Posts Tagged 'Openstack'

August 31, 2015

Data Ingestion and Access Using Object Storage

The massive growth in unstructured data (documents, images, videos, and so on) is one of the greatest problems facing today’s IT personnel. The challenge is storing all the data so that it and its storage solution can grow exponentially. Object storage is an ideal, cost-effective, scale-out solution for storing extensive amounts of unstructured data.

SoftLayer offers object storage based on the OpenStack Swift platform. Object storage provides a fully distributed, scalable, API-accessible storage platform that can be integrated directly into applications. It can be used for storing static data, such as virtual machine (VM) images, photos, emails, and so on. Click here for more information on object storage.

There are two important use cases when working with object storage: data ingestion and data access.

Data ingestion use case
A large medical research company needs to upload a large amount of data into their SoftLayer compute instance. The requirement is for a multi-hundred terabyte image repository that contains hundreds of millions of images. Researchers will then upload code to run on bare metal servers with GPUs to process the images in the repository. The images range from 512KB CT images to 30MB to 50 MB mammograms and are logically grouped into 12 million “studies.” The client wants to onboard the data as quickly as possible.

Recommendations

  • Evenly distribute the objects into approximately 1,000 containers for the initial upload. For the amount of objects the client needs to store, our tests have shown that having a much larger number of containers, or too few objects per container, would incur significant performance penalties. The proposed 1,000 containers allow for a good balance for parallelism in object creation and keeps the container sizes manageable.
  • Concurrently add new objects to all containers using 400 worker threads for small objects (e.g., 512KB CT images) and 40 worker threads for large objects (e.g., 30KB to 50KB mammograms). The ideal number of worker threads is dependent on the workload size. Using a minimal amount of threads results in better response but lower throughput. Using significantly more threads may lower both latency and throughput because the threads start competing for resources.

Data access use case
A large technology company has a mix of GET, PUT, and DELETE operations for which it needs object storage capable of holding billions of small objects (15KB or less). They also want consistent latencies for their operation mix (GET 54%, PUT 33%, and DELETE 13%), which requires optimal tuning for consistent performance. The client’s benchmarking calls for 1,400 operations per second.

Recommendations

  • Use multiple containers (at least 40) to improve the latency for PUT and DELETE objects. As long as the objects are distributed over at least 40 containers with a sufficient number of worker threads, the average latencies for PUT and DELETE objects was well below 100ms in our tests. There may be occasional latency spikes, which are not surprising on shared storage systems, but overall, the latencies should be relatively consistent.
    • Object reads (GETs) do not access containers. The read latency for a GET is very fast—less than 20ms on average for small objects.
  • Use multiple containers if very high throughput is needed. In our tests, we could drive more than 6,000 transactions per second on the production cluster with at least 40 containers. A shared production cluster has higher latencies than a dedicated environment, so more worker threads would be needed to achieve high throughput.

-Debra Sena, IBM Channel Enablement Writer MSCSO

Categories: 
June 29, 2015

Opening Up the Cloud

This guest blog post is written by Alexia Emmanoulopoulou, marketing manager at Canonical.

With OpenStack, cloud computing becomes easily accessible to everyone. It tears down financial barriers to cloud deployments and tackles the fear of lock-in. One of the main benefits of OpenStack is the fact that it is open source and supported by a wide ecosystem, with contributions from more than 200 companies, including Canonical and IBM. Users can change service providers and hardware at any time, and compared to other clouds using virtualization technology, OpenStack can double server utilization to as much as 85 percent. This means that an OpenStack cloud is economical and delivers more flexibility, scalability, and agility to businesses. The challenge however lies in recruiting and retaining OpenStack experts, who are in high demand, making it hard for companies to deploy OpenStack on time and on budget. But BootStack, Canonical’s managed cloud product solved that problem by offering all the benefits of a private cloud without any of the pain of day-to-day infrastructure management.

Addressing the Challenge of Finding OpenStack Experts

Resourcing an OpenStack six-strong team to work 24x7 would cost between $900,000 and $1.5 million and can take months of headhunting. Thus the savings that OpenStack should bring companies are eroded so Canonical created BootStack, short for Build, Operate, and Optionally Transfer. It’s a new service for setting up and operating an OpenStack cloud, in both on-premises and hosted environments, and it gives users the option of taking over the management of your cloud in the future.

