Posts Tagged 'Support'

October 16, 2015

Under the Infrastructure: Provisioning support technician Robert Molidor brings kindness to computers

After a few weeks in Amsterdam, Under the Infrastructure is bringing it on home to Texas. This week, we’re chatting up provisioning support technician Robert Molidor. He’s stationed in our DAL07 data center in Plano, where he’s been a SLayer for a little over two years.

Ready to meet him?

SoftLayer: What does “provisioning support” mean?

Robert Molidor: The provisioning support team provides level one support to technicians working in our data centers globally. Essentially, we support the provisioning process from build to final boot. If there is something we cannot handle, it gets escalated to other departments.

In addition to providing internal support, our team is also responsible for training new and old server build technicians. We have a group that does onboarding training and a group that does continuing education. All of our training is done remotely, so we don’t actually travel. Instead, we use webcams, chat, and email to connect with the people we’re teaching.

SL: How did you end up in this particular field in the wide world of tech jobs?

Molidor: I came across this position by chance. I had been experiencing a serious lull in employment opportunities and had been working in food service for almost 10 years. My education was doing nothing to help. After two years at Starbucks, I was fed up and shot a message out on Facebook. A buddy of mine responded, “What do you know about computers?” Little did he know I had been an enthusiast my entire life. We met up to discuss the position and a couple months later, I started at SoftLayer as a server build technician.

About a year went by, and I had been told many times to check out provisioning support because I would fit in well. I was hesitant, but decided to go for it. After speaking with the manager of the team and the regional manager that supervised my data center, it was agreed that I would make the move. At the beginning of the year, I was sitting at my new desk.

This job has taught me a ton and I am now with a team of people running continuing education courses. We help other techs gain the skills they need to lead their teams. It’s a lot of fun. My peers and I get to talk to people all over the world and hopefully leave them with a deeper understanding of how to better troubleshoot and respond to situations in their daily routines.

I really enjoy working on my current team, and the position really does suit me well.

SL: What special skills do you need to be successful as a member of a provisioning support team?

Molidor: I wouldn’t say any special skills are needed; it’s more general skills. It’s important to have an understanding of a wide range of possible situations and the ability to find solutions. That said, experience with internal management systems (IMS) and working in the server rooms is a huge advantage.

Our department requires that you’re a self-starter. Our boss isn’t telling us specifically what to do all day, so one needs to be on top of his or her own game and be ready to produce results in his or her own way. Some of us do support, some of us do onboard training, the rest of us do support and continuing education. This department relies on your interests and specific abilities to compliment the team as a whole as long as it’s within the scope of our function. At least that’s how I see it.

One characteristic of people that do well on our team is the ability (or perhaps tendency) to be kind to people. We deal with technicians all day that don’t quite have all the information they need, so it’s our job to help them solve whatever problems they are having and teach them how to fix it on their own the next time. This can really try a person's patience and the ones that enjoy it here have that patience to give. It can be a very rewarding yet challenging job.

SL: How many SoftLayer shirts do you own?

Molidor: I think I have three? Wearing SoftLayer swag is cool, but I’d much rather earn shirts by volunteering or attending events and seminars.

SL: Where would you go in a time machine?

Molidor: This topic could get pretty deep so I’ll leave it with this: I would go forward in time about 50 years to get a feel for how technology has developed. With that information, I would come back here and try to innovate change in an effort to be an integral part of what’s to come.

A technologist for the ages. We pick ‘em well.


June 22, 2015

3 Reasons Citrix NetScaler Should Be in Your PCI DSS Compliant Application Stack at SoftLayer

Whether you already process credit card information or are just starting to consider it, you’ve likely made yourself familiar with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS). The PCI-DSS’s 12 requirements (plus one appendix for service providers) outlines what you need to do to have a compliant workload and to pass your audits.

