Posts Tagged 'Intern'

April 15, 2013

The Heart of SoftLayer: People

When I started working for SoftLayer as a software engineer intern, I was skeptical about the company's culture. I read many of the culture posts on the blog, and while they seemed genuine, I was still a little worried about what the work atmosphere would be for a lowly summer intern. Fast-forward almost a year, and I look back on my early concerns and laugh ... I learned quickly that the real heart of SoftLayer is its employees, and the day-to-day operations I observed in the office consistently reinforced that principle.

It's easy to think about SoftLayer as a pure technology company. We provide infrastructure as a service capabilities for businesses with on-demand provisioning and short-term contracts. Our data centers, portal, network and APIs get the spotlight, but those differentiators wouldn't exist without the teams of employees that keep improving them on a daily basis. By focusing on the company culture and making sure employees are being challenged (but not overwhelmed), SoftLayer was indirectly improving the infrastructure we provide to customers.

When I walked into the office for my first day of work, I imagined that I'd be working in a cramped, dimly lit room in the back of the building where I'd be using hand-me-down hardware. When I was led to a good-sized, well-lit room and given a Core i3 laptop with two large monitors and a full suite of software, I started realizing how silly my worries were. I had access to the fully stocked break room, and within about a week, I felt like part of a community rather than a stale workplace.

My coworkers not only made me feel welcome but would frequently go out of their way to make sure I am comfortable and have the resources I needed to succeed. While the sheer amount of new information and existing code was daunting, managers assigned projects that were possible to complete and educational. I was doing useful work building and improving a complex production system rather than the busy work offered by many other employers' internship programs. I learned several new techniques and solidified my understanding of software engineering theory through practice. The open-door policy and friendly people around me not only created a strong sense of community but also allowed more efficient problem solving.

You may have noticed early in this post that I joined the company on a summer internship and that I also told you it's been about a year since I started. While summers in Texas feel long, they don't actually last a full year ... After my internship, I was offered a part-time position as a software engineer, and I'm going to be full-time when I graduate in May.

It's next to impossible to find a company that realizes the importance of its employees and wants to provide an environment for employees to succeed. The undeniable runaway success of the company is proof that SoftLayer's approach to taking care of employees is working.

-John

March 12, 2012

Quantifying Culture: From Intern to Full-Time SLayer

I've worked two months as a full-time employee at SoftLayer, but if you were to ask anyone here, they'd say I've been a SLayer for much longer. They're half right. I've been around, but not as a full-time employee. I started my SoftLayer journey as an intern in the summer before what was supposed to be my last full year of college. After that brief glimpse at what working at SoftLayer was like, I made the decision to condense my senior year into one semester (packed with 33 course credits and countless nights spent in the library) to get back to Dallas to sign on as an official SoftLayer employee. You might wonder why someone would give up her senior year of college to get into the working world ... To me it wasn't about "giving something up" as much as it was about "gaining an opportunity" to work for a company that fosters a culture I genuinely love! I literally could not wait to be back.

There are so many stories I could divulge about my time at SoftLayer — from company events with amusing endings to very thoughtful nicknames to a boss who has transformed into a friend and mentor. I'm not sure how many of these stories would be appreciated to a non-SLayer, and even if I tried to share them, I know they wouldn't do SoftLayer's culture justice. Honestly, I cannot make you understand what makes SoftLayer "SoftLayer." It's not just a name on a building ... It's the experience of getting a group of passionate people in a room to create and innovate. When you're surrounded by that atmosphere, you challenge yourself to be better ... And this blog is a testament to that atmosphere.

I would not consider myself a writer, and I was very hesitant to write this blog. This will be my first contribution to The Innerlayer, and writing the first words on a blank canvas is always intimidating. As I sat at my desk, wracking my brain for where to begin, it took all of five minutes for a fellow employee to recognize my struggles, pick up her laptop and come over to my desk with her work to help me turn my thoughts into words. I don't know of many other companies where it would be normal (or even allowed) to literally bring your work station to another person's desk to share time so generously.

An opportunity to join a culture like that is worth a lot more than a lighter course load and a longer senior year. And it's only one of many examples I can think of that happen on a regular basis that make working at SoftLayer so enjoyable.

Immediately after having finished this blog, I realized I wasn't stumped on the idea of writing a blog ... I was trying to decide how to adequately convey what SoftLayer's culture feels like to someone who doesn't get to experience it. I realize it's a matter of comprehending the incomprehensible. All I can tell you is that I don't regret giving up anything by accelerating my senior year. Truth be told, I am learning more here than any classroom, professor or project could have taught me.

