Posts Tagged 'RDP'

February 20, 2012

Tips and Tricks - Remote Audio Over RDP in Windows 2008

I was working on my server the other night, and I found myself needing to get sound from my Windows 2008 box through an RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) connection. Because we have a huge customer base with Windows 2008 installed now, I figured there may be someone else out there that would like to be able to hear sounds from their server on their local computer when connected, so I put together a quick walkthrough with how I got it to work:

Configuring Your Server

  1. Open Windows Services (Start -> Run -> Services.msc)
  2. Change the properties of the Windows Audio Endpoint Service and Windows Audio Service to "Automatic". If the services are not already started, you can manually start them at this time.
  3. Open Terminal Services ( Start -> Run -> tsconfig.msc)
  4. Right-click on the RDP-TCP connection and bring up its properties. Go to the "Client Settings" and make sure that on "Redirection Audio" is not disabled.
  5. Fully log out and log back into the RDP connection to the server. You will see a balloon error on your speaker icon that states "No Audio Output Device is installed."

Making Registry Changes

  1. You will now need to back up your registry and some registry changes.
  2. I want to reiterate the instruction to back up your registry ... As with most technical guides/walkthroughs, SoftLayer will not be held liable for any corruptions that may result from you attempting these changes. The next two steps will show how to quickly back up your registry.
  3. Log into your server on an account with Administrator rights, and open regedit (Start -> Run -> regedit)
  4. Export the current registry (from the "File" menu) and copy it to a location off of your server so you have it backed up.
  5. Locate the following key: HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AudioEngine\AudioProcessingObjects. This will contain several subkeys all each named with a GUID.
  6. Click on each subkey, then right-click and select "Permissions." You will then click on the "Advanced" button and the "Owner" tab. The current owner should be listed as "TrustedInstaller."
  7. Select the Administrative account and/or group from the list and click "OK" to change the ownership.
  8. Select the account you just chose and give it "Full Control," then click "OK."
  9. In the "Detail" box of each subkey, double-click on the DWORD value "MinOutputConnections" and change it from 1 to 0, then click "OK."
  10. Once you have done this for each subkey in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\AudioEngine\AudioProcessingObjects, you can close regedit and restart the Windows Audio and Windows Audio Endpoint services.

Configuring Your RDP Client

Now that you have everything ready on the server, you just need to make sure your RDP client recognizes the audio. Log off of the server so you can configure your RDP client. Open RDP, go to the "Options" menu, and under "Local Resources," select "Configure Remote Audio Settings." Select "Play on this Computer," and hit "OK." Voila! You now should be able to hear sound from your Windows 2008 RDP connection.

-Bill

September 10, 2008

Help! My Server Blocked Me!

Ok, the title of this blog may sound funny but you would be surprised how many phone calls I get about that very subject. Sure it’s not that specific case every time, sometimes it’s a software issue, other times hardware. But in the end not being able to access your server is the worst feeling in the world.

Enter KVM over IP. (Also known as Keyboard-Video-Mouse)

Yes boys and girls, this wonderful feature provided on all mid to high-performance multi-core servers can be your best friend in a time of need. While on a routine support call, a customer of mine stated the server was blocking not only himself but a lot of his customers. I kept a level head and told him it was no problem. He paused for a moment then let me know just how big a deal it was, while he was explaining I promptly used the KVM to login to his server and shutdown the firewall. All of a sudden he stopped talking and said “It’s working!”, “What did you do?” I explained to him how KVM works just as if you were hooking up a console to your server, and can be used even if your public Ethernet cable is unplugged. I went on to show him where it was in his home portal and how all of this was given to him for free. Also I explained the issue had been fixed from my desk without ever having access to either the public or private ports on his server. The customer had never heard of such a feature and was amazed at how easy it was to use.

The beauty of KVM over IP is it removes the one thing many server owners dread, not being able to be in the data center when issues arise with their standard connection methods (RDP, SSH). With KVM over IP we are giving the customer a solution to that problem. Via KVM you can login to the management interface card, which in most cases resides on an entirely different network, and within seconds you will have access to your terminal as if you were standing right there in the datacenter!!! Not only can you connect to your server, you can manually power it on/off and also reboot your server all within the same management screen. Beyond server access you can monitor temperature readings as well as fan speeds in the server. The KVM card is a HUGE tool in any Softlayer customers’ toolbox and one that we in the Operations Team use often.

Here at Softlayer we are always thinking about how to make your business easier to run, whether it be implementing global services such as CDN, or making sure our customers have basic access to their server in the event of a crisis. Since starting my career here at Softlayer and learning of the KVM feature I’ve made it a point to inform the customer of the KVM interface along with all features that are offered to them (and believe me they never stop coming!) so be sure and check our announcements page because you never know what we will come out with next!

-Romeo

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