Posts Tagged 'SSH'

August 15, 2011

UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp: bash

Welcome back to UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp. You've had a few days to get some reps in accessing your server via SSH, so it's about time we add some weight to your exercise by teaching you some of the tools you will be using regularly to manage your server.

As we mentioned earlier in this series, customers with control panels from cPanel and Parallels might be tempted to rely solely on those graphical interfaces. They are much more user-friendly in terms of performing routine server administration tasks, but at some point, you might need to get down and dirty on the command line. It's almost inevitable. This is where you'll use bash commands.

Here are some of the top 10 essential commands you should get to know and remember in bash. Click any of the commands to go to its official "manual" page.

  1. man – This command provides a manual of other bash commands. Want more info on a command? Type man commandname, and you'll get more information about "commandname" than you probably wanted to know. It's extremely useful if you need a quick reference for a command, and it's often much more detailed and readable than a simple --help or --h extension.
  2. ls – This command lets you list results. I showed you an example of this above, but the amount of options that are available to you with this command are worth looking into. Using the "manual" command above, run man ls and check out the possibilities. For example, if you're in /etc, running ls -l /etc will get you a slightly more detailed list. My most commonly used list command is ls -hal. Pop quiz for you (where you can test your man skills): What does the -hal mean?
  3. cd – This command lets you change directories. Want to go to /etc/? cd /etc/ will take you there. Want to jump back a directory? cd .. does the trick.
  4. mv – This command enables you to move files and folders. The syntax is mv originalpath/to/file newpath/to/file. Simple! There are more options that you can check out with the man command.
  5. rm – This command enables you to remove a file or directory. In the same vein as the mv command, this is one of those basic commands that you just have to know. By running rm filename, you remove the "filename" file.
  6. cp – This command enables you to copy files from one place to another. Want to make a backup of a file before editing it? Run cp origfile.bla origfile.bak, and you have a backup in case your edit of origfile.bla goes horrendously wrong and makes babies cry. The syntax is simply: cp /source /destination. As with the above commands, check out the manual by running man cp for more options.
  7. tar – On its own, tar is a command to group a bunch of files together, uncompressed. These files can then be compressed into .gzip format. The command can be used for creating or extracting, so it may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the parameters, as you may find yourself using it quite often. For a GUI equivalent, think 7-zip or WinRAR for Windows.
  8. wget – I love the simplicity of this little command. It enables you to "get" or download a target file. Yes, there are options, but all you need is a direct link to a file, and you just pull one of these: wget urlhere. Bam! That file starts downloading. Doesn't matter what kind of file it is, it's downloaded.
  9. top – This handy little binary will give you a live view of memory and CPU usage currently affecting your machine, and is useful for finding out where you need to optimize. It can also help you pinpoint what processes may be causing a slowdown or a load issue.
  10. chmod – This little sucker is vital to make your server both secure and usable, particularly when you're going to be serving for the public like you would with a web server. Combine good usage of permission and iptables, and you have a locked down server

When you understand how to use these tools, you can start to monitor and track what's actually happening on your server. The more you know about your server, the more effective and efficient you can make it. In our next installment, we'll touch on some of the most common server logs and what you can do with the information they provide.

Did I miss any of your "essential" bash commands in my top 10 list? Leave a comment below with your favorites along with a quick explanation of what they do.

-Ryan

August 12, 2011

UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp: An Intro to SSH

You've got a 'nix box set up. For some reason, you feel completely lost and powerless. It happens. Many a UNIX-related sob has been cried by confused and frustrated sysadmins, and it needs to stop. As a techie on the front lines of support, I've seen firsthand the issues that new and curious sysadmins seem to have. We have a lot of customers who like to dive head-first into a new environment, and we even encourage it. But there's quite a learning curve.

In my tenure at SoftLayer, I've come across a lot of customers who rely almost entirely on control panels provided by partners like cPanel and Parallels to administer their servers. While those panels simplify some fairly complex tasks to the touch of a button, we all know that one day you're going to have to get down and dirty in that SSH (Secure Shell) interface that so many UNIX server newbies fear.

I'm here to tell you that SSH can be your friend, if you treat it right. Graphical user interfaces like the ones used in control panels have been around for quite a while now, and despite the fact that we are in "the future," the raw power of a command line is still unmatched in its capabilities. It's a force to be reckoned with.

If you're accustomed to a UNIX-based interface, this may seem a little elementary, but you and I both know that as we get accustomed to something, we also tend to let those all-important "basics" slip from our minds. If you're coming from a Windows background and are new to the environment, you're in for a bit of a shell shock, no pun intended. The command line is fantastically powerful once you master it ... It just takes a little time and effort to learn.

