Posts Tagged 'Products'

February 15, 2013

Cedexis: SoftLayer "Master Model Builder"

Think of the many components of our cloud infrastrucutre as analogous to LEGO bricks. If our overarching vision is to help customers "Build the Future," then our products are "building blocks" that can be purposed and repurposed to create scalable, high-performance architecture. Like LEGO bricks, each of our components is compatible with every other component in our catalog, so our customers are essentially showing off their Master Model Builder skills as they incorporate unique combinations of infrastructure and API functionality into their own product offerings. Cedexis has proven to be one of those SoftLayer "Master Model Builders."

As you might remember from their Technology Partner Marketplace feature, Cedexis offers a content and application delivery system that helps users balance traffic based on availability, performance and cost. They've recently posted a blog about how they integrated the SoftLayer API into their system to detect an unresponsive server (disabled network interface), divert traffic at the DNS routing level and return it as soon as the server became available again (re-enabled the network interface) ... all through the automation of their Openmix service:

They've taken the building blocks of SoftLayer infrastructure and API connectivity to create a feature-rich platform that improves the uptime and performance for sites and applications using Openmix. Beyond the traffic shaping around unreachable servers, Cedexis also incorporated the ability to move traffic between servers based on the amount of bandwidth you have remaining in a given month or based on the response times it sees between servers in different data centers. You can even make load balancing decisions based on SoftLayer's server management data with Fusion — one of their newest products.

The tools and access Cedexis uses to power these Openmix features are available to all of our customers via the SoftLayer API, and if you've ever wondered how to combine our blocks into your environment in unique, dynamic and useful ways, Cedexis gives a perfect example. In the Product Development group, we love to see these kinds of implementations, so if you're using SoftLayer in an innovative way, don't keep it a secret!

-Bryce

December 18, 2012

2012 at SoftLayer: A Year-End Review

It's already December 18, so you've probably read a few dozen "Best of 2012" and "Looking Back on 2012" articles around the web by now. I hope that you indulge me as I add one more tally to that list ... I can't suppress the urge to take a nostalgic look back on all of SoftLayer's successes this year.

As Director of Communications, the easiest milestones for me to use as I look back are our product announcements and press releases, so I'll use those as landmarks to help tell the story of SoftLayer in 2012. Instead of listing those points chronologically, it might make a little more sense to categorize them topically so you can see the bigger picture of what's happening at the company when it comes to product innovation, growth, the startup community and industry recognition.

Driving Product Innovation

When your company motto is "Innovate or Die," there's a lot of pressure to stay on the bleeding edge of technology. In this calendar year alone, we launched some pretty amazing products and capabilities that have the potential of reshaping the competitive landscape:

  • Flex Images – In February, we announced Flex Images — an amazing tool that blurs the line between "cloud" and "dedicated." Users can easily replicate servers and move them between physical and virtual platforms to quickly meet their changing requirements. None of our competitors can match that level of flexibility.
  • High Performance Computing – In April, we launched high-performance computing (HPC) options powered by NVIDIA Tesla GPUS to provide an on-demand, consumption-based platform for users with the most compute-intensive environments.
  • SoftLayer Private Clouds – In June, we unveiled Private Clouds based on CloudStack and Citrix CloudPlatform. A Private Cloud is a an optimized environment that enables quick provisioning of cloud instances on dedicated infrastructure, and because we've automated the provisioning and expansion of the Private Cloud architecture, customers can order and configure full private cloud deployments on demand.
  • Big Data: MongoDB – Our most recent product release, an optimized MongoDB environment, was the amazing result of a strategic partnership with the team at 10gen. This flexible pay-as-you-go solution simplifies the big data buying process and enables organizations to swiftly deploy highly scalable and available production-grade systems. Big data developers don't have to settle for lower-performance virtualized platforms, and they don't have to hassle with building, configuring and tweaking their own dedicated environments (since we did all the work for them).

Expanding in Key Vertical Markets

Beyond the pure "product innovation" milestones we've hit this year, we've also seen a few key vertical markets do their own innovating on our platform. With a paintbrush and a little creativity, Pablo Picasso popularized Cubism, so when our creative customers are provided with a truly scalable platform that delivers unparalleled performance and control across both physical and virtual devices, they do their own world changing. Several top online gaming providers and cutting-edge tech companies chose SoftLayer to do their "painting" this year, and their stories have been pretty amazing:

  • Broken Bulb Studios - This social gaming developer uses SoftLayer's public and private cloud infrastructure with RightScale cloud management to easily deploy, automate and manage its rapidly expanding computing workloads across the globe.
  • KIXEYE, Storm8, and East Side Games - These online gaming companies rely on SoftLayer to provide a platform of dedicated, virtualized and managed servers from which they can develop, test, launch and run their latest games.
  • AppFirst, Cloudant and Struq - These hot tech companies moved to SoftLayer to achieve the scalability, performance and the time-to-market they need to continue meeting global market demand for their services.
  • Huge Wins in Europe, Middle East and Africa - Companies like Binweevils, Boxed Ice, Crazymist, Exit Games, Ganymede, Hotwire Financial, Mangrove, Multiplay, Peak Games and Zamzar are just some of organizations that choose SoftLayer to deliver the cloud infrastructure for their killer applications and games.

