — if a node goes down, you can still read, write and update data.

As you approach the daunting prospect of choosing a big data architecture, there are a few simple questions you need to answer:

  1. How much data do/will I have?
  2. In what format am I storing my data?
  3. How important is my data?

Riak may be the choice for you if [1] you're working with more than three terabytes of data, [2] your data is stored in multiple data formats, and [3] your data must always be available. What does that kind of need look like in real life, though? Luckily, we've had a number of customers kick Riak's tires on SoftLayer bare metal servers, so I can share a few of the use cases we've seen that have benefited significantly from Riak's unique architecture.

Use Case 1 – Digital Media
An advertising company that serves over 10 billion ads per month must be able to quickly deliver its content to millions of end users around the world. Meeting that demand with relational databases would require a complex configuration of expensive, vertically scaled hardware, but it can be scaled out horizontally much easier with Riak. In a matter of only a few hours, the company is up and running with an ad-serving infrastructure that includes a back-end Riak cluster in Dallas with a replication cluster in Singapore along with an application tier on the front end with Web servers, load balancers and CDN.

Use Case 2 – E-commerce
An e-commerce company needs 100-percent availability. If any part of a customer's experience fails, whether it be on the website or in the shopping cart, sales are lost. Riak's fault tolerance is a big draw for this kind of use case: Even if one node or component fails, the company's data is still accessible, and the customer's user experience is uninterrupted. The shopping cart structure is critical, and Riak is built to be available ... It's a perfect match.

As an additional safeguard, the company can take advantage of simple multi-datacenter replication in their Riak Enterprise environment to geographically disperse content closer to its customers (while also serving as an important tool for disaster recovery and backup).

Use Case 3 – Gaming
With customers like Broken Bulb and Peak Games, SoftLayer is no stranger to the gaming industry, so it should come as no surprise that we've seen interesting use cases for Riak from some of our gaming customers. When a game developer incorporated Riak into a new game to store player data like user profiles, statistics and rankings, the performance of the bare metal infrastructure blew him away. As a result, the game's infrastructure was redesigned to also pull gaming content like images, videos and sounds from the Riak database cluster. Since the environment is so easy to scale horizontally, the process on the infrastructure side took no time at all, and the multimedia content in the game is getting served as quickly as the player data.

Databases are common bottlenecks for many applications, but they don't have to be. Making the transition from scaling vertically (upgrading hardware, adding RAM, etc.) to scaling horizontally (spreading the work intelligently across multiple nodes) alleviates many of the pain points for a quickly growing database environment. Have you made that transition? If not, what's holding you back? Have you considered implementing Riak?

-@marcalanjones

March 14, 2012

Game On: SoftLayer + Game Developers + GDC

Last week, I spent a few days at GDC in San Francisco, getting a glimpse into the latest games hitting the market. Game developers are a unique bunch, and that uniqueness goes beyond the unbelievable volume of NOS Energy Drinks they consume ... They like to test and push the IT envelope, making games more diverse, interactive and social.

The new crop of games showcased at GDC is more resource-intensive — it's almost like watching an IT arms race; they're upping the ante for all online gaming companies. The appetite from the public remains relentless, and the pay-off can be huge. Consider that gaming industry research firm DFC Intelligence predicts that worldwide market revenue generated solely from online games is set to reach $26.4 billion in 2015, more than double the $11.9 achieved in 2009.

That's where SoftLayer comes in. We understand the high stakes in the gaming world and have tailored our IaaS offerings for an optimal end-user experience that stretches from initial release to everyday play. Take a look at what game developer OMGPOP (a SoftLayer customer) achieved with Draw Something: Almost overnight it became the #1 application in Apple's App Store, tallying more than 26 million downloads in just a few weeks. To put the volume of gameplay into perspective, the game itself is generating more than 30 hours of drawings per second. That's what what we refer to as "Internet Scale." When YouTube hit one hour of video uploads per second, they came up with a pretty impressive presentation to talk about that scale ... and that's only one hour per second.