While SoftLayer handles the physical access and security aspects on our platform, we also offer tools to supplement your internal tools and processes to help you maintain PCI-DSS compliance such as the Citrix NetScaler VPX and MPX Platinum Edition product line.

Unique Features NetScaler Offers That Support PCI-DSS

  1. Mask Payment Account Numbers (PANs)
  2. With NetScaler Platinum Edition it’s possible to configure the device to block or mask PANs to prevent leakage of cardholder data—even if your application is attempting to present the data to a user. This is extremely useful when adhering to PCI-DSS Section 3.3—the first six and last four digits are the maximum number of digits to be displayed.

    NetScaler provides reporting as well so that your developers can tighten up that aspect of your application for more identification protection.

  3. Detect and Prevent Web-based Attacks
  4. By deploying a Web application firewall into your application stack, you can fully comply with PCI-DSS Section 6.6, which requires addressing new threats and vulnerabilities on an ongoing basis and ensuring these applications are protected against known attacks. The NetScaler Application Firewall module included in Platinum Edition provides continuous protection and can dynamically adjust to changes in your application code.

  5. Prevent Buffer Overflow, XML Security, Cross Site Scripting, & SQL Injection
  6. The NetScaler Web Application Firewall helps close the door on many common coding vulnerabilities outlined in PCI-DSS Section 6.5. By utilizing XML security protections, form tagging, dynamic context sensitive protections, and deep stream inspection, you can block, log, and report on these common security vectors and ensure your development team can shore up you applications

How to Order
SoftLayer offers Citrix NetScaler VPX Standard and Platinum Editions in multiple bandwidth packages—10Mbps, 200Mbps, and 1Gbps. Order these quickly and easily from your customer portal devices page (click order devices, scroll to networking devices, and select Citrix NetScaler).

SoftLayer also provides the NetScaler MPX for customers that require a dedicated hardware appliance running the NetScaler OS that can handle thousands of concurrent SSL transactions. To order the MPX product, chat with one of our sales advisors.

Be sure to take a look at some of the other features included with Citrix NetScaler.

Learn More About PCI-DSS
SoftLayer supports PCI workloads by providing the physical security required in the DSS. Within the customer portal you’re able to pull our most recent SOC 2 Type II audit report. You can use this as part of your compliance strategy. The rest is up to you to take advantage of the tools and services to make sure you meet the remaining PCI standards. Additionally, when you’re working with your PCI-DSS qualified security assessor, we can also provide an Attestation of Compliance.

For more information on compliance standards, check out


February 20, 2015

Create and Deliver Marketing or Transactional Emails

The SoftLayer email delivery service is a highly scalable, cloud-based, email relay solution. In partnership with SendGrid, an email as a service provider, SoftLayer customers are able to create and deliver marketing or transactional emails via the customer portal or SendGrid APIs.

The SoftLayer email delivery service isn’t a full corporate email solution. It’s intended as a simplified method for delivering digital marketing (e.g., newsletters and coupons) and transactional content (e.g., order confirmation, shipping notice, and password reset) to customers.


Traditionally, email is first sent through an outbound mail server that’s configured and maintained in-house, which is often costly and difficult to maintain.

With the SoftLayer email delivery service, the process is simplified; the only requirement is a connection to the Internet.

Package Comparison

The following table lists the service levels available to SoftLayer customers. The Free and Basic tiers are suitable for smaller applications with lower volume requirements. The Advanced and Enterprise levels are more suitable for larger applications and customers that require enhanced monitoring and other advanced features. Note that marketing emails are only available in the Advanced and Enterprise tiers.

Getting Started

Use the following steps to sign up for the SoftLayer email delivery service.

  1. Log on to the customer portal.
  2. Click Services, Email Delivery.
  3. Click the Order Email Delivery Service link at the top of the page.
  4. Choose your desired package, and fill out the required information. Remember for marketing emails, you must select either the Advanced or Enterprise packages.