Supporting the Startup Community

2012 was the first full year of activity for the Catalyst Startup Program. Catalyst is geared toward furthering innovation by investing time and hosting resources in helping entrepreneurs build their businesses, and as an extension of that program, we also supported several high-profile incubators, accelerators and startup-related events this year:

Earning Industry Recognition

All of this innovation and effort didn't go unnoticed in 2012. SoftLayer's growth and accomplishments throughout the year resulted in some high-profile recognition:

  • SoftLayer won the Red Herring "Top 100 North America Tech Award," a mark of distinction for identifying promising new companies and entrepreneurs. With this award, we join the ranks of past recipients like Facebook, Twitter and Google.
  • SoftLayer was listed in the Top 10 on Business Insider's Digital 100 list of 2012's Most Valuable Private Tech Companies in the world, alongside Twitter, Square and Dropbox.

Beyond that "official" recognition of what we're doing to shake up the market, the best barometer for our success is our customer base. According to an amazing hosting infographic from HostCabi.net, we're the most popular hosting provider among the 100,000 most visited websites in the world. We easily beat out all other service providers — almost doubling the number of sites hosted by the second-place competitor — and we're not slowing down. We're using the momentum we've continued building in 2012 to propel us into 2013, and we encourage you to watch this space for even more activity next year.

-Andre

Categories: 
February 14, 2012

Open Source, OpenStack and SoftLayer

The open-source model has significantly revolutionized not only the IT industry but the business world as well. In fact, it was one of the key "flatteners" Thomas Friedman covered in his tour de force on globalization — The World is Flat. The trend toward collaborating on online projects — including open-source software, blogs, and Wikipedia — remains one of "the most disruptive forces of all."

The success of open-source projects like Linux, Ruby on Rails, and Android reveals the strength and diversity of having developers around the world contributing and providing feedback on code. The community becomes more than the sum of its parts, driving innovation and constant improvement. The case has been made for open source in and of itself, but a debate still rages over the developing case for businesses contributing to open source. Why would a business dedicate resources to the development of something it can't sell?

The answer is simple and straightforward: Contributing to open source fosters a community that can inspire, create and fuel the innovation a business needs to keep providing its customers with even better products. It makes sense ... Having hundreds of developers with different skills and perspectives working on a project can push that project further faster. The end result is a product that benefits the open-source community and the business world. The destiny of the community or the product cannot be defined by a single vendor or business; it's the democratization of technology.

Open-Source Cloud Platforms
Today, there are several open-source cloud platforms vying for industry dominance. SoftLayer has always been a big proponent and supporter of open source, and we've been involved with the OpenStack project from the beginning. In fact, we just announced SoftLayer Object Storage, an offering based on OpenStack Object Storage (code-named Swift). We'll provide code and support for Swift in hopes that it continues to grow and improve. The basic idea behind Swift Object Storage is to create redundant, scalable object storage using clusters of standardized servers to store petabytes of accessible data. I could go on and on about object storage, but I know Marc Jones has a blog specifically about SoftLayer Object Storage being published tomorrow, and I don't want to steal too much of his thunder.

We have to acknowledge and embrace the heterogeneous nature of IT industry. Just as you might use multiple operating systems and hypervisors, we're plan on working with a variety of open-source cloud platforms. Right now, we're looking into supporting initiatives like Eucalyptus, and we have our ear to the street to listen to what our customers are asking for. Our overarching goal is to provide our customers with much-needed technologies that are advancing the hosting industry, and one of the best ways to get to that end is to serve the needs of the open-source community.

As I write this blog post, I can't help but think of it in terms of a the Lord of Rings reference: "One ring to rule them all." The idea that "one ring" is all we need to focus on as a hosting provider just doesn't work when it comes to the open-source community ... It all comes down to enabling choice and flexibility. We'll keep investing in innovation wherever we can, and we'll let the market decide which ring will rule where.

What open-source projects are you working on now? How can SoftLayer get involved?

-Matt

January 27, 2012

Deciphering SoftLayer Acronyms

As a bit of an introduction, I began my career as a GSP and hosted LAMP sites with WHM for SMBs ... NBD. If you're not fluent in "Tech Geek Acronym," that sentence may as well be written in Greek. If I were to de-acronym it, I'd say, "I began my career as a Game Service Provider" and hosted Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP sites with Web Host Managed for Small- and Medium-sized Businesses ... no big deal." For many, the humble acronym is a cornerstone of what it means to be a true techie. Stringing together dozens of three-letter abbreviations (TLAs) to compose semi-coherent sentences would seem to demonstrate your mastery of technology ... The problem is that if the reader of that sentence doesn't have the context you have, it's not very easy to easily get up to speed.