After working with each customer to define their requirements and specify the right cloud infrastructure for their business, Canonical’s experienced engineering and support team builds and manages the entire cloud infrastructure of the customer, including Ubuntu OpenStack, the underlying hypervisor, and deployment onto hosted or on-premises hardware. As a result, users get all the benefits of a private cloud without any of the pain of day-to-day infrastructure management. For added protection, BootStack is backed by a clear SLA that covers cloud availability at the user’s desired scale as well as uptime and responsiveness metrics.

Choosing Between On-premises and Hosted Cloud

Some companies prefer to host on-premises because they feel more secure knowing their cloud is running on their own site. However, when things go wrong, some companies find they don’t have the expertise on-hand to quickly recover. Furthermore, on-site hosting is at least three times as expensive as it is to outsource to a hosting specialist.

With the hosted option for BootStack, your OpenStack cloud will be hosted on Ubuntu-certified hardware in SoftLayer data centers. SoftLayer provides customizable bare metal and virtual servers run on the highest performing cloud infrastructure available. Users can seamlessly move data between servers at no cost and benefit from secure, fast, and low-latency communications between data centers. 24x7 expert staff in each data center can troubleshoot any rare issues that can’t be directly resolved through their self-service management portal. Canonical and SoftLayer also take care of patches and upgrades to both the operating system and OpenStack, hardware and software failure prevention and fix, proactive health monitoring of the cloud and hardware, and resolution of any other problems.

No Lock-In and Predictable Cost

The two features that set BootStack apart from other managed cloud products are the predictable cost structure and the lack of lock-in. With BootStack, users can access every tool and every machine, any time. A company can choose to take over the management of its cloud at any time, at which point it will receive training and support from Canonical to ensure a smooth transition. BootStack customers can then choose to either bring their cloud in-house or continue hosting with SoftLayer.

In terms of costs, BootStack cloud is priced at $15 per day per server, plus the cost of the hosting. SoftLayer offers a number of bare metal servers that exceed the OpenStack recommended configuration, starting at $699 per month. You pay as you go, and can scale as your business needs change.

All-in-all, it’s a flexible managed cloud at a predictable cost with expert staff to manage it until you’re ready to take over!

For more information about BootStack, SoftLayer, and OpenStack, download our free white paper: The Easiest Way to Build and Manage an OpenStack Cloud.

-Alexia

March 18, 2015

SoftLayer, Bluemix and OpenStack: A Powerful Combination

Building and deploying applications on SoftLayer with Bluemix, IBM’s Platform as a Service (PaaS), just got a whole lot more powerful. At IBM’s Interconnect, we announced a beta service for deploying OpenStack-based virtual servers within Bluemix. Obviously, the new service is exciting because it brings together the scalable, secure, high-performance infrastructure from SoftLayer with the open, standards-based cloud management platform of OpenStack. But making the new service available via Bluemix presents a particularly unique set of opportunities.

Now Bluemix developers can deploy OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer or their own private OpenStack cloud in a consistent, developer-friendly manner. Without changing your code, your configuration, or your deployment method, you can launch your application to a local OpenStack cloud on your premises, a private OpenStack cloud you have deployed on SoftLayer bare metal servers, or to SoftLayer virtual servers within Bluemix. For instance, you could instantly fire up a few OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer to test out your new application. After you have impressed your clients and fully tested everything, you could deploy that application to a local OpenStack cloud in your own data center ̶all from within Bluemix. With Bluemix providing the ability to deploy applications across cloud deployment models, developers can create an infrastructure configuration once and deploy consistently, regardless of the stage of their application development life cycle.

OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer enable you to manage all of your virtual servers through standard OpenStack APIs and user interfaces, and leverage the tooling, knowledge and process you or your organization have already built out. So the choice is yours: you may fully manage your virtual servers directly from within the Bluemix user interface or choose standard OpenStack interface options such as the Horizon management portal, the OpenStack API or the OpenStack command line interface. For clients who are looking for enterprise-class infrastructure as a service but also wish to avoid getting locked in a vendor’s proprietary interface, our new OpenStack standard access provides clients a new choice.

Providing OpenStack-based virtual servers is just one more (albeit major) step toward our goal of providing even more OpenStack integration with SoftLayer services. For clients looking for enterprise-class Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) available globally and accessible via standard OpenStack interfaces, OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer provide just what they are looking for.

