Posts Tagged 'Remote Management'

October 19, 2007

A Well Designed Infrastructure Makes Everyone Green

As we all know there is an incredible amount of attention being paid to the “greening” of IT. Most people in the hosting industry regard this as the responsibility of the datacenter, as they can make the largest impact with their large-scale deployments of energy-efficient power supplies and processors, efficient physical layouts, cooling practices, and recycling.

Outside of the hosting industry the options become more varied—namely the ability to save massive amounts of power by turning off unneeded infrastructure during non-peak times. A great example would be a call center that operates 9-5 and shuts their workstations down when not in use, or an accounting firm that turns off their billing servers when they go home for the day. This is far from a common practice currently, but it is a very logical and easy step to conserving power. The gotcha here is that unless you can physically walk over to the infrastructure and power it back on, you are going to have to call someone to do it for you. Then wait for them to do it for you. Then hope that they don't forget. This leaves many businesses with infrastructure in an outsourced datacenter throwing their hands in the air, because it's frankly just too risky to not have their resources available at 9:00am when their day starts—might as well just leave everything on.

The story is a little different here at SoftLayer. Using our innovative network design and remote power control, our customers are redefining the way that IT is deployed in an outsourced datacenter. They run their web and mail servers here, pretty normal stuff. But utilizing the SSL to private backend network feature (allowing them to completely disable connectivity to the public network), they are also deploying their domain controllers here. And their office file servers. And their central servers to which their local thin clients connect. They are getting them out of the closet in the back of the office and into a datacenter on enterprise-grade hardware. And you know what they do at the end of the day? They turn them off. The next morning, a click on the power control in the SoftLayer Portal brings them instantly back online anytime, day or night. No phone call to support needed, no waiting for someone else to do it for you. The impact of technology designed to give you optimal control of your IT environment is staggering, especially when you see so many companies utilizing it.

So not only can you choose to deploy your operations in a datacenter that is making enormous strides in green infrastructure, but you can also deploy in one that provides you with the ability to control your own impact as well.

And just like that, everyone gets to be green. And sorry, envy doesn't count.

-Joshua

July 27, 2007

Remote Access Success Story

In previous posts, there have been mentions of the datacenter of the future, kvm over IP and a reference to an elevator. Then, just the other day, someone in the office pointed out this article: "How remote management saved me an emergency flight overseas"

The article discusses the successful deployment of servers from a remote location. The author talks about being able to remotely configure and deploy some new servers from the confines of a ski lodge. Of course, they had to have someone at their offices to receive the server shipment, unbox the servers, rack them up, get them all cabled, make sure space, power and cooling would all be sufficient and then put in a CD. Things that weren't mentioned probably included throwing away all of the packaging material, doing QA on the hardware to verify it was all correct and changing any BIOS settings.

Beyond all of that, there are many things that are just inherent to the process that they didn’t refer to, including having to find the right server vendor, negotiating pricing for the servers, making sure all of the pieces and parts were going to be shipped, tracking the shipment dates, contacting the vendor multiple times to try to find out why the shipment wasn't going to be on time, having available datacenter space and infrastructure, putting those dang cage nuts in the server racks, having available switch ports, making sure the network was configured correctly, providing network security, making sure all of the software licenses were up to date, etc, etc, etc.

Or, as so many of you already know - they could have gotten their servers from a dedicated hosting provider such as SoftLayer (hint, hint) and had the servers purchased, configured, QA’d and online within just a couple of hours and with no more effort than just filling out a signup form. It’s hard to imagine there are still so many people out there doing things the hard way.

-SamF

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