Posts Tagged 'Interview'

March 11, 2011

3 Bars | 3 Questions: SoftLayer Sales

Will Charnock put me in the hot seat at the end of his 3 Bars | 3 Questions interview last week, so I welcomed Kevin into my office virtually to have a quick chat. He came equipped with three good questions about my experience with SoftLayer SLales, and I did my best to give three good answers. Here were the questions:

  1. What makes SoftLayer different from any of the other companies you've worked for?
  2. When you're hiring a new sales representative, what do you look for in that person?
  3. What are you most excited about when it comes to the next few months at SoftLayer from a sales perspective?

This week, we used a High Definition video chat, and the quality is pretty impressive. We're still working to improve and tweak the format and quality of these videos, so you might notice a few blips in the audio recording, but we'll get those ironed out soon.

All in all, the video chat was a lot of fun, and I'm looking forward to watching Drew Jenkins enjoy it in the next episode!

-Tom

March 4, 2011

3 Bars | 3 Questions: IPv6

Thanks to Marc's vote, I had the distinct honor of being the third guest on our "3 Bars | 3 Questions" series. The topic of conversation: IPv6.

Are we in a "The sky is falling!" situation yet? How can customers put pressure on their ISPs and software providers to add IPv6 support? How long with ARIN and SoftLayer have IPv4 addresses to give out now that IANA has released their entire free pool? Here's my take:

This video was recorded while Kevin was standing outside the Moscone Center in San Francisco at GDC 2011 over a mobile hotspot connection, so the video quality suffered a little. To silence the street noise, Kevin muted his side of the conversation as I spoke.

-Will

February 3, 2010

Custom Server Solutions

The other day I was at a well known coffee shop (take a wild guess) and was steamrolled by all of the marketing hype. Try this! Take one of these home! Only for a limited time! Often the presentation of too many options makes the decision a lot more difficult. I know it’s just coffee or tea but now I have the sudden urge to collect them all! And despite years of caffeine conditioning I don’t think my heart, stomach, or my bank account could take a collecting and consuming of all. I’m looking for something different this time, but again, too many options. The next logical step is asking the Barista what their favorite is. I figure they spend their entire workday around the stuff; they MUST have a good recommendation. All I was really looking for here was a “get this” and call it good. Only after I asked, did I remember that most people who frequent this caliber of coffee joint are really particular about their coffee. I, however, am not one of the ¼ soy milk, ¼ cream, no froth, low-fat, exactly 1723 crystals of sugar type of people, so I’m not really prepared for what comes next. Instead of a one-size-fits-all answer, I’m getting a barrage of questions about my preferences. While this was not really what I was after, it hit me that this Barista is building me a solution. I did, in fact, leave with a tasty seasonal coffee, custom tailored to my needs. Servers are a lot like coffee, they rely on gratuitous amounts of caffeine to be any good; that and, there is usually never a generic solution that is going to suit your needs. The sales team at SoftLayer is not there solely to assist you in placing an order for you; they are there to ask you questions about your intentions with the server so they can recommend the best possible solution. You can have your low-fat CentOS with a double-shot of 5570’s with “venti” gigs of ram. Just ask our sales team to brew you up a solution.

June 20, 2007

An Interview With an Elevator

SL: Good morning, thank you for taking the time to meet with me.
Elevator: Ding.

SL: Excellent. How would you describe the costs maintaining efficiencies in a hosting environment?
Elevator: Going up.

SL: Well, I think that’s obvious, depending on where you start. Perhaps a better way to phrase this would be, “How would you recommend leveraging existing technologies to implement an efficient execution of a hosting environment?”
Elevator: Ground floor

SL: Well said. I agree that it becomes difficult to put solutions into place after-the-fact, and that in order to run smoothly one must start with a solid plan and avoid retrofitting later. That ends up being far too costly and stifles resources a company should be using to grow their product. How would you describe the attitude of most large hosts with regards to “going green”?
Elevator: Please step away from the door.

SL: I too think that many datacenters out there are concerned with “stepping through” as it were to move operations in that direction. But, since the datacenters can hugely benefit from cost-savings due to reduced expenditures for cooling and power, it is very much worth the shift. What factors outside of the DC could play into making this shift easier?
Elevator: Lobby

SL: Well, I’m not sure that lobbying is the answer, though it may help. Really I was asking about computer manufacturers making the shift to properly-matched and high efficiency power supplies and processors. New technologies are making it easier for younger companies to go green, and older hosts are left trying to figure out how they can turn thousands of antiquated servers into efficient appliances. This goes back to your earlier comment regarding starting out with a solid plan making it easier to
Elevator: Ding

SL: Don’t interrupt me. Easier to maintain a plan than adjust and retrofit to a new one.
Elevator: Second Floor

SL: I’m not sure why you said that, it doesn’t make any sense. Having a host that doesn’t play catch-up constantly benefits the customer in several
Elevator: Ding

SL: Stop it.
Elevator: Third Floor

SL: You’re an idiot. I’m going to go interview the printer.

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