Posts Tagged 'Restore'

February 28, 2012

14 Questions Every Business Should Ask About Backups

Unfortunately, having "book knowledge" (or in this case "blog knowledge") about backups and applying that knowledge faithfully and regularly are not necessarily one and the same. Regardless of how many times you hear it or read it, if you aren't actively protecting your data, YOU SHOULD BE.

Here are a few questions to help you determine whether your data is endangered:

  1. Is your data backed up?
  2. How often is your data backed up?
  3. How often do you test your backups?
  4. Is your data backed up externally from your server?
  5. Are your backups in another data center?
  6. Are your backups in another city?
  7. Are your backups stored with a different provider?
  8. Do you have local backups?
  9. Are your backups backed up?
  10. How many people in your organization know where your backups are and how to restore them?
  11. What's the greatest amount of data you might lose in the event of a server crash before your next backup?
  12. What is the business impact of that data being lost?
  13. If your server were to crash and the hard drives were unrecoverable, how long would it take you to restore all of your data?
  14. What is the business impact of your data being lost or inaccessible for the length of time you answered in the last question?

We can all agree that the idea of backups and data protection is a great one, but when it comes to investing in that idea, some folks change their tune. While each of the above questions has a "good" answer when it comes to keeping your data safe, your business might not need "good" answers to all of them for your data to be backed up sufficiently. You should understand the value of your data to your business and invest in its protection accordingly.

For example, a million-dollar business running on a single server will probably value its backups more highly than a hobbyist with a blog she contributes to once every year and a half. The million-dollar business needs more "good" answers than the hobbyist, so the business should invest more in the protection of its data than the hobbyist.

If you haven't taken time to quantify the business impact of losing your primary data (questions 11-14), sit down with a pencil and paper and take time to thoughtfully answer those questions for your business. Are any of those answers surprising to you? Do they make you want to reevaluate your approach to backups or your investment in protecting your data?

The funny thing about backups is that you don't need them until you NEED them, and when you NEED them, you'll usually want to kick yourself if you don't have them.

Don't end up kicking yourself.

-@khazard

P.S. SoftLayer has a ton of amazing backup solutions but in the interested of making this post accessible and sharable, I won't go crazy linking to them throughout the post. The latest product release that got me thinking about this topic was the SoftLayer Object Storage launch, and if you're concerned about your answers to any of the above questions, object storage may be an economical way to easily get some more "good" answers.

August 18, 2009

Backups Are Not the Whole Story

Last night while making my regular backup for my World of Warcraft configuration, I thought about the blog and I didn't remember seeing an article that went into more detail than "backups are good" about backing up and restoring data.

If you've been around the InnerLayer for a while you will have noticed that backing up of data comes up periodically.  This happens because we frequently see customers whose world is turned upside down due to a mistyped command wiping out their data.  If you just thought "that won't happen to me... I'm careful at a prompt"... well, how about a cracker getting in via an IIS zero day exploit?  Kernel bug corrupting the filesystem?  Hard drive failure?  Data loss will happen to you, whatever the cause.

Data that is not backed up is data that isn't viewed as important by the server administrator.  As the title of this blog mentioned, backing up isn't the end of the server administrator's responsibility.  Consider the following points.

  • Is the backup in a safe location?  Backing up to the same hard drive which houses the live data is not a good practice.
  • Is the backup valid?  Did the commands to create it all run properly?  Did they get all the information you need?  Do you have enough copies?
  • Can your backup restore a single file or directory?  Do you know how to restore it?  Simply put, a restore is getting data from a backup back into a working state on a system.

Backup Safety
At a minimum backups should be stored on a separate hard drive from the data which the backup is protecting.  Better would be a local copy of the backup on the machine in use and having a copy of the backup off the machine, perhaps in eVault, on a NAS which is _NOT_ always mounted, even on another server.  Why?  The local backup gives you quick access to the content while the off-machine copies give you the safety that if one of your employees does a secure wipe on the machine in question you haven't lost the data and the backup.

Validity
A backup is valid if it gets all the data you need to bring your workload back online in the event of a failure.  This could be web pages, database data, config files (frequently forgotten) and notes on how things work together.  Information systems get complicated and if you've got a Notepad file somewhere listing how Tab A goes into Slot B, that should be in your backups.  Yes, you know how it works... great, you get hit by a bus, does your co-admin know how that system is put together?  Don't forget dependencies.  A forum website is pretty worthless if it is backed up but the database to which it looks is not.  For me another mark of a valid backup is one which has some history.  Do not backup today and delete yesterday.  Leave a week or more of backups available.  People don't always notice immediately that something has broken.

Restores
A good way to test a restore is get a 2nd server for a month configured the same as your primary then take the backup from the primary and restore it onto the secondary.  See what happens.  Maybe it will go great.  Probably you will run into issues.  Forget about a small operating system tweak made some morning at 4am?  How about time?  How long does it take to go from a clean OS install to a working system?  If this time is too long, you might have too much going on one server and need to split up your workload among a few servers.  As with everything else in maintaining a server, practicing your restores is not a one-time thing.  Schedule yourself a couple of days once a quarter to do a disaster simulation.

For those who might be looking at this and saying "That is a lot of work".  Yes, it is.  It is part of running a server.  I do this myself on a regular basis for a small server hosting e-mail and web data for some friends.  I have a local "configbackup" directory on the server which has the mail configs, the server configs, the nameserver configs and the database data.  In my case, I've told my users straight up that their home directories are their own responsibility.  Maybe you can do that, maybe not.  Weekly that configback data is copied to a file server here at my apartment.  The fileserver itself is backed up periodically to USB drive which is kept at a friend's house.

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