Posts Tagged 'Internal'

May 18, 2012

The Weekly Breakdown - Behind the Scenes at SoftLayer

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a renowned scholar in the field of psychology, said, "In large organizations the dilution of information as it passes up and down the hierarchy, and horizontally across departments, can undermine the effort to focus on common goals." That's one of the biggest reasons SoftLayer shares a weekly internal newsletter with SLayers in all departments and in all locations. Keeping coworkers informed of corporate activities (and "common goals") may not be very high on everyone's to-do list, but it's certainly at the top of mine ... literally. As Marketing Coordinator, I'm responsible for sending out a weekly update to ALL SoftLayer staff.

If you have a growing or geographically diverse team, rallying the troops around a shared message is a great way to keep everyone on the same page. If you're not sure where to start with your own internal newsletter, I'd be happy to dissect what goes into our "Weekly Breakdown" as an example you might build from.

SoftLayer Weekly Breakdown

The Weekly Breakdown kicks off with employee birthdays. We want to make sure all 700+ SLayers know when one of their coworkers is getting a year "better," and every month, huge birthday cakes are brought to every office to recognize the SLayers celebrating their birthdays. We haven't written a SoftLayer version of a cheesy-restaurant rendition of the classic "Happy Birthday" song, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time.

BIRTHDAYS THIS WEEK

John Doe 05/17
Jane Smith 05/17
Bill Scurvy 05/18
Kermit the Frog 05/18
Miss Piggy 05/19

In addition to employee birthdays, we'll also call out important days (like SoftLayer's birthday: May 5!) in the birthday section.

The next section in the Breakdown is similar to the "Birthdays" section, but it's a little more relevant to our business: "Anniversaries This Month." When you're hired at SoftLayer, you basically get a SoftLayer birthday, and we want to recognize how long you've been a SLayer:

ANNIVERSARIES THIS MONTH

10 Years!!!!!!!!!!

  • John Doe

8 Years!!!!!!!!

  • Jane Smith
  • Bill Scurvy

5 Years!!!!!

  • Kermit the Frog

1 Year!

  • Miss Piggy

After we recognize the SoftLayer anniversaries, we have a section devoted to keeping employees informed of various activities going on at SoftLayer. That might be a recent press release, an update on holidays or an upcoming company event. This section is the go-to place for employees to know what's new with SoftLayer.

SL SPOTLIGHT

Did you know that SoftLayer employees can get a discount on dedicated servers and CCIs? Talk to any of our sales reps to get started. You will receive a [secret] discount off any dedicated server or a [secret] discount off any CCI!

The next few sections list available SL Job Openings, New Hires from the previous week, and Organizational Changes. Given that SoftLayer is still growing like crazy, we want to make sure all of our employees see the available positions in the organization so they can share with their network of friends or so they can see any opportunities they feel might better suit their talents and passions. It's always nice to know who is helping SoftLayer grow (new employees) and how they are growing with SoftLayer, whether vertically or horizontally (organizational changes).

The next two sections are dedicated to employees "personal" lives: Classifieds and Fundraising Events. These sections let employees list anything they are selling or giving away along with any fundraising activities or events that they, their kids, their neighbor or their dog are involved in. We've had classified items like car wheels, stereos and animal adoptions, and you can bet that employees were voraciously reading the "Fundraising" section when Girl Scout Cookie orders were being taken.

We wrap up the Weekly Breakdown with my favorite section: SoftLayer Praise. There are so many reasons why the section gives me joy. It's amazing how many wonderful comments our customers have about SoftLayer on a weekly basis, and it's a "pat on the back" for teams that may not interact directly with customers on a daily basis. Sharing all of the praise is great for morale, and those little compliments here and there go a long way to making our team continue working hard ... even if just to hear those comments again and again! Here are some of my favorite comments from the past few weeks:

SL Praise

As our business expands we look forward to working with SoftLayer on our projects for many years to come.

My server was down and did not want to come back online without an FSCK. Called support and got a real person on the phone within seconds who was knowledgeable - excellent! He was unable to get the FSCK to run so escalated it. Server Was back online within 10-15 minutes of calling. Thank you. Keep up the great service.

We have been a Customer since 2004 (since the days of servermatrix) and would like to thank you for the wonderful support that we have received over the years. Thank you for an outstanding customer experience!

Great customer services. On numerous occasions was pleasantly surprised.

You people are great!!! I am very Happy with your service. Since 1 year I never face a single server down issue.

Softlayer is the best hosting company I know of, which is why we are hosting with you. You are doing a great job.

I Love SL!

I definitely refer all my colleagues to SoftLayer. Service and quality are amazing!

@SoftLayer always has the coolest stuff at trade shows. I have a shirt from them that is cool enough for me to wear in public!!

SoftLayer it's been wonderful. We been having softlayer rocket battles ... #SENDREINFORCEMENTS

Those kinds of comments can put a smile on any SLayers face! :-)

If you have any wonderful comments to say about SoftLayer or an individual employee, don't be scared to tell us ... Your comment might just be featured in our next "Weekly Breakdown." Comment on this blog, use SoftLayer's "Get Satisfaction" page, tweet @SoftLayer or post to our Facebook page. We love to hearing from you and working hard to remain the "best hosting company [you] know of!"

