Posts Tagged 'Modsecurity'

April 29, 2013

Web Development - Installing mod_security with OWASP

You want to secure your web application, but you don't know where to start. A number of open-source resources and modules exist, but that variety is more intimidating than it is liberating. If you're going to take the time to implement application security, you don't want to put your eggs in the wrong basket, so you wind up suffering from analysis paralysis as you compare all of the options. You want a powerful, flexible security solution that isn't overly complex, so to save you the headache of making the decision, I'll make it for you: Start with mod_security and OWASP.

ModSecurity (mod_security) is an open-source Apache module that acts as a web application firewall. It is used to help protect your server (and websites) from several methods of attack, most common being brute force. You can think of mod_security as an invisible layer that separates users and the content on your server, quietly monitoring HTTP traffic and other interactions. It's easy to understand and simple to implement.

The challenge is that without some advanced configuration, mod_security isn't very functional, and that advanced configuration can get complex pretty quickly. You need to determine and set additional rules so that mod_security knows how to respond when approached with a potential threat. That's where Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) comes in. You can think of the OWASP as an enhanced core ruleset that the mod_security module will follow to prevent attacks on your server.

The process of getting started with mod_security and OWASP might seem like a lot of work, but it's actually quite simple. Let's look at the installation and configuration process in a CentOS environment. First, we want to install the dependencies that mod_security needs:

## Install the GCC compiler and mod_security dependencies ##
$ sudo yum install gcc make
$ sudo yum install libxml2 libxml2-devel httpd-devel pcre-devel curl-devel

Now that we have the dependencies in place, let's install mod_security. Unfortunately, there is no yum for mod_security because it is not a maintained package, so you'll have to install it directly from the source:

## Get mod_security from its source ##
$ cd /usr/src
$ git clone https://github.com/SpiderLabs/ModSecurity.git

Now that we have mod_security on our server, we'll install it:

## Install mod_security ##
$ cd ModSecurity
$ ./configure
$ make install

And we'll copy over the default mod_security configuration file into the necessary Apache directory:

## Copy configuration file ##
$ cp modsecurity.conf-recommended /etc/httpd/conf.d/modsecurity.conf

We've got mod_security installed now, so we need to tell Apache about it ... It's no use having mod_security installed if our server doesn't know it's supposed to be using it:

## Apache configuration for mod_security ##
$ vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

We'll need to load our Apache config file to include our dependencies (BEFORE the mod_security module) and the mod_security file module itself:

## Load dependencies ##
LoadFile /usr/lib/libxml2.so
LoadFile /usr/lib/liblua5.1.so
## Load mod_security ##
LoadModule security2_module modules/mod_security2.so

We'll save our configuration changes and restart Apache:

## Restart Apache! ##
$ sudo /etc/init.d/httpd restart

As I mentioned at the top of this post, our installation of mod_security is good, but we want to enhance our ruleset with the help of OWASP. If you've made it this far, you won't have a problem following a similar process to install OWASP:

## OWASP ##
$ cd /etc/httpd/
$ git clone https://github.com/SpiderLabs/owasp-modsecurity-crs.git
$ mv owasp-modsecurity-crs modsecurity-crs

Just like with mod_security, we'll set up our configuration file:

## OWASP configuration file ##
$ cd modsecurity-crs
$ cp modsecurity_crs_10_setup.conf.example modsecurity_crs_10_config.conf

Now we have mod_security and the OWASP core ruleset ready to go! The last step we need to take is to update the Apache config file to set up our basic ruleset:

## Apache configuration ##
$ vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

We'll add an IfModule and point it to our new OWASP rule set at the end of the file:

<IfModule security2_module>
    Include modsecurity-crs/modsecurity_crs_10_config.conf
    Include modsecurity-crs/base_rules/*.conf
</IfModule>

And to complete the installation, we save the config file and restart Apache:

## Restart Apache! ##
$ sudo /etc/init.d/httpd restart

And we've got mod_security installed with the OWASP core ruleset! With this default installation, we're leveraging the rules the OWASP open source community has come up with, and we have the flexibility to tweak and enhance those rules as our needs dictate. If you have any questions about this installation or you have any other technical blog topics you'd like to hear from us about, please let us know!

-Cassandra

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