Posts Tagged 'Security Management'

August 11, 2014

I PLEB Allegiance to My Data!

As a "techy turned marketing turned social media turned compliance turned security turned management" guy, I have had the pleasure of talking to many different customers over the years and have heard horror stories about data loss, data destruction, and data availability. I have also heard great stories about how to protect data and the differing ways to approach data protection.

On a daily basis, I deal with NIST 800-53 rev.4, PCI, HIPAA, CSA, FFIEC, and SOC controls among many others. I also deal with specific customer security worksheets that ask for information about how we (SoftLayer) protect their data in the cloud.

My first response is always, WE DON’T!

The looks I’ve seen on faces in reaction to that response over the years have been priceless. Not just from customers but from auditors’ faces as well.

  • They ask how we back up customer data. We don’t.
  • They ask how we make it redundant. We don’t.
  • They ask how we make it available 99.99 percent of the time. We don’t.

I have to explain to them that SoftLayer is simply infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and we stop there. All other data planning should be done by the customer. OK, you busted me, we do offer managed services as an additional option. We help the customer using that service to configure and protect their data.

We hear from people about Personal Health Information (PHI), credit card data, government data, banking data, insurance data, proprietary information related to code and data structure, and APIs that should be protected with their lives, etc. What is the one running theme? It’s data. And data is data folks, plain and simple!

Photographers want to protect their pictures, chefs want to protect their recipes, grandparents want to protect the pictures of their grandkids, and the Dallas Cowboys want to protect their playbook (not that it is exciting or anything). Data is data, and it should be protected.

So how do you go about doing that? That's where PLEB, the weird acronym in the title of this post, comes in!

PLEB stands for Physical, Logical, Encryption, Backups.

If you take those four topics into consideration when dealing with any type of data, you can limit the risk associated with data loss, destruction, and availability. Let’s look at the details of the four topics:

  • Physical Security—In a cloud model it is on the shoulders of the cloud service provider (CSP) to meet strict requirements of a regulated workload. Your CSP should have robust physical controls in place. They should be SOC2 audited, and you should request the SOC2 report showing little or no exceptions. Think cameras, guards, key card access, bio access, glass alarms, motion detectors, etc. Some, if not all, of these should make your list of must-haves.
  • Logical Access—This is likely a shared control family when dealing with cloud. If the CSP has a portal that can make changes to your systems and the portal has a permissions engine allowing you to add users, then that portion of logical access is a shared control. First, the CSP should protect its portal permission system, while the customer should protect admin access to the portal by creating new privileged users who can make changes to systems. Second, and just as important, when provisioning you must remove the initial credentials setup and add new, private credentials and restrict access accordingly. Note, that it’s strictly a customer control.
  • Encryption—There are many ways to achieve encryption, both at rest and in transit. For data at rest you can use full disk encryption, virtual disk encryption, file or folder encryption, and/or volume encryption. This is required for many regulated workloads and is a great idea for any type of data with personal value. For public data in transit, you should consider SSL or TLS, depending on your needs. For backend connectivity from your place of business, office, or home into your cloud infrastructure, you should consider a secure VPN tunnel for encryption.
  • Backups—I can’t stress enough that backups are not just the right thing to do, they are essential, especially when using IaaS. You want a copy at the CSP you can use if you need to restore quickly. But, you want another copy in a different location upon the chance of a disaster that WILL be out of your control.

So take the PLEB and mitigate risk related to data loss, data destruction, and data availability. Trust me—you will be glad you did.

-@skinman454

May 8, 2014

SoftLayer Security: Questions and Answers

When I talk to IBM Business Partners about SoftLayer, one of the most important topics of discussion is security. We ask businesses to trust SoftLayer with their business-critical data, so it’s important that SoftLayer’s physical and network security is as transparent and understandable as possible.

After going through the notes I’ve taken in many of these client meetings, I pulled out the ten most frequently asked questions about security, and I’ve compiled answers.

Q1: How is SoftLayer secured? What security measures does SoftLayer have in place to ensure my workloads are safe?

A: This “big picture” question is the most common security-related question I’ve heard. SoftLayer’s approach to security involves several distinct layers, so it’s tough to generalize every aspect in a single response. Here are some of the highlights:

  • SoftLayer’s security management is aligned with U.S. government standards based on NIST 800-53 framework, a catalog of security and privacy controls defined for U.S. federal government information systems. SoftLayer maintains SOC 2 Type II reporting compliance for every data center. SOC 2 reports are audits against controls covering security, availability, and process integrity. SoftLayer’s data centers are also monitored 24x7 for both network and on-site security.
  • Security is maintained through automation (less likely for human error) and audit controls. Server room access is limited to authorized employees only, and every location is protected against physical intrusion.
  • Customers can create a multi-layer security architecture to suit their needs. SoftLayer offers several on-demand server and network security devices, such as firewalls and gateway appliances.
  • SoftLayer integrates three distinct network topologies for each physical or virtual server and offers security solutions for systems, applications, and data as well. Each customer has one or many VLANs in each data center facility, and only users and servers the customer authorizes can access servers in those VLANs.
  • SoftLayer offers single-tenant resources, so customers have complete control and transparency into their servers.

