Posts Tagged 'Language'

October 24, 2011

NOT Lost in Translation

When I attend conferences, I always try to make sure that I communicate what we do the best way I can. With our new data centers opening up in Singapore and Amsterdam, I was curious to see what a SoftLayer message would look like in the two countries' most prominent languages. With the gracious help from local representatives, we have our English message translated into Mandarin, Malay and Dutch.

English
We are the largest private hosting company in the world, providing cloud, dedicated, managed and integrated computing environments to over 25,000 customers around the world. We have recently added additional data centers and now have facilities in Amsterdam, Dallas, Houston, San Jose, Seattle, Singapore and Washington D.C., and network Points of Presence worldwide. On top of that, we have automated every part of our platform, giving our customers complete control, security, scalability and ease-of-management through the best Customer Portal and Open API in the industry.

Mandarin
我们是世界上最大的私人网站住办有限公司,带给全球超过25000客户的服务包括云计算,专用主机,主机托管和综合计算。最近,我们增加了额外的数据中心,现在已在阿姆斯特丹,达拉斯,休斯顿,圣何塞,西雅图,新加坡,华盛顿等拥有设施,网点遍布全球。最重要的是,我们自动化了每一个平台的部分,用同行业最好的客户门户和开放的API体系为客户提供完整的控制,集安全性,可扩展性,和易于管理与一体的服务。

Malay
Kami adalah syarikat swasta yang terbesar di dunia yang menyediakan pengkomputeran awan (cloud), hos berdedikasi yang diurus dan diintegrasikan ke dalam infrastruktur pengkomputeran untuk lebih daripada 25,000 pelanggan kami di seluruh dunia. Kami baru-baru ini telah menambah pusat data tambahan dan kini mempunyai kemudahan-kemudahan di Amsterdam, Dallas, Houston, San Jose, Seattle, Singapura dan Washington DC dan juga rangkaian "Points of Presence" di seluruh dunia. Selain itu, Kami telah mengautomatikkan setiap bahagian platform kami, memberikan para pelanggan kami penuh kuasa dan kawalan, keselamatan, kemampuan yang luas dan kemudahan pengurusan menggunakan pelanggan portal kami yang terbaik dan API terbuka (Open API) di dalam industri ini.

Dutch
Wij zijn het grootste, private hosting bedrijf in de wereld dat voorziet in cloud, dedicated, managed and integrated computing-omgevingen voor meer dan 25.000 klanten wereldwijd. We hebben recent extra datacenters toegevoegd en hebben nu vestigingen in Amsterdam, Dallas, Houston, San Jose, Seattle, Singapore en Washington DC en netwerk Points of Presence over de hele wereld. Bovendien hebben we elk deel van ons platform geautomatiseerd, waardoor wij onze klanten volledige controle, beveiliging, schaalbaarheid en gemak van beheer bieden met behulp van het beste Customer Portal en Open API in deze bedrijfstak

Back to English
While I might not be able to communicate those translations in conversation (yet), it's an incredible visualization of how SoftLayer is growing and changing. It's also exciting to think about how many more languages we'll need to include next year!

-Summer

February 14, 2011

The Black Cat

"Dogma." "Religion." What comes to mind when you hear these words? In the real world, you might think of Christianity, Islam, or Judaism. In the political world, you might think of Communism vs. Freedom. Closer to home, you might think of "red state" and "blue state."

Computers are deterministic, logical machines, yet they too have all the trappings of the world's major religions and dogmas. The desktop world is dominated by Microsoft and Apple to use the religion metaphor. All computing worlds could be broken down into "proprietary" and "open source" if we are talking about dogma.

Relevant to this discussion, the web development world has three major religions in those two dogmas: Microsoft's ASP.NET, the PHP world, and the Java world. My platform of choice has always been ASP.NET.

I am pretty solid in my reasons for preferring it over all others, and also pretty clear about the accidental reasons I found myself in this camp. Much how someone born into a particular religion is likely to freely adopt it at some point, I too ended up adopting ASP.NET for reasons that were nothing more than accidental.

