Posts Tagged 'Settings'

February 20, 2015

Create and Deliver Marketing or Transactional Emails

The SoftLayer email delivery service is a highly scalable, cloud-based, email relay solution. In partnership with SendGrid, an email as a service provider, SoftLayer customers are able to create and deliver marketing or transactional emails via the customer portal or SendGrid APIs.

The SoftLayer email delivery service isn’t a full corporate email solution. It’s intended as a simplified method for delivering digital marketing (e.g., newsletters and coupons) and transactional content (e.g., order confirmation, shipping notice, and password reset) to customers.

Architecture

Traditionally, email is first sent through an outbound mail server that’s configured and maintained in-house, which is often costly and difficult to maintain.

With the SoftLayer email delivery service, the process is simplified; the only requirement is a connection to the Internet.

Package Comparison

The following table lists the service levels available to SoftLayer customers. The Free and Basic tiers are suitable for smaller applications with lower volume requirements. The Advanced and Enterprise levels are more suitable for larger applications and customers that require enhanced monitoring and other advanced features. Note that marketing emails are only available in the Advanced and Enterprise tiers.

Getting Started

Use the following steps to sign up for the SoftLayer email delivery service.

  1. Log on to the customer portal.
  2. Click Services, Email Delivery.
  3. Click the Order Email Delivery Service link at the top of the page.
  4. Choose your desired package, and fill out the required information. Remember for marketing emails, you must select either the Advanced or Enterprise packages.

Configuring a Marketing Email

Most of your interaction will be through the vendor portal provided by SendGrid. The following steps outline how to compose and deliver a marketing email to a list of subscribers.

  1. From the SoftLayer customer portal, navigate to Services, Email Delivery Service and click Actions, Access Vendor Portal for your desired account.
  2. Once in the SendGrid portal, click the Marketing Email link.

  1. You’ll be taken to the Marketing Email Dashboard. Click the Create a Sender Address button.
  2. Fill in the required information and click Save.
  3. Navigate back to the Marketing Email Dashboard, and click the Create Recipient List button.
  4. Enter a name for the list in the List Name field. Be sure that it’s something meaningful, such as Residential Customers.

  1. You can either Upload a list of contact emails or Add recipients manually. When adding the recipients manually, you’ll be asked verify the addresses that you enter. Click the Save button when done entering addresses.

  1. Navigate back to the Marketing Email Dashboard and click the Create Marketing Email button.
  2. Enter the title of the email in the Marketing Email Title field. Under Pick a Sender Address, select either a list or select recipients for the email. Choose your content type and how to send the email. Split Test my Marketing Email, under Choose how to send your Marketing Email, is an advanced feature that lets you send different recipients different versions of the same email—sending the different versions helps determine which version is most effective.

  1. Select the list of recipients to whom the email is to be sent and click Save.

  1. Next, select the template for the email. Options include Basic, Design, and My Saved Templates.

  1. Enter your email content. Make sure to provide a message subject.
  2. Review your email, and select when you would like it sent—Send Now, based on a Schedule, or Save As Draft. Click Finish when you’re done, or Save & Exit for a draft.

  1. You will then be brought back to the Marketing Email Dashboard where you can monitor the results of your email campaign.

Setting Up a Transactional Email

The following example shows how to integrate your app with SendGrid to send new users a welcome email. This example makes use of the SendGrid template engine, although it’s not required.

  1. From the SendGrid portal, click the Template Engine button.
  2. Click the Create Template button, enter the Template Name, and click Save.

  1. Design and modify your email and click Save when finished.

  1. Your new template should now be Active and ready to be used by the API.
  2. Click the Apps link in the top navigation bar.

  1. Click the Template Engine link on the right side of the screen.

  1. Take note of the ID of the template you just created.

  1. Use the curl utility to test your email via the SendGrid Web API.
  2. Execute the following to send a test email using your new template.


curl -d 'to=&subject="Test
subject"&text="Test Body"&from=&api_user=;api_key=
&x-smtpapi={"filters":{"templates":{"settings":{"enable":1,"template_id":
"6770c11f-97d5-4be9-8811-c86525799ec9"}}}}' https://api.sendgrid.com/api/mail.send.json

For more information on how the SoftLayer email delivery service can help you get back to your core business, check out this blog post.

-Sean

Worldwide Channel Solutions Architect for SoftLayer, an IBM Company

December 1, 2011

UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp: Permissions

I hope you brought your sweat band ... Today's Boot Camp workout is going to be pretty intense. We're focusing on our permissions muscles. Permissions in a UNIX environment cause a lot of customer issues ... While everyone understands the value of secure systems and limited access, any time an "access denied" message pops up, the most common knee-jerk reaction is to enable full access to one's files (chmod 777, as I'll explain later). This is a BAD IDEA. Open permissions are a hacker's dream come true. An open permission setting might have been a temporary measure, but more often than not, the permissions are left in place, and the files remain vulnerable.