Draw Something

Gamers require a high-performance, always on, graphically attractive and quick-responding experience. If they don't get that experience, they move on to the next game that can give it to them. With our core strengths of automation and extensive network reach, game developers come to us to easily enable that experience, and in return, they get a platform where they can develop, test, deploy and yes, play their latest games. True "Internet Scale" with easy consumptive billing ... Get in and out quickly, and use only what you need.

Some of the most interesting and innovative use cases of how customers take advantage of our platform come from the gaming industry. Because we make it easy to rapidly provision resources (deploy dedicated servers in less than two hours and cloud servers in as few as five minutes) in an automated way (our API), many developers have started incorporating cloud-like functions into their games and applications that add dedicated resources to their infrastructure on-demand as you'd only expect to see in a virtual environment. Now that Flex Images are available, we're expecting to see a lot more of that.

As I was speaking with a few customers on the show floor, I was amazed to hear how passionate they were about what one called the "secret ingredient" at SoftLayer: Our network. He talked about his trials and tribulations in delivering global reach and performance before he transitioned his infrastructure to SoftLayer, and hearing what our high-bandwidth and low-latency architecture has meant for his games was an affirmation for all of the work we've put into creating (and continuing to build) the network.

The rapid pace of innovation and change that keeps the gaming industry going is almost electric ... When you walk into a room filled with game developers, their energy is contagious. We ended GDC with an opportunity to do just that. We were proud to sponsor a launch party for our friends at East Side Game Studios as the celebrated the release of two new games — Zombinis and Ruby Skies. Since their NomNom Combo puzzle game is one of the most addicting games on my iPhone, it was a no-brainer to hook up with them at GDC. If you want a peek into the party, check out our GDC photo album on Facebook.

Draw Something

To give you an idea of how much the gaming culture permeates the SoftLayer offices, I need only point out a graffiti mural on one of the walls in our HQ office in Dallas. Because we sometimes get nostalgic for the days of misspent youth in video arcades playing Pac Man, Donkey Kong and Super Mario, we incorporated those iconic games in a piece of artwork in our office:

Retro Gaming Mural

If you are an aspiring game developer, we'd like to hear from you and help enable the next Internet gaming sensation ... Having a good amount of experience with our existing customer base should assure you that we know what we're talking about. For now, though, it's my turn to go "Draw Something."

-@gkdog

October 22, 2011

Content Streaming = Living Like Kings

As a video gaming and movie addict, I've always followed the latest trends and news in these two areas. Because there always seems to be some "breaking news" every day due to technology advancing so rapidly, sometimes it's tough to keep up.

In gaming, I remember it all started for me back when my parents decided to buy me the first Nintendo console. Pointing that light sensor gun at unsuspecting ducks and watching them fall was all the rage ... It marked a big step in the evolution of home gaming. What initially seemed like a good investment to keep me out of trouble soon turned into a headache for my parents. I frequently begged for more games, and they were not cheap. Look at how much new video games cost these days, and you'll see that not much has changed in that regard. The fire to play all the latest games was never extinguished, so a chunk of my income was always earmarked for the next amazing game I needed.

As for movies, I also found myself collecting as many as possible to rewatch whenever I choose. While each individual movie didn't cost as much as a video game, the aggregate costs definitely built up over time. My family and friends warned me that my "extravagant lifestyle" is reserved for the rich and would only lead me to financial ruin.

Fast forward to today, and I can say that I've learned a lot and found ways to sustainably feed my addiction without driving myself to financial ruin. How is it possible that I am able to live like a king without breaking the bank? It's all thanks to content streaming, made possible by the Internet. I no longer have to buy every single game to have the ability to play whenever I feel like it with services like OnLive that actually streams numerous games to my TV (and a few other supported devices). Beyond the fact that I save money by not buying the game, I don't even need the latest computer hardware to play the more graphics-intensive games like Crysis:

Crysis

You might not be familiar with OnLive just yet, but most people know about content steaming from companies like Netflix and Amazon. You can stream countless movies to your devices to watch movies on demand for a monthly fee or on a per-movie basis. With these services readily available, it's possible for just about anyone have the "kid in the candy store" experience of pulling up essentially any content whenever we want to watch or play.

