Posts Tagged 'New Job'

September 22, 2014

Becoming a SLayer in Hong Kong

When I came on board at SoftLayer, the company was at the beginning of a growth period. IBM had just invested $1.2 billion to build 15 new data centers all over the world including one in Hong Kong—I was excited to get to work there!

Before I joined the Hong Kong data center’s Go Live Team as a server build tech, I went through a lengthy interview process. At the time, I was working for a multinational bank. But after the Chinese New Year, something inside me said it was time to take on a new challenge. Many people in Chinese cities look for new opportunities around the New Year; they believe it will give them luck and fortune.

After much anticipation (and interviews and paperwork), my first day was finally here. When I arrived at the SoftLayer data center, I walked through glass security doors and was met by Jesse Arnold, SoftLayer’s Hong Kong site manager; Russell Mcguire, SoftLayer’s Go Live Team leader whom I met during my interview process; and Shahzad, my colleague who was also starting work that day.

Shahzad and I felt very welcomed and were excited to be joining the team. During our first-day tour, I took a deep breath and said to myself, “You can do this Ying! This is transition, and we never stop learning new things in life.” Learning new things can be challenging. It involves mental, physical, and emotional strength.

Inside the Data Center: Building Racks!

When our team began to build racks and work with cables it was uncharted, but not totally unfamiliar territory for me. For a time, I worked as a seafarer cadet electrician on a container ship. I have worked with cables, electric motors, and generators before—it was just in the middle of the ocean. So, needless to say I know cables, but SFP cables were new. With the help of my colleagues and the power of the Internet, I was on my way and cabling the data center in no time.

When we build a server, we check everything: the motherboard, processors, RAM, hard drives, and most importantly, OS compatibility. After learning those basics, I started to look at it like a big puzzle that I needed to solve.

Inside the Data Center: Strong Communication!

That wasn’t the only challenge. In order to do my job successfully and adhere to data center build procedures, I had to learn the best way to communicate with my colleagues.

In the data center, our team must relay messages precisely and provide all the details to ensure every step in the build-out process is done correctly. Jesse constantly reminds us what is important: communication, communication, communication. He always repeats it three times to emphasize it as a golden rule. To me, this is one sign of a successful leader. I’m glad Jesse has put a focus on communication because it is helping me learn what makes a good leader and SLayer.

Inside the Data Center: Job Satisfaction!

I am so happy to be working at SoftLayer. All the new challenges I’ve been faced with remind me of Nike’s slogan: Just Do It! And our young team is doing just that. We work six days a week for 14 hours a day. And for all of that time, I use my mental and physical strength to tackle my new job.

I’ve learned so much and am excited to expand the knowledge base I already have, so I can be a stronger asset to the SoftLayer team.

I consider myself a SLayer that is still-in-training because there is more to being a SLayer than just building racks. SLayers are the dedicated people that work at SoftLayer, and they’re my colleagues. As my training continues, I look forward to learning more and to continue gaining more skills. I don't want to get old without learning new things!

For all our readers in Asia below you will find the blog in Mandarin translation!

在我刚刚来到SoftLayer的时候,它正处于发展的初级阶段。那时候,IBM公司正投资了120万在世界各地建立数据中心,其中一个在香港。我非常荣幸我可以在这里工作!

在我加入香港数据中心——Go Live Team,成为一个服务器构建技术员以前,我经历了一个很长的面试过程。当时,我正在为一家跨国银行工作。然而,中国农历新年以后,我的内心告诉我,是时候要迎接新的挑战了。很多中国人在新年的时候寻求新的工作机会,他们相信,这会给他们带来好运和财富。

经过一番前期工作(还有采访和文书工作),我终于迎来了新的第一天。当我来到SoftLayer数据中心的时候,我穿过玻璃安全门,见到了SoftLayer香港站的经理——Jesse Arnold,我曾经采访时遇到的SoftLayer里Go Live Team的组长——Russell Mcguire,还有Shahzad,和我一样第一天开始工作的同事。

