Posts Tagged 'London'

July 14, 2014

London Just Got Cloudier—LON02 is LIVE!

Summer at SoftLayer is off to a great start. As of today, customers can order SoftLayer servers in our new London data center! This facility is SoftLayer's second data center in Europe (joining Amsterdam in the region), and it's one of the most anticipated facilities we've ever opened.

London is the second SoftLayer data center to go live this year, following last month's data center launch in Hong Kong. In January, IBM committed to investing $1.2 billion to expand our cloud footprint, and it's been humbling and thrilling at the same time to prepare for all of this growth. And this is just the beginning.

When it comes to the Europe, Middle East, and Africa region (EMEA), SoftLayer's largest customer base is in the U.K. For the last two and a half years I’ve been visiting London quite frequently, and I've met hundreds of customers who are ecstatic to finally have a SoftLayer data center in their own backyard. As such, I'm especially excited about this launch. With this data center launch, they get our global platform with a local address.

The SoftLayer Network

Customers with location-sensitive workloads can have their data reside within the U.K. Customers with infrastructure in Amsterdam can use London to add in-region redundancy to their environments. And businesses that target London's hyper-competitive markets can deliver unbelievable performance to their users. LON02 is fully integrated with the entire SoftLayer platform, so bare metal and virtual servers in the new data center are seamlessly connected to servers in every other SoftLayer data center around the world. As an example of what that means in practice, you can replicate or integrate data between servers in London and Amsterdam data centers with stunning transfer speeds. For free. You can run your databases on bare metal in London, keep backups in Amsterdam, spin up virtual servers in Asia and the U.S. And your end users get consistent, reliable performance—as though the servers were in the same rack. Try beating that!

London is a vibrant, dynamic, and invigorating city. It's consistently voted one of the best places for business in the region. It's considered a springboard for Europe, attracting more foreign investors than any other location in the region. A third of world’s largest companies are headquartered in London, and with our new data center, we're able to serve them even more directly. London is also the biggest tech hub in-region and the biggest incubator for technology startups and entrepreneurs in Europe. These cloud-native organizations have been pushing the frontiers of technology, building their businesses on our Internet-scale platform for years, so we're giving them an even bigger sandbox to play in. My colleagues from Catalyst, our startup program, have established solid partnerships with organizations such as Techstars, Seedcamp and Wayra UK, so (as you can imagine) this news is already making waves in the U.K. startup universe.

For me, London will always be the European capitol of marketing and advertising (and a strong contender for the top spot in the global market). In fact, two thirds of international advertising agencies have their European headquarters in London, and the city boasts the highest density of creative firms of any other city or region in the world. Because digital marketing and advertising use cases are some of the most demanding technological workloads, we're focused on meeting the needs of this market. These customers require speed, performance, and global reach, and we deliver. Can you imagine RTB (real-time-bidding) with network lag? An ad pool for multinationals that is accessible in one region, but not so much in another? A live HD digital broadcast to run on shared, low-I/O machines? Or a 3D graphic rendering based on a purely virtualized environment? Just thinking about those scenarios makes me cringe, and it reinforces my excitement for our new data center in London.

MobFox, a customer who happens to be the largest mobile ad platform in Europe and in the top five globally, shares my enthusiasm. MobFox operates more than 150 billion impressions per month for clients including Nike, Heineken, EA, eBay, BMW, Netflix, Expedia, and McDonalds (as a comparison I was told that Twitter does about 7 billion+ a month). Julian Zehetmayr, the brilliant 23-year-old CEO of MobFox, agreed that London is a key location for businesses operating in digital advertising space and expressed his excitement about the opportunity we’re bringing his company.

I could go on and on about why this news is soooo good. But instead, I'll let you experience it yourself. Order bare metal or virtual servers in London, and save $500 on your first month service.

Celebrate a cloudy summer in London!

-Michalina

March 21, 2012

Server Challenge = Global Domination?

The Server Challenge has become an all-out attraction. What started out as a little game we brought to SxSW last year has evolved into a competition attendees anxiously await. In the past month, we've had two phenomenal Server Challenge competitions — one at the Technology for Marketing and Advertising (TFM&A) conference in London and the other at Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco — and it's only getting bigger.

At TFM&A, we had a steady stream of competitors step up to the Server Challenge installation that lives in Europe. Quite a few of them were lured to our booth after trying their hands at the challenge during its European debut at Cloud Expo Europe in January. The winning time at TFM&A of 1:10.08 was recorded by Gary Barclay in the midst of some fierce competition.

SoftLayer Server Challenge - TFM&A

To give you a unique look at what it's like to experience the Server Challenge, we set up a time-lapse camera with a bird's eye view over the timer, and we pulled out a few of our favorite "Start!" shots:

Back in North America as things were humming along in London, our second Server Challenge box was making its way to San Francisco. We were able to share the Server Challenge with the GDC community last year at GDC Online in Austin, and we learned that there is nothing better than bringing a game to a conference full of gamers. I guess you could call it a match made in game developer heaven because we broke the record of number of server challenge participants for a single conference! Not only did we have a ton of participants, we had a huge number that returned day after day to keep pushing the record time lower and lower. All of this attention definitely left the booth staffers pretty exhausted, but we felt kinda like "the cool kids" all week.