If either form of entertainment appeals to you, you can agree that our quality of life has improved over time significantly. The streaming services provided by companies like Netflix and OnLive have really taken advantage of the technological capabilities offered by high speed Internet, which also reminds us of the significance of web hosting. To offer customers complete satisfaction, deciding which web hosting company to go with for a business is often a very difficult decision, especially since there are so many out there. It would make complete business sense to find an extremely reliable company to ensure the success of such services and having worked in the industry, and I can assure you with much pride that SoftLayer certainly shines in this area.

As an employee, I see how we're building our network to provide the best experience around the world, and if there's ever a problem, we treat all outages with extreme urgency. Customers get better turnaround times, and they can provide better service for their customers. If some content streaming were to become unavailable, it wouldn't be long before it became available again.

It's pretty safe to say that the Internet has spoiled me ... Now all I need is a crown.

-Danny

Categories: 
October 11, 2011

Building a True Real-Time Multiplayer Gaming Platform

Some of the most innovative developments on the Internet are coming from online game developers looking to push the boundaries of realism and interactivity. Developing an online gaming platform that can support a wide range of applications, including private chat, avatar chats, turn-based multiplayer games, first-person shooters, and MMORPGs, is no small feat.

Our high speed, global network significantly minimizes reliability, access, latency, lag and bandwidth issues that commonly challenge online gaming. Once users begin to experience issues of latency, reliability, they are gone and likely never to return. Our cloud, dedicated, and managed hosting solutions enable game developers to rapidly test, deploy and manage rich interactive media on a secure platform.

Consider the success of one of our partners — Electrotank Inc. They’ve been able to support as many as 6,500 concurrent users on just ONE server in a realistic simulation of a first-person shooter game, and up to 330,000 concurrent users for a turn-based multiplayer game. Talk about server density.

This is just scratching the surface because we're continuing to build our global footprint to reduce latency for users around the world. This means no awkward pauses, jumping around, but rather a smooth, seamless, interactive online gaming experience. The combined efforts of SoftLayer’s infrastructure and Electrotank’s performant software have produced a high-performance networking platform that delivers a highly scalable, low latency user experience to both gamers and game developers.

Electrotank

You can read more about how Electrotank is leveraging SoftLayer’s unique network platform in today's press release or in the fantastic white paper they published with details about their load testing methodology and results.

We always like to hear our customers opinions so let us know what you think.

-@nday91

September 28, 2009

Game Time

It’s Sunday morning and I’m leaving the NOC to make my morning rounds of the Washington, D.C. datacenter. Grumpy and tired I walk through the double doors into the fluorescent glare of the server room. In 30 paces the colorful eth bundles of our servers come into view and then I realize. I love the sound of server fans in the morning.

The past year and a half at SoftLayer’s newest datacenter have been incredibly stressful and rewarding. Those who endured have gained my respect. Personal differences have subsided and camaraderie has formed. Of course anyone would wonder how many tech nuts does it take to make a clan? And from the glue of hardship was born Team Orange DOW2.

You might wonder why people who work together so much (sometimes for 12+ hr shifts) want to spend more time with each other. I mean, haven’t you had enough already? The answer is that we already have so much in common and finding a few extra hours to hang out together online is a joy we can’t get enough of. Of course, the entertainment value of an innovative RTS like DOW2 is multiplied immensely when played with friends. Of the other SoftLayer members of Team Orange DOW2 I am the newest to multiplayer gaming and am impressed by how much tech goes into it. Numerous options for in-game chatting (Team Orange uses Mumble, which has the least lag and cleanest interface), hi-powered video cards (1.5GB onboard ram!), dual core procs running on Win7 RC, live-streamed replays with on-demand libraries, and much more.

