Posts Tagged 'WAR'

July 6, 2009

The Cure for Irrelevance

I’ve been feeling rather irrelevant lately……yeah, yeah, I know . Watch out, because when lawyers feel irrelevant we sue!

Anyway, just thinking about the things going on in the rest of the world, like the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We have men and women over there who are still dying and losing their sanity on a daily basis, but for those of us who don’t have anyone close to us involved in the wars, it’s become a low hum…car bomb, soldier killed, hum, hum. But then I think of the daily terror that those who have loved ones go through – did she have to go out on patrol today? Did she get hurt? Did she get killed? Every day, every hour spent wondering if that person is safe and will come home again. That soldier is not irrelevant – he is making the greatest sacrifice so we can go on with our safe, secure lives over here.

My thoughts also turn to the people of Iran, and I find myself thinking: “If I lived in a repressive regime, would I be out on the streets in defiance of the government and particularly with the threat of being beaten, jailed or disappearing from the face of the earth?” I like to think I would, but I don’t know the answer, and that feeds my irrelevance. And come on Iran; give your people some credit. Make it at least look like the election wasn’t predetermined. You declare a landslide victory for Ahmadinejad (cut and paste, baby, cut and paste!) mere minutes after the polls close, yet the ballots are supposed to be hand counted. How can that work? I mean, wait an hour or so – pretend you counted. Please! Are the people of Iran irrelevant? No, they are making the greatest sacrifice in a battle for freedom, and in an uprising that may very well change the course of their history. The world is watching.

So how do I become relevant? (Assuming, that is, that a lawyer can ever be relevant). How do SLayers and SLackers become relevant? We go that extra mile. We’ve been dealing with cranky clients all day – keep the smile on the face and in the voice and treat them like they’ve just put in an order for 300+ servers a month. We don’t remain satisfied with the status quo – figure out how to make our system and services better, stronger, faster. We don’t rest on our laurels because we just had a major release, i.e., Cloudlayer instances. We look ahead and figure out or invent the next new thing our customers need or want. We scan the forums to keep a pulse on our clients (and it’s usually good for an eye-roll or two). We keep Lance and Mike out of trouble.

So am I like a U.S. soldier or the Iranian people? Not so much, but I can do things to stay relevant in my own little world.

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November 19, 2007

A Feature Too Far

I just finished the best Software Project Management book I have ever read. It covered proper planning, requirements gathering, resource management, inter-organizational communication, and even discussed the immeasurable factor of individual effort. The book's title is 'A Bridge too Far' by Cornelius Ryan. The book is actually a historical account of "Operation Market-Garden" which was an attack by the Allied forces against Nazi Germany in World War II.

First let me say that I am not comparing Software Development to War. I do appreciate the difference between losing one's job and losing one's life. But as I was reading the book, the parallels between the job of a project manager preparing for, managing, and executing a large project are not unlike that of the job of a General's planning staff preparing for a major offensive.

Operation Market-Garden was a combined ground and paratrooper attack into The Netherlands by the Allies a few months after the invasion of Normandy. Things seemed to be going well for the Allies in the months after D-Day and the Allied Generals became confident that they could launch a lightening strike that would end the war sooner rather than later. The operation seemed simple, Airborne paratroopers would be dropped deep in Nazi territory and would capture key bridges along a route into The Netherlands. A ground offensive would quickly follow using the bridges that were captured by the paratroopers to get almost all the way to Germany's borders. The short version of the story is that the ground offensive never caught up to the paratroopers and the offensive didn't succeed.

Reading the historical account, with the benefit of hindsight, it became obvious that the Allied Generals underestimated the difficulty of the task. The offensive scope was too big for the resources on hand and perfect execution of all the individual engagements was required. The schedule the Generals developed was impossible to keep and schedule slips meant death for many of the soldiers. Communications between elements of the units involved was critical but did not occur. However, because of heroic actions of some individuals and personal sacrifice of many, the offensive almost succeeded.

In the early stages of a project, setting realistic goals, and not putting on blinders as to the quantity and quality of your resources are key to a projects success. Going on the assumptions that the 'development weather' will always be perfect, communications will always work, and that all tasks will be completed on schedule is a recipe for disaster. And you can't always plan on individual heroics to save a project.

I usually try to inject some levity into my posts, but not this one. 17,000 Allied soldiers, 13,000 German soldiers, and 10,000 civilians were killed, missing, or wounded as a result of this failed offensive.

-@nday91

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