On the last day of the conference, I talked to a few of the repeat participants who spent a lot of time at our booth, and I asked them a few questions about the Server Challenge. The first question I asked was, "Why do you like the Server Challenge?" and the responses were extremely interesting. Many said they liked the game so much because it was so interactive while others were drawn to the game because it gave them a way to win an iPad with skill rather than having to be "lucky" in a drawing. Because you don't have to know anything about server assembly to be good at it, it was universal, and it was quite a spectacle when dozens of people crowded around to get their own strategy and prepare for their turns.

I captured a few of their responses on video:

Given the crowd around the booth, you could assume the competition would be close, and you'd be absolutely correct. EJ Fernald won with a time of 1:06.06, beating the second place time by 0.15 seconds ... Yes, 15 hundredths of a second.

Congrats, Gary and EJ!! We hope you enjoy your new iPads!

If you want to be the next lucky winner of an iPad, check out our blog post with tips on how to be the fastest and start practicing ... if you happen to have a few retired servers lying around somewhere. If you're a SoftLayer customer, you can use the ones you replaced with all of your new SoftLayer servers!

-Summer

February 3, 2012

Server Hardware "Show and Tell" at Cloud Expo Europe

Bringing server hardware to a "Cloud Expo" is like bringing a knife to a gun fight. Why would anyone care about hardware? Isn't "the cloud" a magical land where servers and data centers cease to exist and all that matters is that your hardware-abstracted hypervisor can scale elastically on demand?

You might be surprised how many attendees at Cloud Expo Europe expressed that sentiment in one way or another when SoftLayer showed up in London with the infamous Server Challenge last week. Based on many of the conversations I had with attendees, some of the most basic distinctions and characteristics of physical and virtual environments are widely misunderstood. Luckily, we had a nice little server rack to use as a visual while talking about how SoftLayer fits in (and stands out) when it comes to "the cloud."

When we didn't have a line of participants waiting to try their hand at our in-booth competition, we were able to use it to "show and tell" what a cloud hardware architecture might look like and what distinguishes SoftLayer from some of the other infrastructure providers in the industry. We're able to show our network-within-a-newtork topology, we explain the pod concept of our data centers and how that streamlines our operations, and we talk about our system automation and how that speeds up the provisioning of both physical and virtual environments. Long-term memory is aided by the use of multiple senses, so when each attendee can see and touch what they're hearing about in our booth, they have a much better chance to remember the conversation in the midst of dozens (if not hundreds) they have before and after they talk to us.

And by the time we finish using the Server Challenge as a visual, the attendee is usually ready to compete. As you probably noticed if you caught the Cloud Expo Europe album at Facebook.com/SoftLayer, the competition was pretty intense. In fact, the winning time of 1:08.16 was set just about twenty minutes before the conference ended ... In the short video below, Phil presents the winner of the Cloud Expo Europe Server Challenge with his iPad 2 and asks for some insight about how he was able to pull off the victory:

Being the international debut of the Server Challenge, we were a bit nervous that the competition wouldn't have as much appeal as we've seen in the past, but given the response we received from attendees, it's pretty safe to say it's not the last time you'll see the Server Challenge abroad.

To all of the participants who competed last week, thanks for stopping by our booth, and we hope you're enjoying your "torch" (if you beat the 2:00.00 flashlight-winning time)!

-@khazard

May 24, 2011

Bringing Servers (and Koozies) to Europe!

A couple of weeks ago, I was lucky enough to get to travel to Internet World in London for SoftLayer's first exposition at a tradeshow in the UK. With a new data center opening soon in Amsterdam, I was really excited to get to share our story and our vision for the future with a new audience.

I expected a few differences as I approached conversations at the show - accents, verbiage, thoughts on what this cloud stuff actually means, etc. - but as long as I could speak my Texan version of the language, I'd be able to explain who SoftLayer is and what we do ... With a few questions about what in the world a "switch ball" is and how it works. Here's a quick demonstration from GDC in San Francisco this year:

It's pretty funny to see the inventive ways conference attendees approach our giveaways ... The switch balls are often confused as puzzles and our frisbees are thought of as hats. At every tradeshow, people are fascinated with our giveaways, but Internet World provided a unique fascination: the "Koozie."

While the SoftLayer switch balls are always a huge hit (that we run out of at every show), what really seemed to intrigue the attendees in London were the SoftLayer Koozies - insulated can coolers. Most attendees thought the Koozies were cell phone holders initially, but once we explained that they are meant to keep your beer cold and your hand dry, they were surprisingly excited to have an opportunity to get a beer to test their Koozie out.

After coming across a few blank stares, giving some explanations and watching "Aha!" moments, I asked a few of the attendees why Koozies were not popular in Europe. The two most common responses: They drink their beer so fast it does not have time to get warm, and Europeans drink their beer warm. To me, drinking warm beer sounds really gross, but the next time I am in the UK, I will have to give it a fair shot ... Maybe the fact that they drink their beer warm is a result of not having a Koozie to keep their hand dry and their beer cold, so we might have brought about a monumental shift in European alcohol consumption! :-)

After demystifying the switch balls and Koozies, I think we did a great job sharing SoftLayer with our new audience, and I can tell that our space in Amsterdam won't be empty for very long after we open the doors there. If you stopped by the booth, I hope you went out of your way to get a cold beverage to test the amazing Koozie technology.

-Summer

Subscribe to london