Want to join us? There are more than forty available positions at SoftLayer in all of our worldwide locations. What are you waiting for?

-Katie (aka "KornFed" aka "Kansas" aka "Pippa")*

*I told you there were thoughtful nicknames.

June 13, 2011

Do You Have This in My Size?

For many people (including myself), finding a job this summer was a challenge. Looking back, my classmates and I asked so many questions: Will I find an internship? Will it be paid? Will I have to move? Will they hire me after graduation? You know ... those little details.

When I'm faced with uncertainty, I find myself asking tons of questions like those, and the night before starting my legal internship at SoftLayer, the "new question" machine went into overdrive. How early should I leave to get there on time? What projects will I have? How many hours will I work? Will I make a good impression?

Over the years, I notice that I tend to focus on that last question — "What impression will I make?" Time and time again, I've found myself answering that question by finding the perfect outfit.

What seems like ages ago (but was actually only four years ago), I began pursuing a career in fashion, so while the question, "What should I wear?" might be natural, when looking at any new job, it's probably not the right question to be asking for this one. I'm not exactly required to strut down Fifth Avenue in designer shoes to enter the office of a luxury department store (which I did one summer) ... I'm driving up to the SoftLayer headquarters in Dallas, Texas, where you're more likely to see black T-shirts than suits and ties.

Feeling unsure about whether I can "WOW" some of the brightest people in Dallas in an industry where I am a rookie, I am pretty nervous, and I'm sure everyone has been in my shoes. Some of us ask too many questions, others ask too few, and some, like me, ask the wrong ones. My advice is to focus on one simple question: "Do we fit?" To unpack those three little words a little more, "Will this company value me as much as I value it, and will I enjoy being employed here as much as they enjoy employing me? Will our relationship be mutually beneficial?"

In today's job market, some people can't afford to ask these questions, especially considering the fact that "the right fit" tends to be the toughest aspect to quantify. Hiring and accepting an offer necessarily involves some risk, and the best choice might be decided by a gut feeling. After my first week at SoftLayer, I'm happy to say that I'm sure I made the right choice.

Walking through the office, the atmosphere is laid-back, but don't be fooled. As relaxed and friendly as my coworkers are, they are also working hard, pouring themselves into the work they do. Coming from a business and a legal background, I thought this type of environment was only something I could read about in an article covering a cool new startup in BusinessWeek or the New York Times. Luckily I was wrong.

A company that values an employee's autonomy is hard to find, and it takes the right employees to not abuse that privilege. From my one week of experience here, it's clear SoftLayer has made it work, somehow finding the elusive combination of work, play, and success. That difficult important question is easy to answer: Yes, we fit ... just as perfectly as a Christian Louboutin.

-Sarah

July 10, 2009

The Kinmans are Taking Over

Yeah, it’s official…we have another one: me, even though I’m only a summer intern. The day after my 16th birthday couldn’t have been a better opportunity for me to begin my quest for company domination. Well, I think that will come later.

Anyway, it is my first job at my first company, ever. Softlayer’s really nice. They paid me one hour’s wages for sitting in a conference room and filling out a frightening mountain of paperwork (OK, well, maybe it was more like 5 or 6 forms), and again another day for visiting a few datacenter rooms in the Infomart (I think it was compensation for hearing damage from the noise in the rooms). Michael Scott would have scoffed and turned his empty pockets inside out. Anyway, my point is to tell you that the Kinman clan is taking over Softlayer.

Yep, you got that right.

Steve has 4 kids who will probably grow up and get promoted to manage some section of the company each. Gary’s kid (me) already has a spot, and I’m up to my ears in details about servers, processors, RAM, disk drives, routers, switches, fiber, etc. Heck, maybe Mama Carol and Papa Willie will come back out of retirement to work here too. Oh and Steve’s wife and my mom and…well, you get the idea. If your name is Kinman, you’re gonna work at Softlayer, whether you like it or not.

Someday, you’re gonna wake up in some kind of cubicle in a building on International Parkway and you’re gonna wonder how the heck you ended up there. And HR is just gonna tell you, “Well…your last name IS Kinman…” They may have to stop paying us to fill out forms to keep from going bankrupt because there’s gonna be so many of us. With that in mind, I’d say that the average current non-Kinman Softlayer employee has about three years, plus-or-minus, before the co-worker next to them is, you guessed it, a Kinman. Wow. Congrats Carol and Willie.

…just kidding. But speculation is fun, right? Until it actually happens. Muahahahahaha.

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