The beta is open now for you to test deploying and running servers on the new SoftLayer OpenStack public cloud service through Bluemix. You can sign up for a Bluemix 30-day free trial.

- @marcalanjones

March 6, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1 No. 7: the IBM InterConnect Edition

Last week, an estimated 21,000 IBMers, SLayers, customers and partners from around the world flooded Las Vegas, Nev. to attend the first-ever IBM InterConnect. This new conference combined three popular IBM conferences (Impact, Innovate and Pulse) into a single, premier cloud and mobile techno-topia.

What our engineers and developers did in Las Vegas after conference hours might have stayed in Las Vegas, but IBM’s InterConnect hits and announcements didn’t. Here’s a recap:

Speed to Market Wins the Cloud Computing Race
Everyone likes to go fast, and the new senior vice president for IBM Cloud, Robert LeBlanc, likes to go super-fast. “What I’m focusing on is speed,” LeBlanc says.

In this blink-and-the-market-changes world, time-to-market determines the winners and losers in cloud computing. Part of LeBlanc’s strategy is opening new SoftLayer datacenters. If you haven’t heard the news, SoftLayer will be launching Sydney and Montreal data centers in the next 30 days — with more coming soon. Stay tuned for more locations.

Read more on how LeBlanc plans to win the cloud business race.

Cloudy skies on the horizon—that’s a good thing!
Our CEO, Ginni Rometty, announced a $4 billion investment on cloud services (shared with the data analytics and mobile businesses). She’s hoping that the investment will spur $40 billion a year in revenue come 2018.

Signs of the investment could be seen as execs at InterConnect announced new hybrid services coming in 2015, including enterprise containers. [What’s a container? Read our blog post.]

In fact, hybrid was a big theme at InterConnect. “We are going to make all those clouds act like one,” says Angel Diaz, vice president of IBM cloud technologies. IBM cloud (powered by SoftLayer) will be a one-stop shop: a cloud superstore with a smorgasbord of aaS offerings.

It looks like it’ll be an exciting ride for IBM over the next couple of years. Make sure to keep up with the headlines for more announcements in the coming months.

-JRL

Categories: 
February 6, 2014

Building a Bridge to the OpenStack API

OpenStack is experiencing explosive growth in the cloud market. With more than 200 companies contributing code to the source and new installations coming online every day, OpenStack is pushing hard to become a global standard for cloud computing. Dozens of useful tools and software products have been developed using the OpenStack API, so a growing community of administrators, developers and IT organizations have access to easy-to-use, powerful cloud resources. This kind of OpenStack integration is great for users on a full OpenStack cloud, but it introduces a challenge to providers and users on other cloud platforms: Should we consider deploying or moving to an OpenStack environment to take advantage of these tools?

If a cloud provider spends years developing a unique platform with a proprietary API, implementing native support for the OpenStack API or deploying a full OpenStack solution may be cost prohibitive, even with significant customer and market demand. The provider can either bite the bullet to implement OpenStack compatibility, hope that a third party library like libclouds or fog is updated to support its API, or choose to go it alone and develop an ecosystem of products around its own API.

Introducing Jumpgate

When we were faced with this situation at SoftLayer, we chose a fourth option. We wanted to make the process of creating an OpenStack-compatible API simpler and more modular. That's where Jumpgate was born. Jumpgate is a middleware that acts as a compatibility layer between the OpenStack API and a provider's proprietary API. Externally, it exposes endpoints that adhere to OpenStack's published and accepted API specification, which it then translates into the provider's API using a series of drivers. Think of it as a mechanism to enable passing from one realm/space into another — like the jumpgates featured in science fiction works.

Connection

How Jumpgate Works
Let's take a look at a high-level example: When you want to create a new virtual instance on OpenStack, you might use the Horizon dashboard or the Nova command line client. When you issue the request, the tool first makes a REST call to a Keystone endpoint for authentication, which returns an authorization token. The client then makes another REST call to a Nova endpoint, which manages the computing instances, to create the actual virtual instance. Nova may then make calls to other tools within the cluster for networking (Quantum), image information (Glance), block storage (Cinder), or more. In addition, your client may also send requests directly to some of these endpoints to query for status updates, information about available resources, and so on.