Configuring a Marketing Email

Most of your interaction will be through the vendor portal provided by SendGrid. The following steps outline how to compose and deliver a marketing email to a list of subscribers.

  1. From the SoftLayer customer portal, navigate to Services, Email Delivery Service and click Actions, Access Vendor Portal for your desired account.
  2. Once in the SendGrid portal, click the Marketing Email link.

  1. You’ll be taken to the Marketing Email Dashboard. Click the Create a Sender Address button.
  2. Fill in the required information and click Save.
  3. Navigate back to the Marketing Email Dashboard, and click the Create Recipient List button.
  4. Enter a name for the list in the List Name field. Be sure that it’s something meaningful, such as Residential Customers.

  1. You can either Upload a list of contact emails or Add recipients manually. When adding the recipients manually, you’ll be asked verify the addresses that you enter. Click the Save button when done entering addresses.

  1. Navigate back to the Marketing Email Dashboard and click the Create Marketing Email button.
  2. Enter the title of the email in the Marketing Email Title field. Under Pick a Sender Address, select either a list or select recipients for the email. Choose your content type and how to send the email. Split Test my Marketing Email, under Choose how to send your Marketing Email, is an advanced feature that lets you send different recipients different versions of the same email—sending the different versions helps determine which version is most effective.

  1. Select the list of recipients to whom the email is to be sent and click Save.

  1. Next, select the template for the email. Options include Basic, Design, and My Saved Templates.

  1. Enter your email content. Make sure to provide a message subject.
  2. Review your email, and select when you would like it sent—Send Now, based on a Schedule, or Save As Draft. Click Finish when you’re done, or Save & Exit for a draft.

  1. You will then be brought back to the Marketing Email Dashboard where you can monitor the results of your email campaign.

Setting Up a Transactional Email

The following example shows how to integrate your app with SendGrid to send new users a welcome email. This example makes use of the SendGrid template engine, although it’s not required.

  1. From the SendGrid portal, click the Template Engine button.
  2. Click the Create Template button, enter the Template Name, and click Save.

  1. Design and modify your email and click Save when finished.

  1. Your new template should now be Active and ready to be used by the API.
  2. Click the Apps link in the top navigation bar.

  1. Click the Template Engine link on the right side of the screen.

  1. Take note of the ID of the template you just created.

  1. Use the curl utility to test your email via the SendGrid Web API.
  2. Execute the following to send a test email using your new template.

curl -d 'to=&subject="Test
subject"&text="Test Body"&from=&api_user=;api_key=

For more information on how the SoftLayer email delivery service can help you get back to your core business, check out this blog post.


Worldwide Channel Solutions Architect for SoftLayer, an IBM Company

October 16, 2013

Tips and Tricks: Troubleshooting Email Issues

Working in support, one of the most common issues we troubleshoot is a customer's ability to receive email. Depending on email server, this can be a headache and a half to figure out, but more often than not, we're able to fix the problem with one of only a few simple solutions. Because the SoftLayer Blog audience loves technical tips and tricks, I thought I'd share a few easy steps that make pinpointing the root cause of email issues much easier.

Before you gear up to go into battle, check the that server is not out of disk space on /var and that it is not in a read only state. That precursory step may seem silly, but Occam's Razor often holds true in technical troubleshooting. Once you verify that those two common problems aren't causing your email problems, the next step is to determine whether the email issues are server-wide or isolated to one mail account/domain. To do that, the first thing you need to do is make sure that the IMAP and POP services are responding.

Check IMAP and POP Services

The universal approach to checking IMAP and POP services is to use telnet:

telnet <serverip> 110
telnet <serverip> 143

If either of those commands fail, you're able to pinpoint which service to check on your server.

For most variants of Linux, you can check both services with a single command: netstat -plan|egrep -i "110|143". The resulting output will show if the services are listening and which process is doing the listening. In Windows, you can run a similar command from a command prompt: netstat -anb|find "LISTEN"| findstr "110 143".

