Posts Tagged 'Virtual Servers'

August 12, 2016

How to Get More Than 8TB of Storage on SoftLayer VMs

“How do I get more than 8TB of storage on my virtual server?” This is a common question I'm asked when talking to potential SoftLayer customers and partners. There are two storage options from which you can choose when ordering a SoftLayer virtual server:

Local storage, which has a smaller maximum capacity of 25GB or 100GB as the first disk, and up to 300GB on the second disk. The maximum space limits are due to the storage being located on the host for the virtual server, which has limited space.

SAN storage, which comes in the same sizes for the first disk as local storage (25GB or 100GB). You can, however, have up to four additional disk drives at 2TB each, totaling up to 8TB.

So far, I’ve only laid out what you already know, but there is a way to get up to 12TB LUNs for your SoftLayer virtual servers by using one of our file or block storage classes: performance and endurance.

Performance

Performance is a class of SoftLayer block and file storage that is designed to support high I/O applications requiring predictable levels of performance. This predictable performance is achieved through the allocation of protocol-level IOPS to individual volumes. IOPS ranging from 100 through 6,000 can be provisioned with storage sizes that range from 20GB to 12TB. You select the appropriate storage size and IOPS required during provisioning.

Endurance

Endurance is available in three IOPS performance tiers to support varying application needs. Note: Once provisioned, you cannot migrate between tiers.

  • 00.25 IOPS per GB: Designed for workloads with low I/O intensity. These workloads are typically characterized by having a large percentage of data inactive at a given time. Example applications include storing mailboxes or departmental level file shares.
  • 2 IOPS per GB: Designed for most general purpose usage. Example applications include hosting small databases backing web applications or virtual machine disk images for a hypervisor.
  • 4 IOPS per GB: Designed for higher-intensity workloads. These workloads are typically characterized by having a high percentage of data active at a given time. Example applications include transactional and other performance-sensitive databases.

The figure below illustrates how the virtual server will utilize the storage. You connect to the machine via the public network and pass through the firewall, which is provisioned separately. The storage is attached to the virtual server via the SoftLayer private network, meaning that storage can only be accessed through the virtual server that has been authorized to use it.

Endurance and performance storage classes on SoftLayer

You can find the provisioning guide for block and file storage here. Once your hosts are authorized, you can now connect the virtual server to your block or file storage class. Click here to connect block storage for Windows, here for block storage for Linux, and here for file storage on Linux.

-Kevin O’Shea

Categories: 
June 16, 2016

Larger Virtual Servers Now Available

You asked. We listened. We’re excited to announce that our clients can now provision virtual servers with more cores and more RAM.

Starting today, you’re now empowered to run high compute and in-memory intensive workloads on a public and private cloud with the same quick deployment and flexibility you’ve come to enjoy from SoftLayer. After all, you shouldn’t have to choose between flexibility and power.

Oh, and did we mention it’s all on demand? Deploy these new, larger sizes rapidly and start innovating—right now.

Whether you require a real-time analytics platform for healthcare, financial, or retail, these larger virtual servers provide the capabilities you need to harness and maximize analytics-driven solutions.

Popular use cases for larger virtual servers include real-time big data analytics solutions requiring millisecond execution as needed by organizations processing massive amounts of data, like weather companies. Given the immense amount of meteorological inputs required for any location, at any time, at millisecond speed, larger virtual server sizes power weather forecast responses in real-time.

With SoftLayer virtual servers, you can segment your data across public, private, and management networks for better reliability and speed. You get unmetered bandwidth across our private and management networks at no additional charge, and unmetered inbound bandwidth on our public network. As real-time data-intensive workloads are developed, SoftLayer ensures that our best-in-class network infrastructure can retrieve and move data with speed.

New Sizes

Drum roll, please! Our newest offerings include:

Public virtual servers

Private virtual servers

Public virtual servers will be customizable, but will have limitations on various core/RAM ratios. Private nodes will provide complete customization.

With the introduction of larger virtual servers, SoftLayer will also reconfigure socket/core ratios. The number of cores per socket is reflected below for newly deployed virtual servers:

Core:Socket Ratios

For clients using third-party software on virtual servers, it is recommended that you work with your software vendor to ensure socket-based licensing is properly licensed. 

Data Center Availability

Currently, larger public and private virtual servers will only be available in select data centers, with more coming online in the near future. The following locations will offer public and private virtual server combinations configured with more than 16 cores or more than 64 GB RAM:

Locations of larger public and private virtual servers

For more information on virtual servers and for pricing, read here.