With Jumpgate, your tool first hits the Jumpgate middleware, which exposes a Keystone endpoint. Jumpgate takes the request, breaks it apart into its relevant pieces, then loads up your provider's appropriate API driver. Next, Jumpgate reformats your request into a form that the driver supports and sends it to the provider's API endpoint. Once the response comes back, Jumpgate again uses the driver to break apart the proprietary API response, reformats it into an OpenStack compatible JSON payload, and sends it back to your client. The result is that you interact with an OpenStack-compatible API, and your cloud provider processes those interactions on their own backend infrastructure.

Internally, Jumpgate is a lightweight middleware built in Python using the Falcon Framework. It provides endpoints for nearly every documented OpenStack API call and allows drivers to attach handlers to these endpoints. This modular approach allows providers to implement only the endpoints that are of the highest importance, rolling out OpenStack API compatibility in stages rather than in one monumental effort. Since it sits alongside the provider's existing API, Jumpgate provides a new API interface without risking the stability already provided by the existing API. It's a value-add service that increases customer satisfaction without a huge increase in cost. Once full implementations is finished, a provider with a proprietary cloud platform can benefit from and offer all the tools that are developed to work with the OpenStack API.

Jumpgate allows providers to test the proper OpenStack compatibility of their drivers by leveraging the OpenStack Tempest test suite. With these tests, developers run the full suite of calls used by OpenStack itself, highlighting edge cases or gaps in functionality. We've even included a helper script that allows Tempest to only run a subset of tests rather than the entire suite to assist with a staged rollout.

Current Development
Jumpgate is currently in an early alpha stage. We've built the compatibility framework itself and started on the SoftLayer drivers as a reference. So far, we've implemented key endpoints within Nova (computing instances), Keystone (identification and authorization), and Glance (image management) to get most of the basic functionality within Horizon (the web dashboard) working. We've heard that several groups outside SoftLayer are successfully using Jumpgate to drive products like Trove and Heat directly on SoftLayer, which is exciting and shows that we're well beyond the "proof of concept" stage. That being said, there's still a lot of work to be done.

We chose to develop Jumpgate in the open with a tool set that would be familiar to developers working with OpenStack. We're excited to debut this project for the broader OpenStack community, and we're accepting pull requests if you're interested in contributing. Making more clouds compatible with the OpenStack API is important and shouldn’t be an individual undertaking. If you're interested in learning more or contributing, head over to our in-flight project page on GitHub: SoftLayer Jumpgate. There, you'll find everything you need to get started along with the updates to our repository. We encourage everyone to contribute code or drivers ... or even just open issues with feature requests. The more community involvement we get, the better.

-Nathan

Categories: 
January 31, 2014

Simplified OpenStack Deployment on SoftLayer

"What is SoftLayer doing with OpenStack?" I can't even begin to count the number of times I've been asked that question over the last few years. In response, I'll usually explain how we've built our object storage platform on top of OpenStack Swift, or I'll give a few examples of how our customers have used SoftLayer infrastructure to build and scale their own OpenStack environments. Our virtual and bare metal cloud servers provide a powerful and flexible foundation for any OpenStack deployment, and our unique three-tiered network integrates perfectly with OpenStack's Compute and Network node architecture, so it's high time we make it easier to build an OpenStack environment on SoftLayer infrastructure.

To streamline and simplify OpenStack deployment for the open source community, we've published Opscode Chef recipes for both OpenStack Grizzly and OpenStack Havana on GitHub: SoftLayer Chef-Openstack. With Chef and SoftLayer, your own OpenStack cloud is a cookbook away. These recipes were designed with the needs of growth and scalability in mind. Let's take a deeper look into what exactly that means.

OpenStack has adopted a three-node design whereby a controller, compute, and network node make up its architecture:

OpenStack Architecture on SoftLayer

Looking more closely at any one node reveal the services it provides. Scaling the infrastructure beyond a few dozen nodes, using this model, could create bottlenecks in services such as your block store, OpenStack Cinder, and image store, OpenStack Glance, since they are traditionally located on the controller node. Infrastructure requirements change from service to service as well. For example OpenStack Neutron, the networking service, does not need much disk I/O while the Cinder storage service might heavily rely on a node's hard disk. Our cookbook allows you to choose how and where to deploy the services, and it even lets you break apart the MySQL backend to further improve platform performance.