Shahzad和我都觉得非常的开心和兴奋能够加入这个组。在我们第一天工作的时候,我深深地吸了一口气,对自己说:你可以做到!这是一个进步的过程。我们从不会停止学习新的东西。学习新的东西是很有挑战性的,它包含了心理、身体和精神的力量。

在数据中心里面:建筑架!
当我们的团队开始构建建筑架和电缆的时候,它们都是新的东西。但不是完全不熟悉它们。以前,我的工作是在集装箱船的海员电工。那时候我的工作和电缆、发动机、发电机打交道,虽然它们都只是在海里,但是,我很确定我了解电缆,我很容易的上手了数据中心的工作。

当我们建立一个服务器的时候,我们得检查每一样东西:主板、处理器、内存、硬盘,还有最重要的,操作系统的兼容性。了解了这些基本的东西以后,我把它当做一个摆在面前的难题,认真地对待。

在数据中心里面:很强的沟通能力!
这并不是唯一的挑战。为了成功地做好我的工作,在建立数据中心的过程中,我必须学会用最佳方式和我的同事沟通。

在数据中心,我们的的团队必须精确地传送信息,并提供所有的细节,以确保扩建过程中每一个步骤正确地完成。Jesse不断地提醒我们,沟通交流是非常重要的。他强调沟通是黄金规则。对我来说,这是一个成功领导者的标志之一。我很高兴Jesse已经把重点放在沟通作为重点,因为它帮助我学习,什么是一名优秀的领导者。

在数据中心里面:工作满意度!
我很高兴可以在SoftLayer工作。面对所以新的挑战,我都度自己说:放手去做!我们年轻的团队都在努力。我们每周工作六天,每天14小时。那段时间内,我把我所有的精力都投入到了我的新工作中。

我从我的经历中学到了很多,增长了很多知识。所以我可以说,我给SoftLayer团队带来了价值。

我把自己当做一个让在学习进步的技术员,因为一个技术员不仅仅要会构架。精英是在SoftLayer执着工作的人们,他们是我的同事。由于我正处于训练学习阶段,我期待学习更多知识和技能。活到老,学到老!

- Ying

June 19, 2012

Proud to be a SLayer

Changing a career can be a challenge, especially when it feels like you are starting from scratch. I know that feeling well. I'd always been interested in networking, IT and cloud computing, but it wasn't until I joined SoftLayer that had an opportunity to start building a career on top of those interests. I know you might've already read a few introductions and SoftLayer culture posts in the past, but I wanted to share my experience in joining the hardware tech team to give my own unique perspective on what it was like becoming a SLayer.

Like Jonathan, I joined SoftLayer in San Jose (SJC01), and despite my interest in the technology SoftLayer manages for customers on a day-to-day basis, I didn't have many of the skills I'd need in the data center. That's where the training program came into play ... I can't tell you how valuable it was to learn how SoftLayer approaches cloud and data center operations. My previous jobs were in manufacturing, so I was accustomed to working with hardware and machines, so after a bit of a learning curve, I started to feel comfortable with the instruction and hands-on challenges that were put in front of me during the training program.

Once I was able to start applying what I learned in training, I started feeling "at home" when I got to the data center. I'm one of the many people responsible for supporting data center operations, and while I'm more of a "hands on" person, I don't forget the "big picture" of the significance of that responsibility. SoftLayer servers are the lifeblood of businesses around the world, and I owe it to those customers to provide the best service I can when it comes to managing their hardware. If that starts feeling daunting, I can look to my peers and ask questions about any problem, and I know I'll get a quick, helpful answer. I know SoftLayer is built on innovation and automation, but the unstated "education" piece is what has appealed to me the most as an employee.

One of my favorite resources to consult on a daily basis is the SoftLayer wiki — SLiki. If I ever forget any technical specifications or get confused about how to configure a specific type of hardware, I fire up my browser and hit the SLiki. If I'm not sure how to troubleshoot a given transaction or want to learn a little more about a topic like cloud computing or object storage, I can search the SLiki and get the answer in no time.

