Posts Tagged 'Hackathon'

November 19, 2015

SoftLayer and Koding join forces to power a Global Virtual Hackathon

This guest blog post is written by Cole Fox, director of partnerships at Koding.

Koding is excited to partner with SoftLayer on its upcoming Global Virtual Hackathon, happening December 12–13, 2015. The event builds on last year’s Hackathon, where more than 60,000 developers participated from all over the world. The winners took home over $35,000 in prizes! This year, we’ve upped the ante to make the event even larger than the last time: the winner will take home a $100,000 grand prize.

“We are working with Koding for this virtual hackathon as part of our commitment to promote open source technology and support the talented community of developers who are dispersed all over the globe,” said Sandy Carter, general manager of Cloud Ecosystem and Developers at IBM. “Cloud-based open source development platforms like Koding make it easier to get software projects started, and hackathons are a great place to show how these kinds of platforms make software development easier and more fun.”

Why a virtual hackathon?
Hackathons are awesome. They allow developers to solve problems in a very short amount of time. The challenge with traditional hackathons is that they require you to be physically present in a room. With more and more of our lives moving online, why be tied to a physical location to solve problems? Virtual hackathons allow talented individuals from all over the world to participate, collaborate, and showcase their skills, regardless of their physical location. Our Global Virtual Hackathon levels the playing field.

Who won last year?
Educational games, especially those that teach programming, were popular to build—and a few actually won! Want to see what the winners built? Click here to check out a fun yet effective game teaching students to program. Learn more about the team of developers and see their code here. Last year, nine winners across three categories took home a prize. To see a list of last year’s winners, see the blog post here.

Tips to be successful and win this year
Here’s some motivation for you: the grand prize is $100,000. (That’s seed capital for your startup idea!)

So how do you win? First and foremost, apply now! Then talk to some friends and maybe even team up. You can also use Koding to find teammates once you’re accepted. Teammates aren’t a requirement but can definitely make for a fun experience and improve your chances of making something amazing.

Once you’re in, get excited! And be sure to start thinking about what you want to build around this year’s themes.

And the 2015 themes are…
Ready to build something and take home $100,000? Here are this year’s themes:

  • Data Visualization
    Data is everywhere, but how can we make sense of it? Infographics and analytics can bring important information to light that wasn’t previously accessible when stuck in a spreadsheet or database. We challenge you to use some of the tools out there to help articulate some insights.
  • Enterprise Productivity
    The workplace can always be improved and companies are willing to pay a lot of money for great solutions. Build an application that helps employees do their jobs better and you could win big.
  • Educational Games
    Last year’s winning team, WunderBruders, created an educational game. But games aren’t just for children. Studies have shown that games not only improve motor skills, but they are also a great way to learn something new.

Wait a second. What is Koding anyway?
In short, Koding is a developer environment as a service. The Koding platform provides you with what you need to move your software development to the cloud. Koding’s cloud-based software development service provides businesses with the ability to formulate the most productive, collaborative, and efficient development workflows. Businesses, both small and large, face three common challenges: on-boarding new team members, workflow efficiency, and knowledge retention. These pain points impact companies across all industries, but for companies involved in software development, these are often the most expensive and critical problems that continue to remain unresolved. Koding was built to tackle these inefficiencies head on. Learn more about Koding for Teams.

Can I use my SoftLayer virtual servers with Koding?
Koding’s technical architecture is very flexible. If you have a SoftLayer virtual server, you can easily connect it to your Koding account. The feature is described in detail here.

Think you can hack it? APPLY NOW!

-Cole Fox

March 27, 2015

Building “A Thing” at’s Hardware Weekend

Introduction to

Over the weekend in San Francisco, I attended a very cool hackathon put together by the good folks at’s Hardware Weekend is a series of hackathons all over the country designed to bring together people with a passion for building things, give them access to industry mentors, and see what fun and exciting things they come up with in two days. The registration desk was filled with all kinds of hardware modules to be used for whatever project you could dream up—from Intel Edison boards, the Grove Starter Kit, a few other things that I have no idea what they did, and of course, plenty of stickers.

After a delicious breakfast, we heard a variety of potential product pitches by the attendees, then everyone split off into groups to support their favorite ideas and turn them into a reality.

When not hard at work coding, soldering, or wiring up devices, the attendees heard talks from a variety of industry leaders, who shared their struggles and what worked for their products. The founder of gave a great talk on how his company began and where it is today.

Building a thing!
After lunch, Phil Jackson, SoftLayer’s lead technology evangelist, gave an eloquent crash course in SoftLayer and how to get your new thing onto the Internet of Things. Phil and I have a long history in Web development, so we provided answers to many questions on that subject. But when it comes to hardware, we are fairly green. So when we weren't helping teams get into the cloud, we tried our hand at building something ourselves.

We started off with some of the hardware handouts: an Edison board and the Grove Starter Kit. We wanted to complete a project that worked in the same time the rest of the teams had—and showed off some of the power of SoftLayer, too. Our idea was to use the Grove Kit’s heat sensor, display it on the LCD, and post the result to a IBM Cloudant database, which would then be displayed on a SoftLayer server as a live updating graph.

The first day consisted mostly of Googling variations on “Edison getting started,” “read Grove heat sensor,” “write to LCD”, etc. We started off simply, by trying to make an LED blink, which was pretty easy. Making the LED STOP blinking, however, was a bit more challenging. But we eventually figured out how to stop a program from running. We had a lot of trouble getting our project to work in Python, so we eventually admitted defeat and switched to writing node.js code, which was significantly easier (mostly because everything we needed was on stackoverflow).