If the ports are listening, and you're able to connect to them over telnet, your next stop should be your server's error logs.

Check Error Logs

You want to look for any mail errors that might clue you into the root cause of your email issues. In Linux, you can check /var/log/maillog, and in Windows, you can filter eventvwr.msc for mail only. If there are errors, a simple search will highlight them quickly.

If there are no errors, it's time to dig into the mail queue directly.

Check the Mail Queue

Depending on the mail server you use, the commands here are going to vary. Here are a few examples of how we'd investigate the most common mail servers we encounter:


Display the mail queue: /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qread
Display the number of messages in the queue: /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qstat
Reference article: Gaining Control Over the QMail Queue


Display the mail queue: sendmail -bp or mailq
Display the number of messages in the queue: mailq –OmaxQueueRunSize=1
Reference article: Quick Sendmail Cheatsheet


Display the mail queue: exim -bp
Display the number of messages in the queue: exim -bpc
Reference article: Exim cheatsheet


MailEnable users can can check to see that messages are moving by opening the mail directory:
Program Files\MailEnable\Queues\SMTP\Inbound\Messages
Reference article: How to diagnose inbound message delivery delays

With these commands, you can filter through the email queues to see whether any of them are for the users or domains you're having problems with. If nothing obvious presents itself at that point, it's time for some active testing.

Active Testing

Send an email to your mailserver from an external mailserver (anything will do as long as it's not on the same server). Watch for logging of the email as it's delivered:
tail -f maillog
On busy mailservers you might add |grep youremailid or simply look for a new message in the directory where the email will be stored.

The your primary goal in troubleshooting your email issues in this way is to isolate the root cause of your problem so that you can fix it more quickly. SoftLayer customers have direct access to our support team to help you through this process, but it's always nice to keep a quick reference like this in your back pocket to be able to pinpoint the problem yourself.


April 15, 2013

The Heart of SoftLayer: People

When I started working for SoftLayer as a software engineer intern, I was skeptical about the company's culture. I read many of the culture posts on the blog, and while they seemed genuine, I was still a little worried about what the work atmosphere would be for a lowly summer intern. Fast-forward almost a year, and I look back on my early concerns and laugh ... I learned quickly that the real heart of SoftLayer is its employees, and the day-to-day operations I observed in the office consistently reinforced that principle.

It's easy to think about SoftLayer as a pure technology company. We provide infrastructure as a service capabilities for businesses with on-demand provisioning and short-term contracts. Our data centers, portal, network and APIs get the spotlight, but those differentiators wouldn't exist without the teams of employees that keep improving them on a daily basis. By focusing on the company culture and making sure employees are being challenged (but not overwhelmed), SoftLayer was indirectly improving the infrastructure we provide to customers.

When I walked into the office for my first day of work, I imagined that I'd be working in a cramped, dimly lit room in the back of the building where I'd be using hand-me-down hardware. When I was led to a good-sized, well-lit room and given a Core i3 laptop with two large monitors and a full suite of software, I started realizing how silly my worries were. I had access to the fully stocked break room, and within about a week, I felt like part of a community rather than a stale workplace.

My coworkers not only made me feel welcome but would frequently go out of their way to make sure I am comfortable and have the resources I needed to succeed. While the sheer amount of new information and existing code was daunting, managers assigned projects that were possible to complete and educational. I was doing useful work building and improving a complex production system rather than the busy work offered by many other employers' internship programs. I learned several new techniques and solidified my understanding of software engineering theory through practice. The open-door policy and friendly people around me not only created a strong sense of community but also allowed more efficient problem solving.

You may have noticed early in this post that I joined the company on a summer internship and that I also told you it's been about a year since I started. While summers in Texas feel long, they don't actually last a full year ... After my internship, I was offered a part-time position as a software engineer, and I'm going to be full-time when I graduate in May.