Quick Start: Local Demo Environment

To make it easy to get started, we've created a rapid prototype and sandbox script for use with Vagrant and Virtual Box. With Vagrant, you can easily spin up a demo environment of Chef Server and OpenStack in about 15 minutes on moderately good laptops or desktops. Check it out here. This demo environment is an all-in-one installation of our Chef OpenStack deployment. It also installs a basic Chef server as a sandbox to help you see how the SoftLayer recipes were deployed.

Creating a Custom OpenStack Deployment

The thee-node OpenStack model does well in small scale and meets the needs of many consumers; however, control and customizability are the tenants for the design of the SoftLayer OpenStack Chef cookbook. In our model, you have full control over the configuration and location of eleven different components in your deployed environment:

Our Chef recipes will take care of populating the configuration files with the necessary information so you won't have to. When deploying, you merely add the role for the matching service to a hardware or virtual server node, and Chef will deploy the service to it with all the configuration done automatically, including adding multiple Neutron, Nova, and Cinder nodes. This approach allows you to tailor the needs of each service to the hardware it will be deployed to--you might put your Neutron hardware node on a server with 10-gigabit network interfaces and configure your Cinder hardware node with RAID 1+0 15k SAS drives.

OpenStack is a fast growing project for the implementation of IaaS in public and private clouds, but its deployment and configuration can be overwhelming. We created this cookbook to make the process of deploying a full OpenStack environment on SoftLayer quick and straightforward. With the simple configuration of eleven Chef roles, your OpenStack cloud can be deployed onto as little as one node and scaled up to many as hundreds (or thousands).

To follow this project, visit SoftLayer on GitHub. Check out some of our other projects on GitHub, and let us know if you need any help or want to contribute.

-@marcalanjones

February 15, 2012

SoftLayer + OpenStack Swift = SoftLayer Object Storage

Since our inception in 2005, SoftLayer's goal has been to provide an array of on-demand data center and hosting services that combine exceptional access, control, scalability and security with unparalleled network robustness and ease of use ... That's why we're so excited to unveil SoftLayer Object Storage to our customers.

Based on OpenStack Object Storage (codenamed Swift) — open-source software that allows the creation of redundant, scalable object storage on clusters of standardized servers — SoftLayer Object Storage provides customers with new opportunities to leverage cost-effective cloud-based storage and to simultaneously realize significant capex-related cost savings.

OpenStack has been phenomenally successful thanks to a global software community comprised of developers and other technologists that has built and tweaked a standards-based, massively scalable open-source platform for public and private cloud computing. The simple goal of the OpenStack project is to deliver code that enables any organization to create and offer feature-rich cloud computing services from industry-standard hardware. The overarching OpenStack technology consists of several interrelated project components: One for compute, one for an image service, one for object storage, and a few more projects in development.

SoftLayer Object Storage
Like the OpenStack Swift system on which it is based, SoftLayer Object Storage is not a file system or real-time data-storage system, rather it's a long-term storage system for a more permanent type of static data that can be retrieved, leveraged and updated when necessary. Typical applications for this type of storage can involve virtual machine images, photo storage, email storage and backup archiving.

One of the primary benefits of Object Storage is the role that it can play in automating and streamlining data storage in cloud computing environments. SoftLayer Object Storage offers rich metadata features and search capability that can be leveraged to automate the way unstructured data gets accessed. In this way, SoftLayer Object Storage will provide organizations with new capabilities for improving overall data management and storage efficiency.

File Storage v. Object Storage
To better understand the difference between file storage and object storage, let's look at how file storage and object storage differ when it comes to metadata and search for a simple photo image. When a digital camera or camera-enabled phone snaps a photo, it embeds a series of metadata values in the image. If you save the image in a standard image file format, you can search for it by standard file properties like name, date and size. If you save the same image with additional metadata as an object, you can set object metadata values for the image (after reading them from the image file). This detail provides granular search capability based on the metadata keys and values, in addition to the standard object properties. Here is a sample comparison of an image's metadata value in both systems:

File Metadata Object Metadata
Name:img01.jpg Name:img01.jpg
Date: 2012-02-13 Date:2012-02-13
Size:1.2MB Size:1.2MB
Manufacturer:CASIO
Model:QV-4000
x-Resolution:72.00
y-Resolution:72.00
PixelXDimension:2240
PixelYDimension:1680
FNumber:f/4.0
Exposure Time:1/659 sec.