When friends and family have asked me what it's like to work at SoftLayer, I tell them that I'm constantly amazed and impressed impressed by my coworkers. It's hard to explain in a way that doesn't sound corny, but everyone I work with seems to enjoy supporting customers, interacting with other SLayers and making the SJC01 data center run like a top.

Pretty recently, I had my first Truck Day, and it made me love working for SoftLayer even more. It was pretty awe-inspiring to see SLayers from every department in our office joining the SBTs at the loading dock to unpack, sort and rack a huge shipment of SuperMicro servers. Everyone was sweaty, and I'm sure a few people were pretty sore the next day, but after all was said and done, we all felt like we'd accomplished something significant for our customers.

I'm proud to be a SLayer.

-Cuong

March 12, 2012

Quantifying Culture: From Intern to Full-Time SLayer

I've worked two months as a full-time employee at SoftLayer, but if you were to ask anyone here, they'd say I've been a SLayer for much longer. They're half right. I've been around, but not as a full-time employee. I started my SoftLayer journey as an intern in the summer before what was supposed to be my last full year of college. After that brief glimpse at what working at SoftLayer was like, I made the decision to condense my senior year into one semester (packed with 33 course credits and countless nights spent in the library) to get back to Dallas to sign on as an official SoftLayer employee. You might wonder why someone would give up her senior year of college to get into the working world ... To me it wasn't about "giving something up" as much as it was about "gaining an opportunity" to work for a company that fosters a culture I genuinely love! I literally could not wait to be back.

There are so many stories I could divulge about my time at SoftLayer — from company events with amusing endings to very thoughtful nicknames to a boss who has transformed into a friend and mentor. I'm not sure how many of these stories would be appreciated to a non-SLayer, and even if I tried to share them, I know they wouldn't do SoftLayer's culture justice. Honestly, I cannot make you understand what makes SoftLayer "SoftLayer." It's not just a name on a building ... It's the experience of getting a group of passionate people in a room to create and innovate. When you're surrounded by that atmosphere, you challenge yourself to be better ... And this blog is a testament to that atmosphere.

I would not consider myself a writer, and I was very hesitant to write this blog. This will be my first contribution to The Innerlayer, and writing the first words on a blank canvas is always intimidating. As I sat at my desk, wracking my brain for where to begin, it took all of five minutes for a fellow employee to recognize my struggles, pick up her laptop and come over to my desk with her work to help me turn my thoughts into words. I don't know of many other companies where it would be normal (or even allowed) to literally bring your work station to another person's desk to share time so generously.

An opportunity to join a culture like that is worth a lot more than a lighter course load and a longer senior year. And it's only one of many examples I can think of that happen on a regular basis that make working at SoftLayer so enjoyable.

Immediately after having finished this blog, I realized I wasn't stumped on the idea of writing a blog ... I was trying to decide how to adequately convey what SoftLayer's culture feels like to someone who doesn't get to experience it. I realize it's a matter of comprehending the incomprehensible. All I can tell you is that I don't regret giving up anything by accelerating my senior year. Truth be told, I am learning more here than any classroom, professor or project could have taught me.

Want to join us? There are more than forty available positions at SoftLayer in all of our worldwide locations. What are you waiting for?

-Katie (aka "KornFed" aka "Kansas" aka "Pippa")*

*I told you there were thoughtful nicknames.

October 9, 2011

Getting Started as a Server Build Technician

When I was interviewed for a job as Server Build Technician (SBT) in Dallas, I was a little concerned that I was getting in over my head. I let my potential manager know that I had very little experience with Linux but that I was willing to learn. I tried to show that I'd be a quick study, and the interview must have gone well because by the end of the day, I was offered the job. I was really excited to know that SoftLayer was willing to take give me an opportunity to finally start pursuing a career path in technology (which is what I was looking for out of school).