Every profession has their collection of acronyms. The little expressions serve as a verbal and written short hand for people who toil daily with the topics of their trade. I'm proud to confess that I've been using these minute medleys of letters for over twelve years. Given that I work on the Internet, I've been exposed to hundreds of acronyms in the fields of technology, business and management, and in my experience, I've had to break through several acronym "barriers" to get in the know. Because I happen to interact with customers every day as the manager of SoftLayer's technical support department, I've encountered a few "Can you tell means?" responses, so I thought I'd write a quick blog post to clarify some of the common acronyms you may see in the SoftLayer vernacular.

Within support we have our CSTs (customer support technicians) and CSAs (customer support admins) who, with the help of SBTs (server build technicians), manage our massive fleet of servers. SBTs are the hands and eyes of our data centers, working closely with the hardware to ensure your server is online and operating in peak condition. The CSTs and CSAs are focused on the software and services that power your websites and applications.

Beyond employee title acronyms, you'll probably see a collection of terms that describe the products and services that we manage. In support, we receive questions about accessing servers or CCIs (cloud computing instances) using KVM (Keyboard, Video and Mouse) or IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface) through our VPN (Virtual Private Network). Once connected to our back-end network through a SSL (Secure Socket Layer), PPTP (Point-to-Point Tunnel Protocol) or IPSEC (Internet Protocol Security) VPN, you have access to services such as DNS (Domain Name Service), NAS (Network Attached Storage) or iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface). Finally, while discussing our network, I often refer to http://www.softlayer.com/diagrams/pod-network-diagram/dal05 to show the difference between a VER (VPN Edge Router) and a BCS (Back-end Customer Switch).

If you run across an acronym you don't understand in a ticket, please let us know so we can share its full meaning ... By using these shortened terms, our team can provider faster service (and you can read their responses quicker). I know that seeing all the bold TLAs above may seem a little off-putting initially, but as you have a chance to read them in the context of some of the other acronyms you already know, I hope you have an "Aha!" moment ... Like finding the Rosetta Stone or the Code of Hammurabi. Given the quick glance at the terms above, if you want to learn more about one of the TLAs in particular, leave a comment below, and we'll respond in another comment with details.

CBNO

-Chris

April 6, 2009

Solid State Drives – In House Performance Stats

I love working at SoftLayer. I get to play with the newest hardware before anyone else. Intel, Adaptec, Supermicro… The list goes on. If they are going to release something new, we get to play with it first. I also like progression. Speed, size, performance, reliability; I like new products and technologies that make big jumps in these areas. I am always looking to push components and complete systems to the limits.

But alas, Thomas Norris stole my thunder! Check out his article “SSD: A Peek into the Future” for the complete skinny on the SSD’s we use. I seem to be a bit to concise for a nice long blog anyways. But not to worry, I’ve got some nifty numbers that will blow the jam out of your toes!

Solid State Drives (SSD) represent a large jump in drive performance. Not to mention smaller physical size, lower power consumption, and lower heat emissions. The majority of drive activity is random read/write. SSD drives have drastically improved in this area compared to mechanical drives. This results in a drastic overall performance increase for SSD drives.

This is a comparison of the Intel 32GB X25-E Extreme drive vs. other drives we carry. Note the massive jump in the random read/write speed of the SSD drive.

No more waiting on physical R/W heads to move around. How archaic!

Chart

Please note that no performance utility should be used to definitively judge a component or system. In the end, only real time usage is the final judge. But performance tests can give you a good idea of how a component or system compares to others.

Single drive performance increases directly translate into big improvements for RAID configurations as well. I have compared two of our fastest SATA and SAS four drive RAID 10 setups to a four drive SSD RAID 10 using an Adaptec 5405 Controller.

Chart

The Adaptec 5405 RAID controller certainly plays a part in the performance increase, on top on the simple speed doubling due to 2 drives being read simultaneously. (See my future blog on the basics or RAID levels, or check Wikipedia) .

Propeller heads read on:

The numbers indicate a multiplied increase if you take the base drive speed (Cheetah – 11.7mbps / X25-E – 64.8mbps) and double it (the theoretical increase a RAID 10 would give): 23.4mbps and 129.6mbps respectively. Actually performance tests show 27.3mbps and 208.1mbps. That means the Cheetahs are getting a 15% performance boost on random read/write and the X25-E a whopping 37% due to the RAID card. Hooray for math!

Once again, this is all performance tests and a bit of math speculation. The only real measure of performance, IMO, is how it performs the job you need it to do.

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