It's next to impossible to find a company that realizes the importance of its employees and wants to provide an environment for employees to succeed. The undeniable runaway success of the company is proof that SoftLayer's approach to taking care of employees is working.


March 5, 2013

Startup Series: Kickback Tickets

The very first client I recruited to Catalyst when I joined the CommDev team about a year ago happens to be one of Catalyst's most interesting customer success stories ... and I'm not just saying that because it was the first partner I signed on. Kickback Tickets — an online ticketing platform that utilized crowdfunding — has simplified the process of creating and funding amazing events, and as a result, they've made life a lot easier for the startup, developer and networking organizations that fuel Catalsyt.

Anyone who's organized events knows that it often involves a financial risk because it's hard to know whether the event will be well-enough attended to cover the costs of putting on the event. With Kickback Tickets, an event is listed an funded ahead of time, and when it reaches its "Tipping Point" goal of tickets ordered, it's completely funded, the early supporters are charged, and the ticket sales continue.

The process is simple:

Kickback Tickets

Event updates, guest registrations and QR-coded tickets are provided to attendees to make check-in seamless, so the hosts of each event don't have hassle with those details. Kickback's revenue comes from a small fee on each ticket for each successfully funded event, and they've got a ton of momentum. After signing on with Catalyst in March 2012, Kickback went live with an open beta in November 2012, and they launched their out-of-beta site in February 2013. They've successfully funded more than 20 events, and new events are added daily.

Kickback Tickets

When I met the Kickback founders Jonathan Perkins and Julian Balderas, I was attending SF Beta (my first official event as a SLayer). At the time, Jonathan and Julian were a couple of bankers with an innovative idea to help organizations alleviate the financial risk of planning and putting on events by enlisting community support. I told them about my experience as the COO of a small non-profit startup up called Slavery Footprint (also a Catalyst partner), and I guess they could relate to the challenges SoftLayer helped us overcome because they were excited to join.

In their own words, Jonathan and Julian explain that their partnership with Softlayer and the Catalyst program has been extremely valuable:

SoftLayer provides a rock-solid technical foundation and allows us to focus more resources on business development. On the technical side, what Softlayer offers is impressive — super fast speeds and an intricate level of control over the hardware. On the personal side, the mentorship and networking benefits of the program have been very helpful. We've always found the Catalyst team to be available to chat about any questions we had, ranging from development to biz dev to fundraising.

As they continue to expand their platform, it's going to be exciting to watch Kickback become a true force in the events space. Organize your next event with Kickback and make sure it's a success.

Oh, and if you want to speak to Jonathan and Julian, just reach out to me and I'll happily make the introduction.


November 20, 2012

Community Development: Catalysing European Startups

SoftLayer works hard and plays hard. A few weeks ago, I traveled to Dallas for the first "Global Catalyst Summit"* where the community development teams in Europe, Asia and the United States all came together under one roof to learn, strategize and bond. What that really means is that we all experienced a week of hardcore information flow and brutal fun.

The onboarding process to become a part of the SoftLayer's Community Development (Catalyst) team is pretty rigorous, and traveling to Dallas from Amsterdam for the training made it even more intense. In short order, I learned about the roots of the Catalyst program and why SoftLayer is so interested in investing in helping startups succeed. I got the low-down on the hundreds of companies that are taking advantage of the program right now, and I was inspired by the six incredible people who focus exclusively on the Catalyst program at SoftLayer ... And Big Tex:

SoftLayer Community Development Team and Big Tex

When the whirlwind week of orientation and training came to an end, I came to a solid conclusion: I am working at SoftLayer for a reason. I believe SoftLayer has the most kick-ass global on-demand technology platform out there, and our focus on innovation and automation is reflected in everything we do. On top of that, we give that platform to startups to help springboard their success. I get to work with a community of world-changers. Needless to say, that's an amazing conclusion to come to.

