Posts Tagged 'Vmware'

November 4, 2015

Shared, scalable, and resilient storage without SAN

Storage area networks (SAN) are used most often in the enterprise world. In many enterprises, you will see racks filled with these large storage arrays. They are mainly used to provide a centralized storage platform with limited scalability. They require special training to operate, are expensive to purchase, support, or expand, and if those devices fail, there is big trouble.

Some people might say SAN devices are a necessary evil. But are they really necessary? Aren’t there alternatives?

Most startups nowadays are running their services on commodity hardware, with smart software to distribute their content across server farms globally. Current, well established, and successful companies that run websites or apps like Whatsapp, Facebook, or LinkedIn continue to operate pretty much the same way they started. They need the ability to scale and perform at unpredictable rates all around the world, so they use commodity hardware combined with smart software. These types of companies need the features that SAN storage offers them—but with more scalable, global resiliency, and without being centralized or having to buy expensive hardware. But how do they provide server access to the same data, and how do they avoid data loss?

The answer is actually quite simple, although its technology is quite sophisticated: distributed storage.

In a world where virtualization has become a standard for most companies, where even applications and networking are being virtualized, virtualization giant VMware answers this question with Virtual SAN. It effectively eliminates the need for SAN hardware in a VMware environment (and it will also be available for purchase from SoftLayer before the end of the year). Other similar distributed products are GlusterFS (also offered in our QuantaStor solution), Ceph, Microsoft Windows DFS, Hadoop HDFS, document-oriented databases like MongoDB, and many more.

Many solutions, however, vary in maturity. Object storage is a great example of a new type of storage that has come to market, which doesn’t require SAN devices. With SoftLayer, you can and may run them all.

When you have bare metal servers set up as hypervisors or application servers, it’s likely you have a lot of drive bays within those servers, mostly unused. Stuffing them with hard drives and allowing the software to distribute your data across multiple servers in multiple locations with two or three replicas will result in a big, safe, fast, and distributed storage platform. For such a platform, scaling it would be just adding more bare metal servers with even more hard drives and letting the software handle the rest.

Nowadays we are seeing more and more hardware solutions like SAN—or even networking—being replaced with smarter software on simpler and more affordable hardware. At SoftLayer, we offer month-to-month and hourly bare metal servers with up to 36 drive bays, potentially providing a lot of room for storage. With 10Gbps global connectivity options, we offer fast, low latency networking for syncing between servers and delivering data to the customer.


November 2, 2015

The multitenant problem solver is here: VMWare 6 NSX on SoftLayer

We’re very excited to tell you about what’s coming down the pike here at SoftLayer: VMWare NSX 6! This is something that I’ve personally been anticipating for a while now, because it solves so many issues that are confronted on the multitenant platform. Here’s a diagram to explain exactly how it works:

As you can see, it uses the SoftLayer network, the underlay network and fabric, and uses NSX as the overlay network to create the SDN (Software Defined Network).

What is it?
VMware NSX is a virtual networking and security software product from VMware's vCloud Networking and Security (vCNS) and Nicira Network Virtualization Platform (NVP). NSX software-defined networking is part of VMware's software-defined data center concept, which offers cloud computing on VMware virtualization technologies. VMware's stated goal with NSX is to provision virtual networking environments without command line interfaces or other direct administrator intervention. Network virtualization abstracts network operations from the underlying hardware onto a distributed virtualization layer, much like server virtualization does for processing power and operating systems. VMware vCNS (formerly called vShield) virtualizes L4-L7 of the network. Nicira's NVP virtualizes the network fabric, L2 and L3. VMware says that NSX will expose logical firewalls, switches, routers, ports, and other networking elements to allow virtual networking among vendor-agnostic hypervisors, cloud management systems, and associated network hardware. It also will support external networking and security ecosystem services.

How does it work?
NSX network virtualization is an architecture that enables the full potential of a software-defined data center (SDDC), making it possible to create and run entire networks in parallel on top of existing network hardware. This results in faster deployment of workloads and greater agility in creating dynamic data centers.

This means you can create a flexible pool of network capacity that can be allocated, utilized, and repurposed on demand. You can decouple the network from underlying hardware and apply virtualization principles to network infrastructure. You’re able to deploy networks in software that are fully isolated from each other, as well as from other changes in the data center. NSX reproduces the entire networking environment in software, including L2, L3 and L4–L7 network services within each virtual network. NSX offers a distributed logical architecture for L2–L7 services, provisioning them programmatically when virtual machines are deployed and moving them with the virtual machines. With NSX, you already have the physical network resources you need for a next-generation data center.

What are some major features?
NSX brings an SDDC approach to network security. Its network virtualization capabilities enable the three key functions of micro-segmentation: isolation (no communication across unrelated networks), segmentation (controlled communication within a network), and security with advanced services (tight integration with leading third-party security solutions).

