Posts Tagged 'WHM'

July 14, 2015

Preventative Maintenance and Backups

Has your cPanel server ever gone down only to not come back online because the disk failed?

At SoftLayer, data migration is in the hands of our customers. That means you must save your data and move it to a new server. Well, thanks to a lot of slow weekends, I’ve had time to write a bash script that automates the process for you. It’s been tested in a dev environment of my own working with the data center to simulate the dreaded DRS (data retention service) when a drive fails and in a live environment to see what new curveballs could happen. In this three-part series, we’ll discuss how to do server preventative maintenance to prevent a total disaster, how to restore your backed up data (if you have backups), and finally we’ll go over the script itself to fully automate a process to backup, move, and restore all of your cPanel data safely (if the prior two aren’t options for you).

Let’s start off with some preventative maintenance first and work on setting up backups in WHM itself.

First thing you’ll need to do is log into your WHM, and then go to Home >> Backup >> Backup Configuration. You will probably have an information box at the top that says “The legacy backups system is currently disabled;” that’s fine, let it stay disabled. The legacy backup system is going away soon anyway, and the newer system allows for more customization. If you haven’t clicked “Enable” under the Global Settings, now would be the time to do so, so that the rest of the page becomes visible. Now, you should be able to modify the rest of the backup configuration, so let’s start with the type.

In my personal opinion, compressed is the only way to go. Yes, it takes longer, but uses less disk space in the end. Uncompressed uses up too much space, but it’s faster. Incremental is also not a good choice, as it only allows for one backup and it does not allow for users to include additional destinations.

The next section is scheduling and retention, and, personally, I like my backups done daily with a five-day retention plan. Yes it does use up a bit more space, but it’s also the safest because you’ll have backups from literally the day prior in case something happens.

The next section, Files, is where you will pick the users you want to backup along with what type of data you want to include. I prefer to just leave the defaulted settings here in this section and only choose my users that I want to backup instead. It’s your server though, so you’re free to enable/disable the various options as you see fit. I would definitely leave the options for backing up system files checked though as it is highly recommended to keep that option checked.

The next section deals with databases, and again, this one’s up to you. Per Account is your bare minimum option and is still safe regardless. Entire MySQL directory will just blanket backup the entire MySQL directory instead. The last option encompasses the two prior options, which to me is a bit overkill as the Per Account Only option works well enough on its own.

Now let’s start the actual configuration of the backup service. From here, we’ll choose the backup directory as well as a few other options regarding the retention and additional destinations. The best practice here is to have a drive specifically for backups, and not just another partition or a folder, but a completely separate drive. Wherever you want the backups to reside, type that path in the box. I usually have a secondary drive mounted as /backup to put them in so the pre-filled option works fine for me. The option for mounting the drive as needed should be enabled if you have a separate mount point that is not always mounted. As for the additional destination part, that’s up to you if you want to make backups of your backups. This will allow you to keep backups of the backups offsite somewhere else just in case your server decides to divide by zero or some other random issue that causes everything to go down without being recoverable. Clicking the “Create New Destination” option will bring up a new section to fill in all the data relevant to what you chose.

Once you’ve done all of this, simply click “Save Configuration.” Now you’re done!

But let’s say you’re ready to make a full backup right now instead of waiting for it to automatically run. For this, we’ll need to log in to the server via SSH and run a certain command instead. Using whatever SSH tool you prefer, PuTTY for me, connect to your server using the root username and password that you used to log into WHM. From there, we will run one simple command to backup everything - “/usr/local/cpanel/bin/backup --force” ← This will force a full backup of every user that you selected earlier when you configured the backup in WHM.

That’s pretty much it as far as preventative maintenance and backups go. Next time, we’ll go into how to restore all this content to a new drive in case something happens like someone accidentally deleting a database or a file that they really need back.


September 30, 2009

See You in Houston!

Next week a crowd of SoftLayer peeps are making the H-Town connection at cPanel Conference 2009. Representatives from the support, operations, sales, development, and management teams will be out in full force meeting, greeting, and learning. The conference is from Monday Oct 5 to Wednesday Oct 7 at the Hilton Americas Houston Hotel. Stop by our booth if you'd like to chat. We're throwing a reception for our awesome customers and partners at the lobby bar on Monday at 9pm. If that's not enough, yours truly will be giving a talk on Tuesday about how to extend cPanel and WHM through a 3rd party API. Y'all get three guesses as to whose API we're showing off. :) Bring your ripest fruits and vegetables and ready your air horns. It's been a while since I've had a good, old-fashioned heckling.

Come on out if you can make it. We love getting to know the folks who pay our salaries. ;) See you there!

Subscribe to whm