We are always interested to see how you are flying in the cloud and how these larger virtual servers help drive value for your business. Please connect with us on Twitter: @milan3patel and @conradjjohnson.

-Milan Patel

Categories: 
December 30, 2015

Using Ansible on SoftLayer to Streamline Deployments

Many companies today are leveraging new tools to automate deployments and handle configuration management. Ansible is a great tool that offers flexibility when creating and managing your environments.

SoftLayer has components built within the Ansible codebase, which means continued support for new features as the Ansible project expands. You can conveniently pull your SoftLayer inventory and work with your chosen virtual servers using the Core Ansible Library along with the SoftLayer Inventory Module. Within your inventory list, your virtual servers are grouped by various traits, such as “all virtual servers with 32GB of RAM,” or “all virtual servers with a domain name of softlayer.com.” The inventory list provides different categorized groups that can be expanded upon. With the latest updates to the SoftLayer Inventory Module, you can now get a list of virtual servers by tags, as well as work with private virtual servers. You can then use each of the categories provided by the inventory list within your playbooks.

So, how can you work with the new categories (such as tags) if you don’t yet have any inventory or a deployed infrastructure within SoftLayer? You can use the new SoftLayer module that’s been added to the Ansible Extras Project. This module provides the ability to provision virtual servers within a playbook. All you have to do is supply the build detail information for your virtual server(s) within your playbook and go.

Let’s look at an example playbook. You’ll want to specify a hostname along with a domain name when defining the parameters for your virtual server(s). The hostname can have an incremental number appended at the end of it if you’re provisioning more than one virtual server; e.g., Hostname-1, Hostname-2, and so on. You just need to specify a value True for the parameter increment. Incremental naming offers the ability to uniquely name virtual servers within your playbook, but is also optional in the case where you want similar hostnames. Notice that you can also specify tags for your virtual servers, which is handy when working with your inventory in future playbooks.

Following is a sample playbook for building Ubuntu virtual servers on SoftLayer:

---
- name: Build Tomcat Servers
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: False
  tasks:
  - name: Build Servers
    local_action:
      module: softlayer
      quantity: 2
      increment: True
      hostname: www
      domain: test.com
      datacenter: mex01
      tag: tomcat-test
      hourly: True
      private: False
      dedicated: False
      local_disk: True
      cpus: 1
      memory: 1024
      disks: [25]
      os_code: UBUNTU_LATEST
      ssh_keys: [12345]

By default, your playbook will pause until each of your virtual servers completes provisioning before moving onto the next plays within your playbook. You can specify the wait parameter to False if you choose not to wait for the virtual servers to complete provisioning. The wait parameter is helpful for when you want to build many virtual servers, but some have different characteristics such as RAM or tag naming. You can also set the maximum time you want to wait on the virtual servers by setting the wait_timeout parameter, which takes an integer defining the number of seconds to wait.

Once you’re finished using your virtual servers, canceling them is as easy as creating them. Just specify a new playbook step with a state of absent, as well as specifying the virtual server ID or tags to know which virtual servers to cancel.

The following example will cancel all virtual servers on the account with a tag of tomcat-test:

- name: Cancel Servers
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: False
  tasks:
  - name: Cancel by tag
    local_action:
      module: softlayer
      state: absent
      tag: tomcat-test

New features are being developed with the core inventory library to bring additional functionality to Ansible on SoftLayer. These new developments can be found by following the Core Ansible Project hosted on Github. You can also follow the Ansible Extras Project for updates to the SoftLayer module.

As of this blog post, the new SoftLayer module is still pending inclusion into the Ansible Extras Project. Click here to check out the current pull request for the latest code and samples.

-Matt

May 14, 2015

Update - VENOM Vulnerability

Yesterday, a security advisory designated CVE-2015-3456 / XSA-133 was publicly announced. The advisory identified a vulnerability, which has become commonly known as "VENOM", through which an attacker could exploit floppy driver support in QEMU to escalate their privileges.

SoftLayer engineers, in concert with our technology partners, completed a deep analysis of the vulnerability and determined that SoftLayer virtual servers are not affected by this issue.

We're always committed to ensuring our customers' operations and data are well protected. If customers have any questions or concerns, don't hesitate to reach out to SoftLayer support or your direct SoftLayer contacts.

-Sonny

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