Everyone has heard the theory that gaming has pushed the boundaries of computing, but I believe it is more likely that datacenters like SoftLayer have pushed the boundaries of networking and helped make advanced tech more affordable to the ravenous mass of online gamers. The number of mega-powered game servers hosted by SoftLayer is a testament to the unholy integration of gaming and networking, and to that all of us closet gamers must say, “moar please!”[sic]

August 18, 2008

Not Sure I Have Enough Yet

You ever wonder what a SoftLayer technician does in their down time? Well aside from my addictions to coffee, PHP and of course the dreaded World of Warcraft, I tinker. My home network has been a work in progress for about 5 years on and off. For a family of 4 with 2 very young children, we have an awful lot of computers. At last count we currently have 10 computers when you include the laptops. As the wee ones are not to an age where computers even cross their minds, that means between myself and my wife we use all 10, well I should say I use about 8 of them and she uses 2.

You might wonder what a person does with 10 computers and how in the world you handle that in a home environment. Well here is a basic run through our world o computers. My wife being the average joe, has a desktop and a laptop. I on the other hand cannot get by with just 1 desktop, nope I need 3. If my desk didn’t give off a healthy hum and a slight vibration I just wouldn’t be happy. So my desktops are broken down in to a Windows Vista box, generally used for gamming and 2 Linux boxes running Slackware and Gentoo respectively. You might wonder why I need 3, and my response would probably be something like “Because I can”. I do however make full use of these different desktops on a fairly regular basis so I guess I can still justify them. Of course you really could consider my laptop to be yet another desktop, but then again, it is rarely used at home.

So as you have probably noticed, that’s only 6 of the 10. Now, 2 of the computers I have are media centers connected to the TV’s in the living room and the master bedroom. If you haven’t had a media center, you just don’t know what you’re missing. This brings us to the last 2 pieces of this network. The last 2 are rather old boxes that sit in the corner of a closet being as unobtrusive as possible; however they are the backbone of my home network, the fileservers. What good would 2 media centers be if I needed to have a duplicate of all files on each one of them? In the world of computers, the 2 fileservers would be considered dinosaurs, but for what they do, they are perfect.

Now that you have all these computers, they need to be connected somehow. This entire network is connecting to 2 separate gigabit networks. Why 2 you might add? Well I took a page from the SoftLayer book on that one. I saw no reason why the fileservers or the media centers needed internet access, so rather than deal with firewalls and the like, it was easier to put in a second network linking all the computers to each other while only the desktop computers were able to connect to the internet.

Is all of this overkill? Probably, but it sure gives me something to do. Now my current project might actually cut down that number a bit, then again, what fun is that? The current project is to get a 2008 server running with Hyper-V and a domain controller up and running. I figure since I have all these computers, I should be able to log into them all without having to create a separate user account on each. This project has been an experience for sure, but that’s for another blog.

-Mathew

February 28, 2008

Companion Cube

For the gaming/programmer community, Portal is THE GAME. Seemingly from nowhere, this game burst upon the scene and took the nerd world by storm. Excellent storyline, snappy dialog, challenging puzzles, and an awesome space-warping gun combine to create an incredibly memorable game.

Nearly overnight, the hacker lexicon got some new words and phrases. This guide will help you make sense of most hacker conversations you may hear that refer to Portal.

The Cake is a Lie

The artificially intelligent computer that runs the series of puzzles (known as the Aperture Science Computer Aided Enrichment Center) goads your character along by stating that "cake" will be served to you if you survive all the tests. However, graffiti on the walls of the center proclaim otherwise... stating that the cake being promised is a great, big lie.

Hackers generally use this phrase either as an icebreaker or as a description of a situation where somebody is motivated to do a difficult task for a promised but unverified reward.

I'm making a note here: Huge Success!

At the end of the game, the computer gives you your final review. At the beginning of the review, it says "This was a triumph. I'm making a note here: Huge Success!"