I consider myself a 'citizen of the world' in more ways than one, and the opportunity to work at SoftLayer was an opportunity I couldn't turn down. I had to check my biases at the door, open my mind, and see how this side of the aisle does business. (And as if to remind me that a dogmatic shift has occurred in my professional life, Fox News continues to greet me every morning at the top of the stairs.)

To admit just some of my biases: How on earth did you build an enterprise-grade portal with a weakly typed language that doesn't require something as basic as a compiler? More importantly: Why? How does one work with such a thing? Some of you still use VI?? Seriously?

Fast forward about six months — just enough to say I am "proficient" in PHP and to have an exposure to the database side of things. The journey and rants are long and technical, but it should come as no surprise that I still prefer the Microsoft ecosystem over one based on PHP. I find it easier to work with, faster, and less error-prone than the alternative. The language is more structured, the tooling is better, and the framework better established and developer-oriented.

Humor me with this for a moment.

Assume for the sake of argument that my belief is correct — that Microsoft's offerings are indeed better than PHP's on every metric a developer can measure. If this is true, one might reasonably conclude that SoftLayer erred in its choice of development platform. Even though I will be the first to evangelize the virtues of the Microsoft ecosystem, I'll also be the first to say that this conclusion is wrong.

The conclusion is wrong because in asking the "Why?" in "Why SoftLayer chose the platform it did," I approached the question from the perspective of what's best for the developer. The question should have instead been phrased as: "What does SoftLayer's choice of platform say about our core values?"

It isn't exactly open source. Place the source code on any laptop, and you'll get the modern-day equivalent of summary execution: You will be fired.

It isn't developer convenience. It isn't needed. From what I've seen here, the developers have used their tools in a more extensive and architecturally correct way than I have in my time in the ASP.NET ecosystem.

The elusive answer can be summed up in one word: Independence. Fierce independence if you're into using superlatives.

While the Microsoft ecosystem may be the easiest on developers, it comes at price. Microsoft's ultimate responsibility is to the thousands of people that use its tools, so it has to steer its platforms in a way that fit the disparate needs of the many developers who rely on them. In relying on its own software, built on open-source offerings, SoftLayer can steer its platform in a way that benefits SoftLayer ... It has only its own needs to consider.

The soundness of this reality — and indeed, the necessity of being fully independent when one's core offering is the basic infrastructure that runs people's businesses should be obvious.

Very often we become overprotective of our dogmas, and fear that which we do not fully understand. To that end, I try to remember the words of an unlikely capitalist: "It doesn't matter if a cat is black or white, so long as it catches mice."

-George

October 8, 2008

Mulch Ado About Nothing

A couple of weekends ago, I decided to enjoy some of the cooler temperatures (yes 90 degrees in Dallas is considered a cold front in September) and take care of a little yard work. One of my tasks was cleaning up the flower beds and installing a fresh batch of mulch. At my side was my trusty, eager, and willing sidekick “Deuce”, my three year old son. When I grabbed my shiny new shovel, he ran to the garage to grab his shiny blue (plastic) shovel. There was a question for every move and every object that was foreign to him “What’s that?”, “That’s yours?”, “Where’s mine?” Is there any thing called child physics, because with my kid, for every action, there is an equal and opposite question.

Anyway, with the weeds all pulled and the shrubs all trimmed, it was time to pull out that big bag of cedar mulch. As soon as I opened the bag, Deuce opened his mouth, “What’s that?” “Mulch” I replied. He looked at the bag; looked at me; back to the bag; then back at me… He gave me a confused look of disbelief and said almost disappointedly, “That’s wood sips!” (He has a little trouble with “ch” sounds sometimes). “That’s wood sips daddy!” he said again this time raising a palm full of chips above his head to make sure I got a good look of the stuff that I had mistakenly referred to as mulch. At that point, I was reminded by my three year old of a lesson that was taught and repeated to me many times before; “Call it like you see it!”