After we got the general idea of how these little boards worked, our project came together very quickly at the end of Day 2—and not a moment too soon. The second I shouted, “IT WORKS!” it was time for presentations—and for us to give out the lot of Raspberry Pi we brought to some lucky winners.

And, without further ado, we present to you … the winners!


This team wanted to mod out the Hackster’s DeLorean time machine to prevent Biff (or anyone else) from taking it out for a spin. They used a variety of sensors to monitor the DeLorean for any unusual or unauthorized activity, and if all else failed, were prepared to administer a deadly voltage through the steering wheel (represented by harmless LEDs in the demo) to stop the interloper from stealing their time machine. The team has a wonderful write up of the sensors they used, along with the products used to bring everything together.

This was a very energetic team who we hope will use their new Raspberry Pis to keep the space-time continuum clear.


The KegTime project aimed to make us all more responsible drinkers by using an RFID reader to measure alcohol consumption and call Uber for you when you have had enough. They used a SoftLayer server to host all the drinking data, and used it to interact with Uber’s API to call a ride at the appropriate moment. Their demo included a working (and filled) keg with a pretty fancy LED-laden tap, which was very impressive. In recognition of their efforts to make us all more responsible drinkers, we awarded them five Raspberry Pis so they can continue to build cool projects to make the world a better place.

The Future of
Although this is the end of the event in San Francisco, there are many more events coming up in the near future. I will be going to Phoenix next on March 28 and look forward to all the new projects inventors come up with.

Be happy and keep hacking!


February 20, 2013

Global Game Jam: Build a Video Game in 48 Hours

You're a conflicted zombie that yearns to be human again. Now you've got to dodge grandma and babies in an 8-bit side-scroller. Now you're Vimberly Koll, and you have to stop Poseidon from raining down on the Global Game Jam. At the end of Global Game Jam Vancouver, teams of developers, 3D artists, level designers and sound engineers conceptualized and created these games (along with a number of others) in less than 48 hours. Building a game in a weekend is no small task, so only the best and brightest game developers in the world converge on over 300 sites in 63 countries to show off their skills.

For the fifth annual Global Game Jam, more than 16,000 participants committed a weekend to learning from and collaborating with their peers in a worldwide game development hackathon. I was lucky enough to get to sit in on the action in Vancouver, and I thought I'd give you a glimpse into how participants make game development magic happen in such a short period of time.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 1 (Friday Night): The Brainstorm
More than 260 participants poured into an open study area of the Life Sciences building at the Univerity of British Columbia to build the next best distraction ... er, video game. The event kicked off with a keynote from Brian Proviciano, a game development prodigy, who shared his history and offered sage advice for those interested in the industry. Following a comical 20-second idea pitch session, the caffeine began to flow and the brainstorm commenced.

Inspiration could come from anywhere, and a perfect example is the "Poseidon" game I mentioned above: GGJVancouver organizer Kimberly Voll had sprinklers rain on her office a few days prior to the event, so someone decided to make a game out of that situation. This year, the Global Game Jam introduced an interesting twist that they called "diversifiers." Diversifiers are side-challenges for extra credit, and two of my favorites were "Atari Age" — the game has to be smaller than 4kb — and "May the (Web) Force be With You" — the game has to run in a browser.

Fast-forward two hours, and as you look around, you see storyboards and scripts being written, characters being born, and a few intrepid developers starting to experiment with APIs, game engines , and external controllers to find some additional flair for their final products. You wouldn't expect a game made in 48 hours to incorporate an iOS Eye Tracking API or the Leap Motion gesture controller, but these developers are ambitious!

As the concepts are finalized, team members rotate in and out for sleep, and some even go home to get some rest — a good idea on the first night since everyone usually pulls an all-nighter on Saturday.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 2 (Saturday): Laying the Foundation
It was cool to walk the aisles and peer over peoples' shoulders as musical scores, wrangled code and character models were coming together. However, the scene wasn't all smiles and hugs; a few groups were wrestling quirky bugs and integration issues, and in some cases, they ended up having to completely reboot their approach. Day 2 set the course for all of the teams. A few teams disbanded due to disagreements or unfixable bugs, and some developers peeled off from their teams to follow an untamed passion. In the Global Game Jam, there are no rules ... only games.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 3 (Sunday): Sleep, What's That?
By Day 3, the building starts feeling like a college dorm during finals week when everyone is staying up all night to study or finish their comp-sci assignments (I know it wasn't just me...). Running on various vehicles of caffeine, teams worked heads-down all day to meet their 3pm deadline. Sighs of relief and high fives were exchanged when the games were submitted, and the event concluded with a pizza party and demo session where everyone could see and share the fruits of their labor.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

As I left the conference, teams were given the opportunity to showcase their games on the big screen to a chorus of laughter and applause. It was an awesome experience, and I'm glad SoftLayer sponsored it so that I could attend, take it all in and meet a ton of outstanding up-and-coming game developers. If you're into making games (or you've thought about it), check out the Global Game Jam one of these years.

Just don't forget to bring deodorant ... for your neighbor's sake.


Photo Credit Shout-Outs: Alex Larente, Ligia Brosch, Naz Madani. Great shots!

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