As a member of the Catalyst team in EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa), I can provide signficant resources to entrepreneurs who are building awesome new applications and technologies that are making a difference locally, regionally and globally. Anna Bofill Bert and I work out of SoftLayer's Amsterdam office, and we are fully dedicated to helping startup and developer communities in our region.

As a review exercise and a way to educate the audience that may be unfamiliar with Catalyst, I thought I'd bullet out a few of the main ideas:

What is Catalyst?

The SoftLayer Catalyst Startup Program provides:

  • A generous monthly hosting credit toward dedicated, cloud or hybrid compute environments for a FULL YEAR (Ideal for dev-ops/next generation startup compute applications who want high performance from the start).
  • Direct connection to highest level programming team at SoftLayer — Our Innovation Team. Participating companies get help and advice from the people that are writing the book on highly scalable, global infrastructure environments.
  • Connection to the SoftLayer Marketing and PR Team for help getting spreading the word around the world about all the cool stuff participating startups are doing.

We reach startups by listening to them and meeting needs that all of them express. We are telling the SoftLayer story, networking, making friends, drinking too much and travelling like mad. In the course of a month, we went to Lean Start Up Machine in Rotterdam, Structure Europe in Amsterdam, Pioneers Festival in Vienna, HowToWeb in Bucharest and we managed to complete a quick tour of startup communities in Spain.

Like our peers on the US team, we partner with incubators and accelerators to make sure that when startups look for help getting started, they also find SoftLayer. We're already working with partners like Springboard, Seedcamp, GameFounders, Startup Sauna, the INLEA Foundation and Tetuan Valley, and the list of supported communities seems to grow daily. When the portfolio companies in each of these organizations are given access to the Catalyst program, that means SoftLayer's Catalyst customer base is growing pretty phenomenally as well.

What I actually like most about how we help startups is the mentorship and office hours we provide participating companies as well. SoftLayer was founded by ten guys in a living room in 2005, and we've got hundreds of millions of dollars in annual revenue as of 2012. That success is what the SoftLayer team is excited to share insights about.

Hustling is a major part of startup culture, so it's only fitting that I feel like I had to hustle through this blog to get all of my thoughts down. Given that SoftLayer EMEA is a bit of a startup itself, I'm happy to be practicing what we preach. If you'd like more information about Catalyst or you want to apply, please feel free to hit me up:

We want to be part of your company's success story.


*Note: As an homage to Big Tex after the fire, we referred to our meeting as the "Global Catalyst Summit with Big Tex" at the Texas State Fair. We hope to see you back in action in 2013, Big Tex!

October 25, 2012

Tips from the Abuse Department: Save Your Sinking Ship

I often find that the easiest way to present a complex process is with a relatable analogy. By replacing esoteric technical details with a less intimidating real-world illustration, smart people don't have to be technically savvy to understand what's going on. When it comes to explaining abuse-related topics, I find analogies especially helpful. One that I'm particularly keen on in explaining Abuse tickets in the context of a sinking ship.

How many times have you received an Abuse ticket and responded to the issue by suspending what appears to be the culprit account? You provide an update in the ticket, letting our team know that you've "taken care of the problem," and you consider it resolved. A few moments later, the ticket is updated on our end, and an abuse administrator is asking follow-up questions: "How did the issue occur?" "What did you do to resolve the issue?" "What steps are being taken to secure the server in order to prevent further abuse?"

Who cares how the issue happened if it's resolved now, right? Didn't I respond quickly and address the problem in the ticket? What gives? Well, dear readers, it's analogy time:

You're sailing along in a boat filled with important goods, and the craft suddenly begins to take on water. It's not readily apparent where the water is coming from, but you have a trusty bucket that you fill with the water in the boat and toss over the side. When you toss out all the water onboard, is the problem fixed? Perhaps. Perhaps not.