The key benefits of micro-segmentation include:

  1. Network security inside the data center: Fine-grained policies enable firewall controls and advanced security down to the level of the virtual NIC.
  2. Automated security for speed and agility in the data center: Security policies are automatically applied when a virtual machine spins up, moved when a virtual machine is migrated, and removed when a virtual machine is deprovisioned—eliminating the problem of stale firewall rules.
  3. Integration with the industry’s leading security products: NSX provides a platform for technology partners to bring their solutions to the SDDC. With NSX security tags, these solutions can adapt to constantly changing conditions in the data center for enhanced security.

As you can see, there are lots of great features and benefits for our customers.

You can find more great resources about NSX on SoftLayer here. Make sure to keep your eyes peeled for more great NSX news!


October 20, 2015

What’s in a hypervisor? More than you think

Virtualization has always been a key tenet of enabling cloud-computing services. From the get-go, SoftLayer has offered a variety of options, including Citrix XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V, and Parallels Cloud Server, just to name a few. It’s all about enabling choice.

But what about VMware—the company that practically pioneered virtualization, making it commonplace?

Well, we have some news to share. SoftLayer has always supported VMware ESX and ESXi—your basic, run-of-the mill hypervisor—but now we’re enabling enterprise customers to run VMware vSphere on our bare metal servers.

This collaboration is significant for SoftLayer and IBM because it gives our customers tremendous flexibility and transparency when moving workloads into the public cloud. Enterprises already familiar with VMware can easily extend their existing on-premises VMware infrastructure into the IBM Cloud with simplified, monthly pricing. This makes transitioning into a hybrid model easier because it results in greater workload mobility and application continuity.

But the real magic happens when you couple our bare metal performance with VMware vSphere. Users can complete live workload migrations between data centers across continents. Users can easily move and implement enterprise applications and disaster recovery solutions across our global network of cloud data centers—with just a few clicks of a mouse. Take a look at this demo and judge for yourself.

What’s in a hypervisor? For some, it’s an on-ramp to the cloud and a way to make hybrid computing a reality. When you pair the flexibility of VMware with our bare metal servers, users get a combination that’s hard to beat.

We’re innovating to help companies make the transition to hybrid cloud, one hypervisor at a time. For more details, visit

-Jack Beech, VP of Business Development

October 19, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 17

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

We’re in India.
We’ve finally arrived! Our first Indian data center is now open in Chennai. The new data center will allow us to grow our cloud footprint with a direct connection between Europe and Asia through India. It will also offer “local customers and end users increased performance and speed for data traveling to and from the region.

Along with the data center, IBM announced a new partnership with the National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM) to launch Robert LeBlanc, senior vice president of IBM Cloud said, “With the opening of the IBM Cloud data center in Chennai and our collaboration with NASSCOM, IBM is not only delivering greater access to a globally integrated cloud data center that offers the performance and speed needed, but it is also creating the foundation for future growth by working with NASSCOM 10,000 Startups program to equip local developers with the skills they need to grow the market.”

What’s up with Watson?
Watson Analytics now offers even more resources to users. IBM announced the introduction of new data discovery and Q&A capabilities that will allow users to more easily gather knowledge from their data.

IBM also introduced its newest tool, Expert Storybooks. Expert Storybooks will guide users in understanding, learning, and reasoning with different types of data sources to uncover the most relevant facts and reveal patterns and relationships for predictive decision making. Find more information about the types of Storybooks here.

You’re only a couple of clicks away from hybrid cloud.
Our public cloud is being integrated with VMware’s virtualization stack. This will allow current VMware customers to build hybrid clouds with just a few clicks. Geoff Waters, vice president of Service Provider Channel at VMware, said, “This partnership provides enterprises with a proven cloud platform on a global basis with high performance, enhanced security and control by using technologies from SoftLayer and VMware. The ability to move workloads across continents offers enterprises new and exciting deployment options for their applications and cloud services.” Get more information about the partnership here.


January 25, 2008

Virtualized Virtualization

For the past several months, we have been struggling with how to implement virtualization in a hosting environment. Xen, VMWare, Virtuozzo, Parrallels, and Virtual Iron just to name a few. As many of you know, the software world courts the enterprise and the hosting world is left to shove the square peg into a round hole. Once again, these software packages have been designed for one company with many servers versus one company with many clients with many servers.

The most shocking reality about virtualization is the lack of scalability. Now, before you call quack shack to have my head examined – hear me out. All (and I mean all) of the virtualization products on the market scale extremely well to a couple hundred physical servers (lets call it 200). These technologies were designed to be used in companies that have relatively small subsets of physical servers (yes…I think 200 is small) managed through a centralized console. The idea is – those 200 servers should be utilized more efficiently thereby creating 400 to 2000 virtual machines. This model works great in companies that only have the need for one or two mass “virtual deployments.”

Now, fast forward to SoftLayer where we have already virtualized every aspect of the datacenter and we manage over 12,000 servers. Let’s run through the high points of virtualization - Rapid deployment – we got that. Asset tracking – yip, been there done that. Network management – baked and done. Add services on-the-fly – is there any other way? Complete control – piece of cake. Eliminate inefficiencies – have you seen our offerings? In essence, SoftLayer has abstracted the physical layer from the datacenter and left our customers with a complete virtualized datacenter environment. So, the questions remains – how do we virtualize the virtualized?


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