As it turns out, I was the only female SBT in SoftLayer's Dallas-area data centers, so I felt a good amount of pressure to prove myself and step up my game. Luckily, my training took away a lot of those nerves, and it was also comforting to see that no matter where I was working (data center or office), I was welcomed by my coworkers. It didn't hurt that I met some really cool people in the process, too. From day one, I realized that I'd been given an amazing opportunity to learn from some really smart folks who know their stuff when it comes to everything related to technology.

I have been here for around six months, and I can't believe how much tech knowledge I've absorbed. I wouldn't claim to be an expert in Linux or a MySQL guru (yet), but if my experience here is any indication, it won't be too long before I know everything there is to know about every technology living in our data centers. When I run into a problem or a question I don't have the answer for, I can rely on my coworkers to have the solutions and break them down into terms I can understand if they're overly complex.

Would I recommend this job to others? Most definitely! This has been one of the best jobs that I've ever had. I've been able to take what I learned in school and actually apply it to my daily work life while continuing my real-world on-the-job education. If you have a server in DAL02 and need someone to check out the hardware or add some RAM, I might be the one jumping to get your request fulfilled quickly.

I'm proof that SoftLayer invests in its employees, so if you're interested in an amazing job for a company who values you, I want you to be a coworker! We have positions in all departments available in Dallas, Houston, Singapore, Amsterdam, San Jose, Seattle and Washington, D.C. (and probably more location in the near future), so keep an eye on the SoftLayer Careers page for the perfect opportunity to join our team.

-Rochelle

September 25, 2011

Learning the Language of Hosting

It's been a little over a month since I started at SoftLayer ... And what a difference a month makes. In the course of applying for the Social Media Coordinator position I now hold, I was asked to write a few sample blogs. One was supposed to be about what SoftLayer does, and I answered it to the best of my abilities at the time. Looking back on my answer, I must admit I had no idea what I was getting into.

On the plus side, comparing what I know now with what I thought I knew then shows how much a person with zero background in hosting can learn in a short period of time. To give you an idea of where I came from, let's look at a few theoretical conversations:

Pre-SoftLayer

Friend: What does SoftLayer do?
Rachel: They are a hosting provider.
Friend: What is a hosting provider?
Rachel: It's sort of like an Internet landlord that rents data space to clients ... I think.

Present Day

Friend: What is it you do?
Rachel: I'm the Social Media Coordinator for SoftLayer Technologies.
Friend: What does SoftLayer do?
Rachel: SoftLayer is a hosting provider, however that is a generalization. We have data centers around the country and are expanding worldwide. The company offers dedicated, cloud and hybrid environments that allow us to handle companies outsourced IT. We are infrastructure experts.

That would be a little bit of a cookie cutter explanation, but it gives a lot more context to the business, and it would probably soar above the head of my non-technical inquisitive friend.

During my first week on the job, I visited one of SoftLayer's data centers ... And that "data center" term turned out to be a little tricky for me to remember. For some reason, I always wanted to call the data center a "database center." It got to the point where Kevin challenged me to a piggy bank deal.

SoftLayer is raising money for the American Heart Association, and everyone has a little piggy bank at their desk. One of the piggy banks essentially became a "swear jar" ... except not for swearing. Every time I said "database center," I had to put a dollar in the piggy bank. The deal was extended when I was trying to remember that 1 byte (big B) = 8 bits (little b):

AHA Piggy Bank

With money on the line, I'm happy to say that I haven't confused "database centers" or bits and bytes again ... And the piggy bank on the left-hand side of the picture above proves it!

Back to the DC (data center!) tour: I learned about how CRAC units are used to pull air underneath the floor and cool the "cold aisles" in the DC. I learned about the racks and how our network architecture provides private, public, and out–of–band management networks on the back end to customers in a way unique to SoftLayer. Most importantly, I learned the difference between managed, dedicated, cloud and hosting environments that incorporate all of those different kinds of hosting. This is a far cry from focusing on getting the terminology correct.

I'm still not an expert on all things SoftLayer, and I'm pretty sure I'll end up with my very own acronym dictionary, but I must admit that I absorbed more information in the past month than I thought possible. I have to thank my ninja sensei, Kevin, for taking the time to answer my questions. It felt like school again ... especially since there was a whiteboard in use!