To better understand how to use permissions, let's take a step back and get a quick refresher on key components.

You'll need to remember the three permission types:

r w x: r = read; w = write; x = execute

And the three types of access they can be applied to:

u g o: u = user; g = group; o = other

Permissions are usually displayed in one of two ways – either with letters (rwxrwxrwx) or numbers (777). When the permissions are declared with letters, you should look at it as three sets of three characters. The first set applies to the user, the second applies to the group, and the third applies to other (everyone else). If a file is readable only by the user and cannot be written to or executed by anyone, its permission level would be r--------. If it could be read by anyone but could only be writeable by the user and the group, its permission level would be rw-rw-r--.

The numeric form of chmod uses bits to represent permission levels. Read access is marked by 4 bits, write is 2, and execute is 1. When you want a file to have read and write access, you just add the permission bits: 4 + 2 = 6. When you want a file to have read, write and execute access, you'll have 4 + 2 + 1, or 7. You'd then apply that numerical permission to a file in the same order as above: user, group, other. If we used the example from the last sentence in the previous paragraph, a file that could be read by anyone, but could only be writeable by the user and the group, would have a numeric permission level of 664 (user: 6, group: 6, other: 4).

Now the "chmod 777" I referenced above should make a little more sense: All users are given all permissions (4 + 2 + 1 = 7).

Applying Permissions

Understanding these components, applying permissions is pretty straightforward with the use of the chmod command. If you want a user (u) to write and execute a file (wx) but not read it (r), you'd use something like this:

chmod Output

In the above terminal image, I added the -v parameter to make it "verbose," so it displays the related output or results of the command. The permissions set by the command are shown by the number 0300 and the series (-wx------). Nobody but the user can write or execute this file, and as of now, the user can't even read the file. If you were curious about the leading 0 in "0300," it simply means that you're viewing an octal output, so for our purposes, it can be ignored entirely.

In that command, we're removing the read permission from the user (hence the minus sign between u and r), and we're giving the user write and execute permissions with the plus sign between u and wx. Want to alter the group or other permissions as well? It works exactly the same way: g+,g-,o+,o- ... Getting the idea? chmod permissions can be set with the letter-based commands (u+r,u-w) or with their numeric equivalents (eg. 400 or 644), whichever floats your boat.

A Quick Numeric chmod Reference

chmod 777 | Gives specified file read, write and execute permissions (rwx) to ALL users
chmod 666 | Allows for read and write privileges (rw) to ALL users
chmod 555 | Gives read and execute permissions (rx) to ALL users
chmod 444 | Gives read permissions (r) to ALL users
chmod 333 | Gives write and execute permissions (wx) to ALL users
chmod 222 | Gives write privileges (w) to ALL users
chmod 111 | Gives execute privileges (x) to ALL users
chmod 000 | Last but not least, gives permissions to NO ONE (Careful!)

Get a List of File Permissions

To see what your current file permissions are in a given directory, execute the ls –l command. This returns a list of the current directory including the permissions, the group it's in, the size and the last date the file was modified. The output of ls –l looks like this:

ls -l Output

On the left side of that image, you'll see the permissions in the rwx format. When the permission begins with the "d" character, it means that object is a directory. When the permission starts with a dash (-), it is a file.

Practice Deciphering Permissions

Let's look at a few examples and work backward to apply what we've learned:

  • Example 1: -rw-------
  • Example 2: drwxr-x---
  • Example 3: -rwxr-xr-x

In Example 1, the file is not a directory, the user that owns this particular object has read and write permissions, and when the group and other fields are filled with dashes, we know that their permissions are set to 0, so they have no access. In this case, only the user who owns this object can do anything with it. We'll cover "ownership" in a future blog, but if you're antsy to learn right now, you can turn to the all-knowing Google.

In Example 2, the permissions are set on a directory. The user has read, write and execute permissions, the group has read and execute permissions, and anything/anyone besides user or group is restricted from access.

For Example 3, put yourself to the test. What access is represented by "-rwxr-xr-x"? The answer is included at the bottom of this post.

Wrapping It Up

How was that for a crash course in Unix environment permissions? Of course there's more to it, but this will at least make you think about what kind of access you're granting to your files. Armed with this knowledge, you can create the most secure server environment.

Here are a few useful links you may want to peruse at your own convenience to learn more:

Linuxforums.org
Zzee.com
Comptechdoc.org
Permissions Calculator

Did I miss anything? Did I make a blatantly ridiculous mistake? Did I use "their" when I should have used "they're"??!!... Let me know about it. Leave a comment if you've got anything to add, suggest, subtract, quantize, theorize, ponderize, etc. Think your useful links are better than my useful links? Throw those at me too, and we'll toss 'em up here.

Are you still feeling the burn from your Sysadmin Boot Camp workout? Don't forget to keep getting reps in bash, logs, SSH, passwords and user management!

- Ryan

Example 3 Answer

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