Q2: Does SoftLayer destroy my data when I’ve de-provisioned a compute resource?

A: Yes. When a customer cancels any physical or virtual server, all data is erased using Department of Defense (DoD) 5220.22-m standards.

Q3: How does SoftLayer protect my servers against distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks?

A: A SoftLayer Network Operations Center (NOC) team monitors network performance and security 24x7. Automated DDoS mitigation controls are in place should a DDoS attack occur.

It’s important to clarify here that the primary objective of this DDoS mitigation is to maintain performance integrity of the overall cloud infrastructure. With that in mind, SoftLayer can’t stop a customer from being attacked, but it can shield the customer (and any other customers in the same network) from the effects of the attack. If necessary, SoftLayer will remove the target from the public network for periods of time and null-routes incoming connections. Because of SoftLayer’s three-tiered network architecture, a customer would still have access to the targeted system via the private network.

Q4: How is communication segmented from other tenants using SoftLayer?

A: SoftLayer utilizes industry standard VLANs and switch access control lists (ACLs) to segment customer environments. Customers have the ability to add and manage their own VLANs, providing additional security even inside their own accounts. ACLs are configured to permit or deny any specified network packet (data) to be directed along a switch.

Q5: How is my data kept private? How can I confirm that SoftLayer can’t read my confidential data?

A: This question is common customers who deal with sensitive workloads such as HIPAA-protected documentation, employee records, case files, and so on.

SoftLayer customers are encouraged to deploy a gateway device (e.g. Vyatta appliance) on which they can configure encryption protocols. Because the gateway device is the first hop into SoftLayer’s network, it provides an encrypted tunnel to traverse the VLANs that reside on SoftLayer. When securing compute and storage resources, customers can deploy single tenant dedicated storage devices to establish isolated workloads, and they can even encrypt their hard drives from the OS level to protect data at rest. Encrypting the hard drive helps safeguard data even if SoftLayer were to replace a drive or something similar.

Q6: Does SoftLayer track and log customer environments?

A: Yes. SoftLayer audits and tracks all user activity in our customer portal. Some examples of what is tracked include:

  • User access, both failed and authenticated attempts (destination IP is shown on a report)
  • Compute resources users deploy or cancel
  • APIs for each call (who called the API, the API call and function, etc.)
  • Intrusion Protection and Detection services that observe traffic to customer hosts
  • Additionally, customers have root access to operating systems on their servers, so they can implement additional logging of their own.

Q7: Can I disable access to some of my users through the customer portal?

A: Yes. SoftLayer has very granular ACLs. User entitlements are segmented into different categories, including Support, Security, and Hardware. SoftLayer also gives customers the ability to limit access to public and private networks. Customers can even limit user access to specific bare metal or virtual server.

Q8: Does SoftLayer patch my operating system?

A: For unmanaged cloud servers, no. Once the updated operating system is deployed on a customer’s server, SoftLayer doesn’t touch it.

If you want help with that hands-on server administration, SoftLayer offers managed hosting. In a managed hosting environment, Technical Account Managers (TAMs) are assigned as focal points for customer requests and issues. TAMs help with reports and trending data that provide recommendations to mitigate potential issues (including OS patching).

Q9: Is SoftLayer suited to run HIPAA workloads?

A: Yes. SoftLayer has a number of customers running HIPAA workloads on both bare metal and single-tenant virtual servers. A Business Associate Agreement (BAA), signed by SoftLayer and the customers, clearly define the shared responsibilities for data security: SoftLayer is solely responsible for the security of the physical data center, along with the SoftLayer-provided infrastructure.

Q10: Can SoftLayer run government workloads? Does SoftLayer use the FISMA standards?

A: The Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) defines a framework for managing information security that must be followed for all federal information systems. Some state institutions don’t require FISMA, but look to cloud hosting companies to be aligned to the FIMSA guidelines.

Today, two SoftLayer data centers are audited to the FISMA standards – Dallas (DAL05) and Washington, D.C. (WDC01). Customers looking for the FISMA standard can deploy their workloads in those data centers. Future plans include having data centers that comply with more stringent FedRAMP requests.

For additional information, I highly recommend the on-demand SoftLayer Fundamentals session, “Keep safe – securing your SoftLayer virtual instance.” Also, check out Allan Tate’s Thoughts on Cloud blog, “HIPAA and cloud computing: What you need to know” for more on how SoftLayer handles HIPPA-related workloads.

-Darrel Haswell

Darrel Haswell is a Worldwide Channel Solutions Architect for SoftLayer, an IBM Company.

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