Kevin, enjoy your empty piggy bank!

-Rachel

August 31, 2010

An excerpt from the Diary of a N00b

I must admit coming to work for SoftLayer made me a little nervous. I was hired as a receptionist and I assumed my computer skills, or lack thereof, would get me through just fine. I am not one of those people that you would consider computer savvy. Sure, I can use a computer to look up directions or make a PowerPoint but I knew I was rather limited for the times.

Before working here I thought the only kind of cookies out there were the kind you could bake with chocolate chips. I thought clouds only were up in the sky and was impressed when I heard someone mention they were customizable. When people said “I’m headed to the NOC” I just assumed they were going to knock on someone’s office door or maybe it was a hip new restaurant.

My first day I received calls about phishing and honeypots, I was beyond confused. I was sure Winnie the Pooh did not work here and these guys didn’t seem like the fishermen type. I decided it was time for me to get a little more current on the times. Everyone at SoftLayer has been accommodating and so generous with their time. I have been so impressed with everyone’s team work. I have learned so much in these first few weeks.

The SoftLayer Team has been so helpful showing me around the new building. It is absolutely stunning, it is a bit of a maze though. I’m afraid if I didn’t have someone walking me through, I might have to leave bread crumbs to find my way back.

In closing, I am glad to learn there are more cookie options but I still prefer the chocolate chip kind.

May 12, 2010

First Blog

So this is my first blog here at SoftLayer. I’ve worked here since February, but I am certainly very familiar with the industry. In a previous life I formed the sales department at one of our competitors and learned about the industry. Even though I worked at a competitor, I never heard anyone speak badly about SoftLayer, and in fact it was the ‘bar’ by which we measured ourselves.

Now that I work here, it is even more apparent how and why SoftLayer is the most respected name in the hosting industry. SoftLayer overall has the best reputation due to its people, innovations, dedication, and motivation of the entire team.

I work in the Customer Service department, and it is my responsibility to contact new clients to ensure that they are not running into any problems and to get some feedback on their experience thus far. I have heard virtually nothing but praise from any client I have spoken to (new or old) about their experiences here.

All in all, the only better thing than hosting at SoftLayer is to work at SoftLayer!

February 26, 2010

Hero or Failure?

You’re hired, welcome to the company! All you techies out there have heard that before. Then for the first couple of weeks you get the luxury of, “just take a look around the network and see what you see, make a note of what is good and what needs some work”. You make a few notes during your two week honeymoon period and then you hit the ground running. You make changes to a few of the server configs to speed them up, and you notice that there are a couple of hard drives in the server farm that are showing they are about to fail and you make a note to get that fixed. Everyone on the team hails your progress, smarts, and work ethic and thinks they have made the right choice. Even though the in-house gear is a little old you have made changes that made things faster and more redundant in your first month. Great Job! You are on your way to the Information Systems Hero title.

Everything is going along great at about the 8 month point. You have made a few key decisions along the way and have some of your gear outsourced now. All the ancient hardware onsite has been retired and liquidated and just a few core machines remain. You still have a large storage device and a tape robot onsite for your backups and you keep the tape library safely offsite. All is good in the department.

If you want to be the Hero skip to the word HERO / If you want to be a failure please skip 2 paragraphs to the word FAILURE

HERO

You have a free day or two in which nothing pressing needs to be addressed and you decide to look into the backup rotation and type. After spending a little time looking at it and not feeling comfortable you make the decision to create a secondary backup into the cloud as a test. After a little setup and tinkering you finish up and go on with your daily tasks.

A few months later your onsite storage device hard fails and there is massive data loss. A new system is delivered the same day and once the setup is complete the tapes are delivered and the restore process starts. Three hours into the restore a bad tape is encountered and again you are faced with massive data loss. The entire group is now in panic mode. It suddenly hits you that you setup a test backup offsite. What are the odds that it is still functioning and you will be able to get the data? With help from the entire department you get the network right and the data transfer starts. About one hour later the data is restored and your employees are happy not to mention your boss. You are now an IT hero.