I think a lot of individuals, organizations and companies get in their own way by trying to characterize $2 tasks with $10 words. I’ve been as guilty as everyone else, more so in my experiences as a project manager than anything else. I’ve asked for an estimate on the release of the agreed upon deliverables that I and other stakeholders have a vested interest in before when I could have easily just asked “When will you have that done for us?” There’s no room for misinterpretation there? There’s irony in the thought that part of the purpose of the project management “discipline” is to promote a common language to make it easier to engage with others involved in the project. I’m not making that up.

At SoftLayer, we have an assortment of people from various professional, geographical and personal backgrounds. Though we do have “projects” that we “manage” we try not to get caught up in volleying high dollar “project management” verbiage over cubicle walls. We can’t afford to get things lost in communication so we tend to “call it like we see it”. I encourage you to try it for yourself. The next time you’re tempted to request the outputs from the user validation activities on your project, simply ask for the test results. The next time you’re tempted to order a “Grande Drip” from Starbucks, ask for a medium coffee. And, the next time you head to your local hardware store for a day of gardening on a “not so hot” hot day, be sure to get a big bag of “wood sips!”

-DJ

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May 9, 2008

Industry-Wide Language Barrier

What language do we speak here at Softlayer? What language is spoken across the industry? Is it the same, or does everyone have their own code for translation?

It seems that in the “on demand datacenter industry”, “hosting industry”, “dedicated server industry” (or whatever you prefer to call it) each company or provider has its own idea and way of projecting who they are. These projections are seldom in line with one another and have a slight difference only to give some idea of separation.

The biggest grey area that I have seen and something that gets distorted is the idea of managed services and just the term “management” in general seems to have lost any kind of universal meaning. The thing that I run into most is when a customer asks us if we are a managed company. I find this to be a loaded question knowing what I know of the industry and other providers. The reason is that you can call your service anything you want to and even come up with clever and creative names for it, but at the end of the day creative marketing doesn’t get results when the rubber meets the road.

It is imperative that the correct expectations are set so that customers aren’t lead astray and find themselves in a situation that they were unprepared for because they were disillusioned by gimmicky wording. Softlayer has the reputation of being an honorable company and I am proud to be a part of that. We do not consider ourselves to be a managed service, but we do offer support and help in many situations. We have support staff here 24 hours every day of the year that can help you, or possibly help point you in a good direction for you to be able to help yourself. We offer OS updates and patches at no additional charge automatically. We strive to be as upfront and fair on everything from the bottom to the top, so I feel that it is my duty to explain this situation in more detail. In fact, all of our sales representatives and many of our customers have felt this same way. What I have found is that this upfront and honest explanation is a rarity and that many companies are not as forthcoming as they could be or should be when discussing “managed services”.

There are a lot of companies who provide the exact same services as we do and call this being “fully managed”. There are others who promise the moon and a shoe shine with their service and then just come up short on the efforts. Now, this may not be entirely their fault because they may have excellent intentions, but a poor and impractical business model. However, intentions don’t get results and customers are the ones who pay most for the misrepresentation. The worst situation is when someone pays a huge premium for a service that is overpromised and then severely under delivered. When I am able to talk to someone who has been in this situation they really appreciate the options and control that they have over every aspect of their service when choosing Softlayer as their provider. The only satisfaction I can get is helping people that have been taken advantage of find a provider that they know they can count on and exactly what they can expect.

This elaboration of services extends beyond server management. No matter what buzz words a company may want to use to describe your company (“largest”, “best”, “heroic”, “ultimate”, really just fill in the blank on this if you’ve been around long enough.) the main thing that matters in this industry is functionality. I am confident in saying that no other company can offer anything close to what Softlayer can provide. Softlayer provides options and capabilities which are unparalleled in the industry in order to give customers complete control over their hardware and thus their own business. There are some that have tried to copy our model and others who have tried to produce a stop-gap solution between what they offer and what we offer, but they have failed. Is this, perhaps, a key reason why we have been able to sustain our high level of growth and remain stable? Possibly. Is this a sign that the best is yet to come with Softlayer? Definitely.

If you want to talk about situations or projects you may have coming up, I would be happy to speak with you and help come up with a solution that will maximize your businesses potential. In fact my entire team is here for this specific purpose.

-Doug

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