Posts Tagged 'India'

January 15, 2016

Vuukle: Helping Publishers Manage Comments and Match Readers with Content

I recently had a conversation with Ravi Mittal, the founder of a company called Vuukle. Vuukle is based in New Delhi and has just graduated from our Catalyst startup program.

Vuukle actually started out in Silicon Valley—Ravi launched his first product iteration with the goal of trying to source public opinion on the Web. Key to his initial offering was a proprietary algorithm he developed to sort comments in order of credibility—a highly valuable aspect of the product, but something he quickly learnt wasn’t enough value to encompass a product.

Through experiments with Vuukle’s early customers (including the Santa Clara Weekly), a major problem emerged which appeared to pervade the online publishing industry: reader engagement wasn’t sticky enough to compel them to post (and reply to) comments. In order to solve this meta-problem, Vuukle pivoted into a new type of comment publishing system, which helps publishers see engagement through custom analytics.

The major problem Vuukle faces is not unique to just the publishers they service. It’s a pretty large scale global problem, extending beyond news publishers and into all content-based publishing online—so you can imagine how much competition is out there around the globe in this space. When I asked Ravi how he differentiates Vuukle from recently dominant players like Livefyre and Disqus, he offered, "Most customers aren’t using those other services; they have their own commenting systems. If anything, we were pitted against Facebook commenting. In the few cases where Disqus is being used, we’ve seen problems with load times, throttling limits and so on."

In order to set Vuukle in a class of its own, Ravi and his team—which is globally dispersed, with people in Egypt, the Ukraine, U.S.A., and India—have architected an infrastructure for super-fast load times that work at amazing scale, employing SoftLayer servers in our Singapore and India data centers, as well as working with a third party, ScaleDB, to handle database queries and traffic. Of course, that alone doesn’t give them a unique value proposition; Vuukle truly sets itself apart by dropping publisher costs upfront to a minimal platform access fee and offering a 50/50 revenue share model. Vuukle not only is set up to handle high traffic websites with commenting, but it also promotes user engagement with comments by integrating with actual publishing systems. Vuukle passes traffic between posts and offers editors insights into how readers are commenting, in addition to creating a new revenue stream through comments—from which it sources the majority of its own income.

Interestingly, Ravi’s move from the Valley to India came because of family reasons and ended up being a blessing to the business. Early after his move, he realized that there was a ton of opportunity for Vuukle with the major Indian newspapers that had cobbled together their own infrastructure to power websites. Just a couple years in, Vuukle is powering comments on The Hindu, Deccan Chronicle, and Indian Express, three of the most highly trafficked news websites in the country. To help global adoption amongst all sorts of publishers, Vuukle also offers a free WordPress plugin.

Vuukle seems to have gained traction through Ravi’s hard work chasing customers at home, and he’s proud to be finding success despite being bootstrapped. When questioned about the local startup scene, Ravi said, “Nothing much is unique in the Indian startup ecosystem. [It's] kind of like a gold rush in India, where founders are hunting for investment before they have a clear market path and products that are market-ready. A lot of copycat businesses [are] launching that are focused on Indian markets (taking models from the States and elsewhere.) Not many patents are being filed in India—not much actual innovation, indicative of a proliferation of large seed round raises (around $1 million) and a lot of startups spend funding on staff they don’t need.”

The future seems bright for Vuukle. Its growth beyond India’s borders will happen soon and will be financed through revenue rather than venture capital rounds, of which Ravi seems quite wary. Now that Vuukle has graduated from Catalyst, I was keen to hear whether the company would still keep the majority of their infrastructure with IBM—it turns out prospective Vuukle customers love hearing that their infrastructure is hosted on our cloud and that a core aspect of Vuukle’s value proposition is the scale and reliability we offer their solution.

I really think this company is an exciting one to watch. I look forward to seeing greater success for Vuukle as they grow with our ever-expanding footprint of data centers in the Asian region and globally.

-Qasim

Based in Toronto, Qasim Virjee manages the Catalyst Startup Program in Canada and can be reached on twitter (@qasim) or via his personal website.

October 19, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 17

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

We’re in India.
We’ve finally arrived! Our first Indian data center is now open in Chennai. The new data center will allow us to grow our cloud footprint with a direct connection between Europe and Asia through India. It will also offer “local customers and end users increased performance and speed for data traveling to and from the region.

Along with the data center, IBM announced a new partnership with the National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM) to launch techstartup.in. Robert LeBlanc, senior vice president of IBM Cloud said, “With the opening of the IBM Cloud data center in Chennai and our collaboration with NASSCOM, IBM is not only delivering greater access to a globally integrated cloud data center that offers the performance and speed needed, but it is also creating the foundation for future growth by working with NASSCOM 10,000 Startups program to equip local developers with the skills they need to grow the market.”

What’s up with Watson?
Watson Analytics now offers even more resources to users. IBM announced the introduction of new data discovery and Q&A capabilities that will allow users to more easily gather knowledge from their data.

IBM also introduced its newest tool, Expert Storybooks. Expert Storybooks will guide users in understanding, learning, and reasoning with different types of data sources to uncover the most relevant facts and reveal patterns and relationships for predictive decision making. Find more information about the types of Storybooks here.

You’re only a couple of clicks away from hybrid cloud.
Our public cloud is being integrated with VMware’s virtualization stack. This will allow current VMware customers to build hybrid clouds with just a few clicks. Geoff Waters, vice president of Service Provider Channel at VMware, said, “This partnership provides enterprises with a proven cloud platform on a global basis with high performance, enhanced security and control by using technologies from SoftLayer and VMware. The ability to move workloads across continents offers enterprises new and exciting deployment options for their applications and cloud services.” Get more information about the partnership here.