Using the rich metadata and search capability enabled by object storage, you would be able to search for all images with a dimension of 2240x1680 or a resolution of 72x72 in a quick/automated fashion. The object storage system "understands" more about what is being stored because it is able to differentiate files based on characteristics that you define.

What Makes SoftLayer Object Storage Different?
SoftLayer Object Storage features several unique features and ways for SoftLayer customers to upload, access and manage data:

  • Search — Quickly access information through user-defined metadata key-value pairs, file name or unique identifier
  • CDN — Serve your content globally over our high-performance content delivery network
  • Private Network — Free, secure private network traffic between all data centers and storage cluster nodes
  • API — Access to a full-feature OpenStack-compatible API with additional support for CDN and search integration
  • Portal — Web application integrated into the SoftLayer portal
  • Mobile — iPhone and Android mobile apps, with Windows Phone app coming soon
  • Language Bindings — Feature-complete bindings for Java, PHP, Python and Ruby*

*Language bindings, documentation, and guides are available on SLDN.

We think SoftLayer Object Storage will be attractive to a broad range of current and prospective customers, from web-centric businesses dependent on file sharing and content distribution to legal/medical/financial-services companies which possess large volumes of data that must be stored securely while remaining readily accessible.

SoftLayer Object Storage significantly extends our cloud-services portfolio while substantially enriching the storage capabilities that we bring to our customers. What are you waiting for? Go order yourself some object storage @ $0.12/GB!

-Marc

February 14, 2012

Open Source, OpenStack and SoftLayer

The open-source model has significantly revolutionized not only the IT industry but the business world as well. In fact, it was one of the key "flatteners" Thomas Friedman covered in his tour de force on globalization — The World is Flat. The trend toward collaborating on online projects — including open-source software, blogs, and Wikipedia — remains one of "the most disruptive forces of all."

The success of open-source projects like Linux, Ruby on Rails, and Android reveals the strength and diversity of having developers around the world contributing and providing feedback on code. The community becomes more than the sum of its parts, driving innovation and constant improvement. The case has been made for open source in and of itself, but a debate still rages over the developing case for businesses contributing to open source. Why would a business dedicate resources to the development of something it can't sell?

The answer is simple and straightforward: Contributing to open source fosters a community that can inspire, create and fuel the innovation a business needs to keep providing its customers with even better products. It makes sense ... Having hundreds of developers with different skills and perspectives working on a project can push that project further faster. The end result is a product that benefits the open-source community and the business world. The destiny of the community or the product cannot be defined by a single vendor or business; it's the democratization of technology.

Open-Source Cloud Platforms
Today, there are several open-source cloud platforms vying for industry dominance. SoftLayer has always been a big proponent and supporter of open source, and we've been involved with the OpenStack project from the beginning. In fact, we just announced SoftLayer Object Storage, an offering based on OpenStack Object Storage (code-named Swift). We'll provide code and support for Swift in hopes that it continues to grow and improve. The basic idea behind Swift Object Storage is to create redundant, scalable object storage using clusters of standardized servers to store petabytes of accessible data. I could go on and on about object storage, but I know Marc Jones has a blog specifically about SoftLayer Object Storage being published tomorrow, and I don't want to steal too much of his thunder.

We have to acknowledge and embrace the heterogeneous nature of IT industry. Just as you might use multiple operating systems and hypervisors, we're plan on working with a variety of open-source cloud platforms. Right now, we're looking into supporting initiatives like Eucalyptus, and we have our ear to the street to listen to what our customers are asking for. Our overarching goal is to provide our customers with much-needed technologies that are advancing the hosting industry, and one of the best ways to get to that end is to serve the needs of the open-source community.

As I write this blog post, I can't help but think of it in terms of a the Lord of Rings reference: "One ring to rule them all." The idea that "one ring" is all we need to focus on as a hosting provider just doesn't work when it comes to the open-source community ... It all comes down to enabling choice and flexibility. We'll keep investing in innovation wherever we can, and we'll let the market decide which ring will rule where.

What open-source projects are you working on now? How can SoftLayer get involved?

-Matt

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