You don't see evidence of the problem anymore, but as you continue along your way, your vessel might start riding lower and lower in the water — jeopardizing yourself and your shipment. If you were to search for the cause of the water intake and take steps to patch it, the boat would be in a much better condition to deliver you and your cargo safely to your destination.

In the same way that a hull breach can sink a ship, so too can a security hole on your server cause problems for your (and your clients') data. In the last installment of "Tips from the Abuse Department," Andrew explained some of the extremely common (and often overlooked) ways servers are compromised and used maliciously. As he mentioned in his post, Abuse tickets are, in many cases, the first notification for many of our customers that "something's wrong."

At a crucial point like this, it's important to get the water out of the boat AND prevent the vessel from taking on any more water. You won't be sailing smoothly unless both are done as quickly as possible.

Let's look at an example of what thorough response to an Abuse ticket might look like:

A long-time client of yours hosts their small business site on one of your servers. You are notified by Abuse that malware is being distributed from a random folder on their domain. You could suspend the domain and be "done" with the issue, but that long-time client (who's not in the business of malware distribution) would suffer. You decide to dig deeper.

After temporarily suspending the account to stop any further malware distribution, you log into the server and track down the file and what permissions it has. You look through access logs and discover that the file was uploaded via FTP just yesterday from an IP in another country. With this IP information, you search your logs and find several other instances where suspicious files were uploaded around the same time, and you see that several FTP brute force attempts were made against the server.

You know what happened: Someone (or something) scanned the server and attempted to break into the domain. When the server was breached, malware was uploaded to an obscure directory on the domain where the domain owners might not notice it.

With this information in hand, you can take steps to protect your clients and the server itself. The first step might be to implement a password policy that would make guessing passwords very difficult. Next, you might add a rule within your FTP configuration to block continued access after a certain number of failed logins. Finally, you would clean the malicious content from the server, reset the compromised passwords, and unsuspend the now-clean site.

While it's quite a bit more work than simply identifying the domain and account responsible for the abuse and suspending it, the extra time you spent investigating the cause of the issue will prevent the same issue from happening after your client "fixes" the problem by deleting the files/directories. Invariably, they'd get compromised again in the same way when the domain is restored, and you'd hear from the Abuse department again.

Server security goes hand in hand with systems administration, and even though it's not a very fun part of the job, it is a 24/7 responsibility that requires diligence and vigilance. By investing time and effort into securing your servers and fixing your hull breach rather than just bailing water overboard, your customers will see less downtime, you'll be using your server resources more efficiently, and (best of all) you won't have the Abuse team hounding you about more issues!


P.S. I came up with a brilliant analogy about DNS and the postal service, so that might be a topic for my next post ...

September 17, 2012

Joining the Internet Infrastructure Coalition

In January, we posted a series of blogs about legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate that would have had a serious impact on the hosting industry. We talked about SOPA and PIPA, and how those proposed laws would "break the Internet" as we know it. The hosting industry rallied together to oppose the passage of those bills, and in doing so, we proved to be a powerful collective force.

In the months that followed the shelving of SOPA and PIPA, many of the hosting companies that were active in the fight were invited to join a new coalition that would focus on proposed legislation that affects Internet infrastructure providers ... The Internet Infrastructure Coalition (or "i2Coalition") was born. i2Coalition co-founder and Board Chair Christian Dawson explains the basics:

SoftLayer is proud to be a Charter Member of i2Coalition, and we're excited to see how many vendors, partners, peers and competitors have joined us. Scrolling the ranks of founding members is a veritable "Who's who?" of the companies that make up the "nuts and bolts" of the Internet.

The goal of i2Coalition is to facilitate public policy education and advocacy, develop market-driven standards formed by consensus and give the industry a unified voice. On the i2Coalition's Public Policy page, that larger goal is broken down into focused priorities, with the first being

"In all public policy initiatives of the i2Coalition will be to encourage the growth and development of the Internet infrastructure industry and to protect the interests of members of the Coalition consistent with this development."