Like Trekkies shouting "Qua'pla!" (Klingon for "Success!"), programmers are now known to say that they are "making a note here: Huge Success!"

The Companion Cube

The Companion Cube is an inert storage cube imbued with a personality by the game programmers to trick game players into carrying this cube throughout a puzzle, but then requiring them to destroy it at the end. They did such a good job, however, that game players have become attached to this "Companion Cube," going so far as to build little paper models or buy plushies of this "character." Generally, you'll hear a hacker talk about how they would never let go of their companion cube, or something along those lines.

Aperture Science Thing We Don't Know What It Does

Programmers find long multi-word names for products to be humorous. The game developers played on this concept:

  • It's not the lab. It's the Aperture Science Computer Aided Enrichment Center.
  • It's not a storage box. It's an Aperture Science Weighted Storage Cube.
  • It's not a button. It's an Aperture Science 1500 Megawatt Superconducing Super Button.

The joke is to take, say, a mouse, and turn it into an "Aperture Science Rotational Axis 2 Dimensional Vector Detecting Peripheral".

Now You're Thinking in Portals

With this guide handy, you can start to understand the conversations of your Portal crazed coworkers. You will no longer be confused when a coworker bursts out laughing when holding a slice of cake. You won't wonder why he has a background with little hearts all over it, displaying a strange box. You can now safely laugh at any name longer than 4 words, knowing that it's most likely a joke. This won't help with any of the other strange things developers say, but at least their conversations should be a little more transparent now.

For more information, check Wikipedia, or better yet, Watch the trailer and play the game.

-Zoey

January 28, 2008

Virtualizing Our Childhoods - There's Money to be Made

Here's a couple of my childhood memories for you. Today, they've been virtualized. And monetized.

Shooting Up the Neighborhood
The kids in my neighborhood would get home from school, crank out the homework and household chores, then bail outdoors in all kinds of weather and play some version of battle games, be it "cops and robbers", "cowboys and Indians", "World War II", etc. In addition to politically incorrect game names, we'd use toy guns and plastic knives and swords to pretend-shoot each other and pretend-hack each other to bits -- all in good fun and while using vocabulary that our parents didn't care for. I'm sure the toy makers made a modest profit from our recreation.

Just last night, my son (age 14) approached me and announced that his homework was done, his room was straight, he was ready for his tests, etc., then asked if he could get on his Xbox 360. After I had him help with the dinner dishes, he headed upstairs much like I would head out the front door when I was 14. I went upstairs a little later and he was logged on to Xbox Live with the voice headset running and he pointed out that about 11 of his hockey teammates were also online and playing Call of Duty 4. So instead of pretend-shooting each other outside in the cold January air, they all get together online and do it. Don’t ask him what kind of language gets used either – it’s probably the same as my generation. From what I understand, the toy makers in this case make a lot more money than those of my youth.

Passing Notes at School
In yet another politically incorrect part of my upbringing, somewhere around 5th and 6th grade, somebody thought it would be a good idea to pass ballots around the classroom. They’d write a question at the top of the page along the lines of “Do you like Gary?” and they’d put two columns below. Other kids would sign under the “yes” or “no” columns depending on how they felt that day.

This is basically virtualized with Facebook, Linked In, and Plaxo. We get prompted to accept others as friends and recommend each other with these networking tools. With all the applications, pictures, messaging and so on these go way beyond our childhood note-passing but the concept is the same. Virtualizing this concept has unlocked untold riches. How much? Microsoft’s investment in Facebook extrapolates the value of Facebook to be $15 billion. That’s a nice chunk of change for virtualizing the passing of notes at school.

All This Virtualization Requires Servers – We’ve Got ‘Em
As I’ve mentioned before, I’m not real good at whiteboarding new ideas. Tell you what – you think of something from childhood that can be virtualized into billions in valuation, and SoftLayer will provide the servers and connectivity you need to achieve it.

-Gary

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