We'll start slow and address some of the most common pain points for new sysadmins, and as we move forward, we'll tackle advanced topics. Set your brain to "absorbent," and visualize soaking up these UNIX tips like some kind of undersea, all-knowing, Yoda-like sea sponge.

SSH

SSH allows data to be exchanged securely between two networked devices, and when the "network" between your workstation and server is the Internet, the fact that it does so "securely" is significant. Before you can do any actual wielding of SSH, you're going to need to know how to find this exotic "command line" we've talked so much about.

You can use a third-party client such as PuTTY, WinSCP if your workstation is Windows-based, or if you're on Linux or Mac, you can access SSH from your terminal application: ssh user@ipaddress. Once you've gotten into your server, you'll probably want to find out where you are, so give the pwd command a try:

user@serv: ~$ pwd
/home/user
user@serv: ~$

It's as easy as that. Now we know we're in the /home/user directory. Most of the time, you'll find yourself starting in your home directory. This is where you can put personal files and documents. It's kind of like "My Documents" in Windows, just on your server.

Now that you know where you are, you'll probably want to know what's in there. Take a look at these commands (extracted from a RedHat environment, but also usable in CentOS and many other distributions):

    user@serv: /usr/src $ ls    
This will give you a basic listing of the current directory.

    user@serv: /usr/src $ ls /usr/src/redhat    
This will list the contents of another specified directory.

    user@serv: /usr/src $ ls ./redhat    
Using a "relative pathname," this will perform the same action as above.

    user@serv: /usr/src $ ls redhat    
Most of the time, you'll get the same results even without the "./" at the beginning.

    user@serv: /usr/src $ cd /usr/src/redhat/    
This is an example of using the cd command to change directories to an absolute pathname.

    user@serv: /usr/src $ cd redhat    
This is an example of using the cd command to change directories to a relative pathname.

    user@serv: /usr/src/redhat $ cd /usr/src    
To move back on directory from the working directory, you can use the destination's absolute path.

    user@serv: /usr/src/redhat $ cd ..    
Or, since the desired directory is one step down, you can use two dots to move back.

You'll notice many similarities to the typical Windows DOS prompts, so it helps if you're familiar with navigating through that interface: dir, cd, cd .., cd /. Everything else on the other hand, will prove to be a bit different.

Now that you're able to access this soon-to-be-powerful-for-you tool, you need to start learning the language of the natives: bash. In our next installment, we'll take a crash course in bash, and you'll start to get comfortable navigating and manipulating content directly on your server.

Bookmark the SoftLayer Blog and come back regularly to get the latest installments in our "UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp" series!

-Ryan

September 10, 2008

Help! My Server Blocked Me!

Ok, the title of this blog may sound funny but you would be surprised how many phone calls I get about that very subject. Sure it’s not that specific case every time, sometimes it’s a software issue, other times hardware. But in the end not being able to access your server is the worst feeling in the world.

Enter KVM over IP. (Also known as Keyboard-Video-Mouse)

Yes boys and girls, this wonderful feature provided on all mid to high-performance multi-core servers can be your best friend in a time of need. While on a routine support call, a customer of mine stated the server was blocking not only himself but a lot of his customers. I kept a level head and told him it was no problem. He paused for a moment then let me know just how big a deal it was, while he was explaining I promptly used the KVM to login to his server and shutdown the firewall. All of a sudden he stopped talking and said “It’s working!”, “What did you do?” I explained to him how KVM works just as if you were hooking up a console to your server, and can be used even if your public Ethernet cable is unplugged. I went on to show him where it was in his home portal and how all of this was given to him for free. Also I explained the issue had been fixed from my desk without ever having access to either the public or private ports on his server. The customer had never heard of such a feature and was amazed at how easy it was to use.

The beauty of KVM over IP is it removes the one thing many server owners dread, not being able to be in the data center when issues arise with their standard connection methods (RDP, SSH). With KVM over IP we are giving the customer a solution to that problem. Via KVM you can login to the management interface card, which in most cases resides on an entirely different network, and within seconds you will have access to your terminal as if you were standing right there in the datacenter!!! Not only can you connect to your server, you can manually power it on/off and also reboot your server all within the same management screen. Beyond server access you can monitor temperature readings as well as fan speeds in the server. The KVM card is a HUGE tool in any Softlayer customers’ toolbox and one that we in the Operations Team use often.

Here at Softlayer we are always thinking about how to make your business easier to run, whether it be implementing global services such as CDN, or making sure our customers have basic access to their server in the event of a crisis. Since starting my career here at Softlayer and learning of the KVM feature I’ve made it a point to inform the customer of the KVM interface along with all features that are offered to them (and believe me they never stop coming!) so be sure and check our announcements page because you never know what we will come out with next!

-Romeo

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