Another huge priority worth noting is the focus on enabling and promoting the free exercise of human rights — including freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and the protection of personal privacy. Those rights are essential to fostering effective Internet advancement and to maintain a free and open Internet, and SoftLayer is a strong supporter of that platform.

If you operate in the hosting or Internet infrastructure space and you want to be part of the i2Coalition, we encourage you to become a member and join the conversation. When policymakers are talking about getting "an Internet" from their staff members, we know that there are plenty of opportunities to educate and provide context on the technical requirements and challenges that would result from proposed legislation, and the Internet Infrastructure Coalition is well equipped to capitalize on those opportunities.


August 15, 2012

Managing Support Tickets: Email Subscriptions

This week, the development team rolled out some behind-the-scenes support functionality that I think a lot of our customers will want to take advantage of, so I put together this quick blog post to spread the word about it. With the new release, the support department is able to create "Ticket Email Subscriptions" for different ticket groups on every customer account. As a customer, you might not be jumping up and down with joy after reading that one-sentence description, but after you hear a little more about the functionality, if you're not clapping, I hope you'll at least give us a thumbs-up.

To understand the utility of the new ticket email subscription functionality, let's look at how normal tickets work in the SoftLayer portal without email subscriptions:

User Creates Ticket

  1. User A creates a ticket.
  2. User A becomes the owner of that ticket.
  3. When SoftLayer responds to the ticket, an email notification is sent to User A to let him/her know that the ticket has been updated.

SoftLayer Creates Ticket

  1. SoftLayer team creates a ticket on a customer's account.
  2. The primary customer contact on the account is notified of the new ticket.
  3. Customer logs into the portal and responds to ticket.
  4. Customer gets notifications of updates (as described above).

There's nothing wrong with the existing support notification process, but that doesn't mean there aren't ways to make the process better. What if User A creates an urgent ticket on his/her way out the door to go on vacation? User B and User C aren't notified when an update is posted on User A's ticket, so the other users aren't able to get to the ticket and respond as quickly as they would have if they received the notification. What if the primary customer contact on the account isn't the best person to receive a monitoring alert? The administrator who will investigate the monitoring alert has to see the new ticket on the account or hear about it from the primary contact (who got the notification).

Ticket email subscriptions allow for customers to set contact addresses to be notified when a ticket is created, edited or moved in a particular ticket group. Here are the ticket groups differentiated in our initial release:

  • Billing - Any ticket in our Billing department
  • Maintenance - Scheduled maintenance notifications for specific servers
  • Network Protection - DDoS mitigation and Null Routes
  • Monitoring - Host Down Alerts
  • CST, SysAdmin and Hardware - Any ticket in our support and data center departments
  • Managed Services - Tickets that relate to any managed services
  • Network Maintenance - Scheduled network maintenance

You'll notice that Abuse isn't included in this list, and the only reason it's omitted is because you've always been able to designate a contact on your account for abuse-related tickets ... Ticket subscriptions extend that functionality to other ticket groups.

Because only one email address can be "subscribed" to notifications in each ticket group, we recommend that customers use their own distribution lists as the email contacts. With a DL as the contact, you can enable multiple users in your organization to receive notifications, and you can add and remove users from each distribution list on your end quickly and easily.

When User A creates a ticket with the data center and goes on vacation, as soon as SoftLayer responds to the ticket, User A will be notified (as usual), and the distribution will get notified as well. When a network maintenance is ticket is created by SoftLayer, the distribution will be notified.

Ticket email subscriptions are additive to the current update notification structure, and they are optional. If you want to set up ticket email subscriptions on your account, create a ticket for the support department and provide us with the email addresses you'd like to subscribe to each of the ticket groups.

We hope this tool helps provide an even better customer experience for you ... If you don't mind, I'm going to head back to the lab to work with the dev team to cook up more ways to add flexibility and improvements into the customer experience.


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