As you can see, the Weekly Breakdown covers a lot of SoftLayer goodness in a given week. It takes a little work to keep a 700-SLayer organization on the same page, but that work pays off exponentially when the team is able to share accomplishments, praise and goals. I'd highly recommend you trying your own weekly internal newsletter ... Now leave us some SL praise!

-Natalie

December 30, 2011

The Pros and Cons of Two-Factor Authentication

The government (FISMA), banks (PCI) and the healthcare industry are huge proponents of two-factor authentication, a security measure that requires two different kinds of evidence that you are who you say you are ... or that you should have access to what you're trying to access. In many cases, it involves using a combination of a physical device and a secure password, so those huge industries were early adopters of the practice. In our definition, two-factor authentication is providing "something you know, and something you have." When you're talking about national security, money or people's lives, you don't want someone with "password" as their password to unwittingly share his or her access to reams valuable information.

What is there not to like about two-factor identification?

That question is one of the biggest issues I've run into as we continue pursuing compliance and best practices in security ... We can turn on two-factor authentication everywhere – the portal, the vpn, the PoPs, internal servers, desktops, wireless devices – and make the entire SoftLayer IS team hate us, or we can tell all the admins, auditors and security chiefs of the world to harden their infrastructure without it.

Regardless of which direction we go, someone isn't going to like me when this decision is made.

There are definite pros and cons of implementing and requiring two-factor authentication everywhere, so I started a running list that I've copied below. At the end of this post, I'd love for you to weigh in with your thoughts on this subject. Any ideas and perspective you can provide as a customer will help us make informed decisions as we move forward.

Pros

  • It's secure. Really secure.
  • It is a great deterrent. Why even try to hack an account when you know a secondary token is going to be needed (and only good for a few seconds)?
  • It can keep you or your company from being in the news for all the wrong reasons!

Cons

  • It's slow and cumbersome ... Let's do some math, 700 employees, 6 logins per day on average means 4200 logins per day. Assume 4 seconds per two-factor login, and you're looking at 16,800 extra seconds (4.66 hours) a day shifted from productivity to simply logging into your systems.
  • Users have to "have" their "something you have" all the time ... Whether that's an iPhone, a keyfob or a credit card-sized token card.
  • RSA SecureID was HACKED! I know of at least one financial firm that had to turn off two-factor authentication after this came up.
  • People don't like the extra typing.
  • System Administrators hate the overhead on their systems and the extra points of failure.

As you can start to see, the volume of cons out weigh out the pros, but the comparison isn't necessarily quantitative. If one point is qualitatively more significant than two hundred contrasting points, which do you pay attention to? If you say "the significant point," then the question becomes how we quantify the qualitativeness ... if that makes any sense.

I had been a long-time hater of two-factor authentication because of my history as a Windows sysadmin, but as I've progressed in my career, I hate to admit that I became a solid member of Team Two-Factor and support its merits. I think the qualitative significance of the pros out weigh the quantitative advantage the cons have, so as much as it hurts, I now get to try to sway our senior systems managers to the dark side as well.

If you support my push for further two-factor authentication implementation, wish me luck ('cause I will need it). If you're on Team Anti-Two-Factor, let me know what they key points are when you've decided against it.

-@skinman454

November 15, 2010

A New Twist on Communication

I recently heard an interesting story about one step that a CIO took to help improve the communication within his internal team. Now, I’m not sure what the backstory was, but in the various technology teams I’ve been over the years, when organizational discussions turn to topics such as “how can we get better”, “what do we need to improve”, “how do we achieve our goals”, etc, they seem to boil down to a handful of key items. Communication always seems to be on this list and is also frequently listed as the partial (or full) cause of many IT problems that have occurred.

So what did the CIO in question do? He hired an Internal Communications Director for his organization. I don’t work at this company and don’t have the insight into what this person does on a daily basis or the goals for the position, but I would like to speculate on what having a Internal Communications Director might do for an IT organization…

How helpful would it be to technology projects and key initiatives to have someone that specifically focused on:

  • Getting the right information to the right people at the right time (especially cross project) to make more informed decisions
  • Letting everyone know what projects are being worked on and how they affect others so that cross team dependencies have the chance of surfacing earlier in than later.
  • Keep the team informed on recent and upcoming organizational changes (how many times have you found out that Bob or Jane is no longer in charge of a group or is no longer with the company weeks or months after the change)

I know, it just sounds like an upper level project management thing or simple administrative tasks at this point, but the other side of a traditional Communication Director is that they manage external communications, aka Public Relations.

You could have a person helping you sell IT to your internal (and external) customers who is actually trained and has specific experience in this type of work. Maybe they could help you repair a damaged image / perception of your IT shop or keep you from making a LeBron “The Decision” PR mistake. They could also promote your agenda and help you get you message across effectively.

Many of these thing happen organically to some extent in most organizations, but having a person focused on making them happen might dramatically increase the chances of them being more effective. I don’t know if we’ll ever get to the point where we’ve solved the communication problems in IT, but hiring an Internal Communications Director sure seems to be an interesting step…

-Bradley

Categories: 
Subscribe to internal