FAILURE

A few months later your onsite storage device hard fails and there is massive data loss. A new system is delivered the same day and once the setup is complete the tapes are delivered and the restore process starts. Three hours into the restore a bad tape is encountered and again you are faced with massive data loss. The entire group is now in panic mode. After many attempts at trying to repair the damaged tape and having multiple experts look at the failed storage device. You and your team realize that 5 days of data will be lost and have to be recreated. Not a great day for your team. You are now an IT failure.

Moral of the story?

Use the tools the world provides to stay ahead of the curve. All it takes is one mistake to be a failure.

January 4, 2010

What's the Meaning of Family?

To a lot of people when you hear the word family you associate it with your mom, dad, kids, cousins etc. But, have you ever thought about your employer or co-workers being a part of your family? Let’s evaluate this question. You spend on average about 40 to 50 hours per week, which means an estimated amount of 1,920 to 2,400 hours per year, with co-workers. There will be moments where you laugh and cry together; there will also be moments when a long time co-worker will make a decision to advance their career in a new direction with a different company, and new additions will be made. Each family member has their responsibilities and role to play; the same way each department here at Softlayer does.

When I first came aboard in the Accounting department here at SoftLayer I was a little intimidated because I was clueless to the web hosting industry and I didn’t quite understand what SoftLayer actually did. However, I knew I was a whiz in accounting and therefore I could master this. To help shed some light on my job and its responsibilities, my boss decided to take me on a tour of one our data centers located in Dallas, TX. I was expecting to see a large room that stored a lot of servers and computer monitors; boy was I wrong and totally amazed. The SoftLayer Data center was so well organized and structured. There were no loose cables, rather elevated flooring and a state of the art floor cooling system to protect the servers from overheating. I was really impressed with the Hardware Engineers and CSA’s working diligently as a team to ensure all orders were processed 100% accurately. Being able to see the datacenter helped me understand more in depth what my job entailed.

Our Development department plays a huge role as well. They make sure new products are launched to keep us competitive in the web hosting industry. What we are advertising stands up to our name. A lot of behind the scenes testing takes place, which requires multiple departments to work together. Our Sales reps are very knowledgeable about our products and services. They ensure that our customers are happy with their purchases and that they stay happy. They go above and beyond to make sure you are renting a server that benefits your business needs.

Families like to have fun, and so does SoftLayer. We do company BBQ events and holiday parties as well as toy, food, and blood drives. They also make sure we get lots of SL gear, which we love! But most importantly we have monthly meetings with management where we can voice our opinion. After all, a happy employee is what keeps the company’s customer service level up. In conclusion, SoftLayer is a family oriented business and I do consider each of my co-workers a part of a family; because like a family, we all have to pitch in with a helping hand and help one another out.

December 30, 2009

The Newbie

Hi, I am the newbie and just wanted to start off saying thank you to everyone for making me feel so welcome. I have really enjoyed my first week here at SoftLayer. I can honestly say, this is the most exciting and fun job I have had. SoftLayer should win the Best Places to Work in DFW for 2010!

I think the best part about starting right before the holidays is getting to share the holiday cheer with all my new co-workers. As most people know, most companies get busy around the holidays which can cause tension and stress in the workplace. Coming into SoftLayer one of the major things I liked is that no matter how busy we are there is still a sense of peace and calmness; this is a great asset in a workplace.

As most would know, when you first start out at a new company you need to do research to learn about your new company and the industry it is involved in. These first few days I have been reading a bunch of different articles and websites to learn more about what SoftLayer does and to get a feel for the industry. I have to say I am still rather confused. There are so many technical terms and Wikipedia doesn’t pick up on all of them (ha ha). The more research I do, though, the more I pick up on certain things. I still have more to learn but I am eager and excited to learn more about SoftLayer and the industry. Now off to do more research!

Subscribe to new-job