-Rachel

Categories: 
April 1, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1 No. 8

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Sunny Skies for IBM Cloud and The Weather Company
IBM made big headlines on Tuesday when it announced they would team up with The Weather Company boasting “100 percent chance of smarter business forecasts.”

Bloomberg sits down with Bob Picciano, IBM Analytics Senior VP, and David Kenny, The Weather Company CEO to discuss what makes this different than other companies that have analyzed the weather in the past. Using Watson Analytics and the Internet of Things, the partnership will transform business decision-making based on weather behavior. Read how IBM’s $3 billion investment in the Internet of Things will collect weather data from 100,000 weather stations around the world and turn it into meaningful data for business owners.

Indian Startups Choose SoftLayer
According to the National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), India has the world’s third largest and the fastest-growing startup ecosystem. Like many SoftLayer startup customers, Goldstar Healthcare, Vtiger, Clematix, Ecoziee Marketing utilize the SoftLayer cloud infrastructure platform to “begin on a small scale and then expand rapidly to meet workload demands without having to worry about large investments in infrastructure development.”

New SoftLayer Storage Offerings
Last week, SoftLayer announced the launch of block storage and file storage complete with Endurance- and Performance-class tiers. The media was fast to report the new offerings that provide customers more choice, flexibility, and control for their storage needs and workloads.

“ … SoftLayer’s focus on tailored capacity and performance needs coincides with the trend in the cloud market of customizing technology based on different application requirements.”– IBM Splits SoftLayer Cloud Storage Into Endurance, Performance Tiers

“In the age of the cloud, the relationship between cloud storage capacity and I/O performance has officially become divorced.” – IBM Falls Into Cloud Storage Pricing Line

Pick your favorite online tech media and read all about it: SiliconANGLE, Computer Weekly, Data Center Knowledge, CRN, V3, Cloud Computing Intelligence, Storage Networking Solutions UK, and DCS Europe.

#IBMandTwitter
There are more than half a billion tweets posted to Twitter every day. IBM is teaming up with Twitter to turn those “tweets into insights for more than 100 organizations around the world.” Leon Sun of The Motley Fool takes a closer look at what the deal means to IBM and Twitter.

“Twitter provides a powerful new lens through which to look at the world. This partnership, drawing on IBM’s leading cloud-based analytics platform, will help clients enrich business decisions with an entirely new class of data. This is the latest example of how IBM is reimaging work.” – Ginni Romety, IBM Chairman, President and CEO

-JRL

Categories: 
March 8, 2013

India: Using Global Technology to Go Hyper-Local

Bill Gates once told a journalist that everyone should care about developments in India because the world's largest democracy (of 1.2 billion people) and tenth-largest economy is quickly catching up with us. I recently had the opportunity to see those developments first-hand, and I wholeheartedly agree with Bill's sentiment. Innovation and technology breakthroughs are not owned by or limited to the United States, and as international markets mature, we're going to see more and more entrepreneurship and startup activity overseas. Now I don't mean to imply that the demise of Silicon Valley is imminent, but its influence will be greatly diminished in the future, and that's not necessarily a bad thing.

I just returned from a round-the-world trip that included nearly two weeks in India as part of a 500 Startups-sponsored market exploration tour called Geeks on a Plane. The tour stopped through Bangalore, Mumbai and New Delhi, with meetups for local entrepreneurs, startups, investors and some of the most influential companies in India's technology ecosystem. While in India, I had the chance to meet several SoftLayer customers — including Zoomin, PowerWeave, and Vidya Mantra — and their insight into the growing technology culture in the region was eye-opening.

India

One of the most interesting characteristics shared by many of the entrepreneurs I spoke with was that they were building businesses with a "hyper-local" focus: Unique business models that are specifically geared toward serving local communities while leveraging the latest technologies in mobility and e-commerce. This distinction is particularly noteworthy because they didn't assume that they'd need to succeed in the US market or compete with companies in the US to build their businesses ... And they're absolutely right. The opportunities that exist for hyper-local entrepreneurs in these emerging markets are staggering.

FlipKart is known as "The Amazon of India." It's very similar to the online shopping giant most of us know and use regularly, but with some unique regional twists. For example, because credit card and electronic payments in India are not as prevalent or reliable as they are in much of the world, orders are taken via both an online ordering system and through FlipKart call centers. Once processed, a highly developed network of "scooters" delivers about 50 percent of FlipKart's orders, and the payment is provided at the customer's door — IN CASH. While that might seem simplistic, each courier has a smartphone that allows them to become a geo-located, connected, data sharing entity. Hundreds of millions of dollars in FlipKart orders are delivered each year with very few issues, despite the fact that most of us can't even imagine how the company could operate that way in the US.

Another great example of how innovators are using technology to redefine businesses is redBus, India's largest bus ticketing company. A huge percentage of travel in India is done very inexpensively by bus, and before redBus came on the scene, travelers took their chances by buying tickets through middlemen and ticket brokers, often getting ripped off or becoming victims of double-booking. By centralizing the ticketing process, redBus is able to provide a reliable way to book a seat on any of India's vast system of buses via phone, online or in person. redBus offers the largest selection of bus seats in the country with over 350 bus operators and a flexible network of boarding points, timing and bus types. It's an incredibly simple service that meets a clear need for a hyper-local audience by leveraging the technologies being built and improved around the world.

If my two weeks in India taught me one thing, it was that the startups don't need to conquer international markets ... They can strive to service their local communities and interests, and they'll be just as successful (if not more). Our Catalyst program has just begun its international expansion into India, and the future certainly looks bright. In fact, I'm proud to announce that we've already signed up our first Catalyst program member in India with many more to come!

As we continue working with startup communities around the globe, I learn more and more about how the world is changing, and I get a stronger appreciation for the cultural and economic ties that bind us all together.

Stay tuned!

-@gkdog

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